76056
Australia's largest renovations forum

Hire the best painter and save up to 40%

Go

Repair gyprock after removing wallpaper

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Laurieton
    Posts
    22

    Default Repair gyprock after removing wallpaper

    I have just removed wallpaper from a gyprock wall using a steamer. Along the way some of the gyprock surface has torn off. Is there any particular filler that members recommend. For small jobs in the past I have used a tube of Polyfiller Skim Coat. This job has some large patches that would involve many tubes (this is a hallway). I suspect that I may not have done all the damage myself, and that it was done before this wallpaper went up. Hope someone can help.
    Bob

    "If a man is after money, he's money mad; if he keeps it, he's a capitalist; if he spends it, he's a playboy; if he doesn't get it, he's a never-do-well; if he doesn't try to get it, he lacks ambition. If he gets it without working for it; he's a parasite; and if he accumulates it after a life time of hard work, people call him a fool who never got anything out of life."
    - Vic Oliver

  2. #2
    Senior Member PlasterPro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    274

    Default

    I would invest in a bag(10kgs) of base and skim coat over any marks ect.. 2 + coats would be an absolut minimum scrap back in between coats if needed ie and dags or high spots. then use your topping compond of choice in the same manner, folllowed by a light sand. be careful not to over fill with the base/ topping, it may be tempting to put a bit more on, but you will end up with lumps n bumb. in a hallway will always be a hard one as you have long walls ans generall light at one end
    I`m sure you`ll be fine, good luck


    reagrds

  3. #3
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Laurieton
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback.
    Bob

    "If a man is after money, he's money mad; if he keeps it, he's a capitalist; if he spends it, he's a playboy; if he doesn't get it, he's a never-do-well; if he doesn't try to get it, he lacks ambition. If he gets it without working for it; he's a parasite; and if he accumulates it after a life time of hard work, people call him a fool who never got anything out of life."
    - Vic Oliver

  4. #4
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    You'll probably find that a 20kg bag of base-coat costs only pennies more than a 10kg bag (but then again, 20kg could be a lot more than you'd need), and you don't really have to worry about the top coat. Base is a little bit harder to sand, and it clogs up the paper quicker, but it still gives a good finish with two or three coats (with the final coat being scraped on, very thin and smooth). Just buy a few extra sheets of sandpaper, or sanding mesh. Or you could just use top-coat (it's all purpose) and forget about the base, but it takes much longer to dry between successive coats. Be careful when sanding top-coat though. It's very soft and you can easily sand it all off and end up with a hollow if you're too aggressive. As PlasterPro mentioned, use your broad-knife to scrape off any dags before applying successive coats.

    Use a cheap plastic broad-knife to apply, and a cheap hand sander is a good investment (or use a flat block of wood, about 100mm X 300mm, wrap the sandpaper around it and screw it down tight on top. You can screw a smaller block on top for a handle if you want). Don't just use a piece of sandpaper with your hand, or you'll dig depressions in the wall. Use a circular motion over a wide area when sanding, to get the best and flattest result. The handles of the cheap plastic broad-knives sometimes break if you apply too much pressure. They can be easily repaired by screwing two short bits of 2 x 1 together, with the blade in between. You can make a plaster hawk to carry your mortar, out of a piece of plasterboard or plywood with a timber block screwed in the middle for a handle.

    When you think you're ready to paint, run your hand back and forth, and up and down over the wall, and you'll be able to sense any bumps or irregularities that don't normally show up before you paint. Mark a circle around the low spots with a pencil so you know where to fill. Don't use a pen because ink will keep bleeding through successive paint layers.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  5. #5
    Senior Member PlasterPro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    274

    Default

    good advise,with an answer like that you could give Rod a run for his money

  6. #6
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    Thanks for that PlasterPro.

    I might just add one more tip for a perfect job if you're fussy;
    Before you even start, get a straight edge and check the wall. A 3' level will do. If the studs are bowy, then the whole wall may be wavy, and there may be depressions of 10mm or more in the length of the level. A wall light, or sunlight hitting the wall at the right angle, and you'll notice how bad the wall is when there's paint on it.

    Mix up a big batch of base-coat and slop it on the wall really thick, then scrape it off with the edge of the level. Scrape all the excess of the level and run it over the spot a few more times to get it a bit smoother. It will still be very rough, and it may have gouges in the plaster, but don't worry about it too much. The idea is to get the wall flat first, and then get it smooth with the broadknife and more plaster after it's dry.

    You could use a lot of base-coat this way, but you'll end up with a much better job.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  7. #7
    quality + reliability - 3k Club Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,729

    Default

    my advice is leave the plastic tools in the shop. get the real thing.

    i may not be around for a few days had a nasty accident with a cordless drill and a long phillips head tip. only one handed and very doped up.

    cheers rod
    CARBON TAX
    NO


    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT

  8. #8
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    I hope it's not too serious Rod.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  9. #9
    Senior Member PlasterPro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    274

    Default

    ouch, hate workplace accidents sometimes thing we do everyday are the ones we need to watch. hope you make a full recovery,

  10. #10
    quality + reliability - 3k Club Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,729

    Default

    about 2 months off. went in side ways from thumb to ring finger. everything got twisted arround the bit and contracted the hand into a tight ball. pretty nasty. but lucky damage only to one tendon sleave and one nerve.

    yep pro mrs took a pic will post in a thread later when i can get it off her phone lol nothing like the morbid details eh

    cheers guys thanks for your thoughts.
    CARBON TAX
    NO


    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT

  11. #11
    Paint Dealer Blocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Springwood NSW
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Bob,
    When you get around to painting the walls,a good quality Flat Acrylic (not low sheen)will help hide a few imperfections also.
    Regards,
    Blocker

  12. #12
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    Wow. I never realised that a cordless could do so much damage, but I suppose they are pretty powerful nowadays.
    It reminds me of the time I screwed myself to a wall with a cordless. I was fixing plasterboard sheets vertically to a wall, and I was using metal C section studs, just floating (not fixed to the plates). I was holding a stud with my fingers inside the C section, whilst positioning the vertical sheet half way across the stud so the next sheet would have something to grab onto. Anyway, I drove a screw through the plasterboard, through the metal stud, and through my finger which was inside the stud at the time. To make matters worse, I dropped the drill so I couldn't undo the screw because the drill was just out of reach. I had to call a mate to pass me the drill, but fortunatelly it was more of an embarrasment than a serious injury. Makes a good story to tell anyway.

    Look at the bright side Rod. You should have plenty of time to spend on the forums whilst your recovering. It looks like you can type OK with one hand.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  13. #13
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    Errr Rod speedy recovery, sounds horrible..... As far as fixing Gyprock If your labour cost isn't an issue - sure plaster... but its probably cheaper to re-gyprock and you're going to get a better end product if its really bad.
    WARNING
    This persons post may sometimes contain
    Course language
    Adult themes
    Drug use
    Violence
    Nudity

  14. #14
    Senior Member Jacksin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    South of Adelaide
    Posts
    311

    Default

    When you blokes knock yourselves around no-one can say you don't do a good job of it!

    But if I can get back to the initial question, I am in a similar situation to BobR where the previous owner had the same problem and simply painted over it, and I can assure you it stands out like the dogs balls.

    It didn't bother me at the time because I hated the interior colours and always intended to repaint, but its a slow process to now prep for painting.

    I hope he spot paints the patches before painting so they cant be seen through the paint
    Jack


Similar Threads

  1. Painting wallpaper
    By honey_bee in forum Painting
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 19th May 2008, 06:24 PM
  2. Water Damaged Ceiling Gyprock/ Removing Wavy Cornice/
    By quietdrinker in forum Plastering
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26th Feb 2008, 04:52 PM
  3. Wallpaper - where to get?
    By q9 in forum General Odds & Sods
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 20th Apr 2007, 11:03 PM
  4. Best way to repair crack in Gyprock
    By Hybrid in forum Painting
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 23rd Jan 2007, 03:48 PM
  5. Removing tiles from gyprock....
    By Petebass in forum Plastering
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 17th Jan 2007, 11:12 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •