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Gutter overflow seaping into interior wall

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  1. #1
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    Default Gutter overflow seaping into interior wall

    Good afternoon.

    The gutter that sits over the back wall of our house appears to be overflowing and seeping into the back wall. The water then flow down the inside of the wall and leaks out of the windows and door frames. This only occurs during a very heavy rain and I assume the water is too heavy to drain away fast enough.

    I have attached a couple of pictures of the gutter for your reference.

    At this point we can't afford to pay a plumber the $1,000 they are likely to charge. So, if I can DIY a simple fix I'm all for it.

    Having conducted a bit of research online my suggested action plan is as follows:

    1. attach some flashing behind the gutter that prevents the water from seaping into the wall.
    2. putting a dab of silicone at the valley of each corrugated spot to prevent any backflow

    Can I please ask for some feedback on the above, or alternative suggestions to assist.

    Thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails picture-005.jpg   picture-003.jpg   picture-008.jpg  

  2. #2
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    the pine roof battens shouldnt be left exposed as it is...
    if you want a quick fix then i would remove the gutter and put flashing from under the corrugated roof and behind the gutter to 1. stop the pine from being exposed. and 2. any excess water goes between the flashing and gutter and runs down the polycarbonate roofing..

    if thats too much work for you, and if the polycarb roofing is fitted with a gutter system, add an extra down pipe from the metal roof which run down on to the poly roof and exists via that gutter system.. something like this (i got it off google )



    that will help with the excessive water on heavy down falls...

    but that wont fix the exposed pine....

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the response melton2

    I'll put the flashing behind the back like planned. I was intending to put straight flashing against the wall snugg up to the start of the gueer but I'm a little confused on the various types of flashing available. For example here is the profile list from the Statco website, but nothing would appear to be suitable. Any suggestions on the type I should be looking to get?

    Also is it appropriate to put polyeurathane type flashing, the ones that come in the roll? I've never seen this used before.

    Look forward to hearing from you

  4. #4
    Duck Fat - 2K club member SilentButDeadly's Avatar
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    Stratco or any other roofing supplier should be able to fold up virtually any flashing design you care to come up with. Give them the measurements of what you need...presumably to go from under the main roof to over the poly in one fell swoop.

    Main gutter many need more fall or more outlets as already suggested...
    People don't ever seem to realise that doing what's right is no guarantee against misfortune

  5. #5
    Slow but rough Uncle Bob's Avatar
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    The cheapest, easiest and roughest way to avoid this problem is to cut/holesaw overflow holes at points lower than the back of the gutter to allow the water to get away via them instead of flowing over the back. This can also be done a bit more professionaly by installing short pipes up thru the bottom of the gutter that stop lower that the back (acts like a cistern overflow).

  6. #6
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    OR...
    Search - Bunnings Warehouse

    aluminium flashing.
    easy to cut and bend, and you can buy and install it on a sunday (subject to hardwares trading hours:P)
    you will have to measure the length and width needed, but with various widths available its very forgiving.
    any joints in the flashing (if the roll isnt long enough) should be siliconed to stop water seeping through them, and any screws should be siliconed too.

    this option is cheap, effective, long term solution and hides your exposed timber which would end up rotting if kept exposed...

  7. #7
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    All good stuff, thanks forum.

    I think I'll go the aluminum flashing as this will allow flexibility where the differing lengths between roof and pergola. The price for a 20m roll appears reasonable and I should (SHOULD) be able to knock this out in half day.

    Any suggestions on fixing the aluminum flashing? liquid nails or screws. I was thinking of gluing int he first instance and then add some screws once it's in place to ensure longevity.

    Also, the flashing comes in varying thicknesses. Any suggestions on minimum thickness to use? Will the .3mm be sufficient?

  8. #8
    2K Club Member barney118's Avatar
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    I would clean out the gutter to start , then look at adding more drop points and spreader attachments to allow water to drain through multiple points.
    Installing a flashing behind personally is not worth the extra work if above doesnt work then it will still overflow behind and find its way inside, by adding a flashing increases the size of the gutter and it may not sit on its brackets or the brackets will be in the way anyhow.
    Iif you are looking at replacing the gutter then look at using slotted replacement which allows overflow through the front of the gutter rather than allowing out the back of it in heavy pours if you want to replace just this section would be more effective.
    If you take off the gutter then some weathershield paint with a couple of coats is just as good as any flashing in this instant.
    cheers Look out if I have a tape measure in my hand.....I'm upto something

  9. #9
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    A very common problem is the size of downpipes, usually 100mm x 50mm are installed, [this size should be banned in my opinion] they should be upsized to 75mm x 100mm, would solve a lot of problems.

  10. #10
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    I knew as soon as I posted that pic that someone would tell me to clean the gutter!!

    The down pipe is 100mm x 100mm, it's probably more the surface area that is being direct to the gutter.

    It seems an extra outlet is the prefered method based on feedback above, however I'm concerned this will simply transfer the problem to the pergola - although leaks would then be constrined to the exterior.

    I still thin the aluminum flashing is worth a shot. Any feedback on the adhesion of the flashing and the thickness?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ndaki View Post
    I knew as soon as I posted that pic that someone would tell me to clean the gutter!!

    The down pipe is 100mm x 100mm, it's probably more the surface area that is being direct to the gutter.

    It seems an extra outlet is the prefered method based on feedback above, however I'm concerned this will simply transfer the problem to the pergola - although leaks would then be constrined to the exterior.

    I still thin the aluminum flashing is worth a shot. Any feedback on the adhesion of the flashing and the thickness?
    actually, looking at your dirty gutter has given me reason to suggest that your gutter is not installed straight. it looks like its on an angle, and the front of the gutter sits a lot higher than the back, which will make the water escape from the lowest point (i.e the back of the gutter and into your house). or maybe this is just the angle of the photo..

    as long as the flashing underneath your roof sits higher than the front of your gutter, then water wont seep back inside, and it will escape over the front of the gutter (which is now the lowest point)

    flashing can just be screwed on
    thickness wont bear a factor onto how good it works.. installation will! i would go .3mm as it would be easier to work with than .7mm

    an extra down pipe will help expel water too. is your pergola fitted with a gutter? that will help drain away excess water too rather than dumping it all on the lawn (or where ever it goes at the moment)

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