88603
Australia's largest renovations forum

Hire the best fencing expert and save up to 40%

Go

Building a Merbau screening for a deck side

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    sydney east
    Posts
    28

    Default Building a Merbau screening for a deck side

    I used 90x45 treated pine for a box frame and will have to put the screws in on the front of the Merbau 90x19 (dressed side). Will it look stupid with screws in on the dressed side for the screening. The framing side is what you will see from the outside of the deck (from down the backyard. Wondering what the best way to build this merbau screening is....so that there backyard side doesn't look ugly.

  2. #2
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    Its a bit hard to picture without ...well uno pictures... but you will only see the screws when you within a couple of metres of them....unless you have shot eyesight.

    I would put them on the frame side if its really worrying you ....but beware! you may need to clamp every batten before you screw to get a good bite......


    When you screw 2 bits of timber together its sort of preferably to have the screw side timber pre-drilled so the screw doesn't bite (too much anyway) and all the pull is in the back piece of timber....NOTE this is purely from my own experience ...I have never read this or been taught this from anywhere so it could be blowies...
    WARNING
    This persons post may sometimes contain
    Course language
    Adult themes
    Drug use
    Violence
    Nudity

  3. #3
    The Master's Apprentice Bedford's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Yarra Valley Vic oz
    Posts
    7,307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bleedin Thumb View Post

    When you screw 2 bits of timber together its sort of preferably to have the screw side timber pre-drilled so the screw doesn't bite (too much anyway) and all the pull is in the back piece of timber....NOTE this is purely from my own experience ...I have never read this or been taught this from anywhere so it could be blowies...
    I'd go along with this, also sometimes you can use a screw that is not threaded all the way up the shank, this will allow it to "strip" in the first bit and grip in the second, pulling the joint together.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ScroozAdmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Redland Bay QLD
    Posts
    252

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bleedin Thumb View Post
    When you screw 2 bits of timber together its sort of preferably to have the screw side timber pre-drilled so the screw doesn't bite (too much anyway) and all the pull is in the back piece of timber....NOTE this is purely from my own experience ...I have never read this or been taught this from anywhere so it could be blowies...
    pretty accurate actually, this helps the joint to have a clamping action to really tighten down.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bedford View Post
    I'd go along with this, also sometimes you can use a screw that is not threaded all the way up the shank, this will allow it to "strip" in the first bit and grip in the second, pulling the joint together.
    the unthreaded shanks are slightly tapered also on genuine woodscrews to help grip the front timber section, hence people used to lube them to help get them in, especially with the old yankee drivers. In the fast paced world of today where everyone uses powerdrivers most screws are now 'multi purpose' with longer thread lengths and less taper for faster easier driving.

    could bore you to tears about screws all day

  5. #5
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    sydney east
    Posts
    28

    Default

    what's a good gap to set for lots of privacy?

    would it look stupid if at about half way up I increase the gap for the second half

  6. #6
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thirsty View Post
    what's a good gap to set for lots of privacy?

    would it look stupid if at about half way up I increase the gap for the second half

    I would go 20mm gap and yes it would look stupid IMO. I would keep it even spacing.
    WARNING
    This persons post may sometimes contain
    Course language
    Adult themes
    Drug use
    Violence
    Nudity

  7. #7
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    sydney east
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I was going to go with 10mm before I thought of asking people on renovate-world. IMy opinion is that alot of these types of screens - you can still see through them with their big gaps.
    I'd put a photo up but I'm not on the home computer (at mums house). Just about to start laying the first board now....hmmm what gap....

  8. #8
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    The thing with screens is that if your close to them - as you are when you are on your deck you can see through them - this is good as you have a view (hopefully)

    If you are a distance away however you cant see through it (much) so you are screening other people from seeing you, but you can see them.

    If you don't want to see "them" or you have a cwappy view just leave a 3mm gap for timber expansion.
    WARNING
    This persons post may sometimes contain
    Course language
    Adult themes
    Drug use
    Violence
    Nudity

  9. #9
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    sydney east
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bleedin Thumb View Post

    If you don't want to see "them" or you have a cwappy view just leave a 3mm gap for timber expansion.
    thanks for the tips.
    Does anyone do this or will I be the first

  10. #10
    Old Chippy - 4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canberra
    Age
    63
    Posts
    5,517

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thirsty View Post
    thanks for the tips.
    Does anyone do this or will I be the first
    As has been said gaps are largely a personal choice really although no gaps can cause problems when the timber swell with rain etc so 3mm is about as small as you'd want to go unless you use the timber saturated and butted (which I have done with some success). As others have said depends what it is your are trying to prevent - being seen or seeing out. And that depends on factors including distance, lighting, lightness or darkness of the timber and so on.

    The smaller gaps reduce visibility both ways, but often 15-20mm is a good compromise up to a gap about half the width of the timber being used (so for eg: 35mm for 70mm decking), if you want to restrict visibility a bit, but retain some breezes. But plenty around at 3-4mm.

    Best is to look around at other walls/ fences and go and have a closer look at any you see that look to be what you want.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  11. #11
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    melb
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thirsty View Post
    thanks for the tips.
    Does anyone do this or will I be the first
    my screen fwiw
    ( not completed as yet )
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dsc00065.jpg  

  12. #12
    Old Chippy - 4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canberra
    Age
    63
    Posts
    5,517

    Default

    BTW - no gaps can be a problem on any external timber work as changing moisture levels in the timber even when oiled will cause expansion and contraction. If you were lucky and the timber was at its highest moisture level when you put the timber up with no gaps then perhaps you'd be OK. If not then when the timber tries to expand and is constrained then it will move in another direction - so will lift off the framing, twist or cup - or all! So 2-3mm at a minimum on outside use.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

Similar Threads

  1. Screening a fence for a deck
    By 5teve in forum Landscaping, Gardening & Outdoors
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 4th Mar 2009, 10:14 PM
  2. Flood's Spa & Deck, Merbau on Merbau
    By Tubby2 in forum Decking
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 15th Dec 2007, 12:09 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 17th Nov 2007, 10:44 AM
  4. Spa N Deck in Merbau
    By dan76n in forum Decking
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 8th Oct 2007, 11:12 PM
  5. Brisbane Small Lot Code, deck building 1.5m side setback
    By BrissyBrew in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 19th Mar 2007, 07:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •