Full reno on Cal Bungalow in inner Melbourne

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  1. #1
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    Default Full reno on Cal Bungalow in inner Melbourne

    Hi guys,

    Thought it was about time to actually contribute something to this forum. I have been lurking around for a long time now but only registered last year.

    Anyway, I and my partner in crime are in the midst of renovating a house we bought last year. We were looking around for quite some time to find something with the following:

    * inner north (8km radius)
    * 400sqm min
    *3 bed (or 2+ study)
    * North facing
    * free standing
    * non-brick structure
    * big kitchen
    * requiring full reno
    * no recent renos (thought could be drive the price up but actually were worthless to us as we would re-do)
    * no structural changes required (i.e. no moving off walls, extensions, etc) – re-stumping ok though
    * garage or at least a big shed (I have lots of toys + tools)

    Bottom line, we wanted a place that was looking tired, needed a full reno including kitchen + bathroom, but minimising the amount that a builder would need to be involved (hence no extensions or wall removals). I’m keen and capable of doing as much as possible myself and smart enough to know to use qualified tradies when required. I’m no builder but learnt a lot (and done a fair bit) over the years from my many hours on building sites with my grandfather (who is) + uncle. I’m an engineer by background so spend my days designing and building stuff, enjoy it and I’d like to think it suits me. I’m also a big believer of doing things once and doing things properly.

    Anyway, we finally found and bought a cal bungalow. Its in the inner north of Melbourne and suffered from a lack of maintenance and ‘improvements’ made by the self-styled ‘handyman’ of the family that lived here for the last 40 years.

    The previous owners had an obvious love of concrete and filled up every spare space with it! Except for the huge vege garden which is brilliant and we’ll leave in place (probably reduce it in size somewhat). They unfortunately concreted the complete perimeter of the house up to the weather boards which allowed a direct path for moisture to get into the sub-floor. Coupled with the fact that the sub-floor already had stuff all clearance to the ground, this has ended up destroying a large portion of the sub-floor. Mainly the complete west side of the house. It was pretty obvious during the inspection as, although very little of the sub-floor could be seen (because of the concrete), what you could see was rotten bearers pretty much sitting on the dirt or concrete. It was obvious that a significant re-stumping/sub-floor rebuild would be required.

    Other than that, the place had good potential: 3m+ ceilings, 2 good size bedrooms + 1 small one/study, decent size back yard (for inner Melbourne!), north facing, open plan living (looked like walls had already been opened up) and a big kitchen. They had extended at some stage. Including a new kitchen and laundry. This had been placed on a slab at the back. A somewhat dodgy slab that looked rather un-even and would require attention – more about this later!

    Plus there were lean-to’s upon lean-tos making up a tardis like shed. I still don’t know how much shed volume there is, but once I (essentially) pull it down and rebuild it as one structure it will be plenty big enough! Oh, and they were nice enough to enclose the back of the house with 3 walls (using the original external weatherboard clad wall as the 4th) and a roof (using whatever odds and sods of materials they had horded over the years) and try to class it as a ‘sunroom’. Been handy for us to essentially live in whilst the floors have been ripped up though.

    My theory is there is no point mucking around so we moved in on the Saturday and the stumpers started on the Monday. I’ll start posting some ‘before’ photo’s, and were we are currently at if I can work it out.

  2. #2
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    Some photos from RE agent ad:


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  3. #3
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    These would be some more realistic photos!
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    Default Re-stumping

    The sub-floor was looking pretty ordinary when we had a look at the inspections so we booked in a re-stumper to start as soon as we moved in.

    As mentioned it was a big job due to poor maintenance and dodgy ‘workmanship’ of the previous owners as well as dealing with a dodgy kitchen extension.

    They had to replace about 120m’s of bearers and joists (and some wall plates) due to the rotting from concreting up to the edge of the subfloor. This was essentially the complete west side of the property.

    There’s only about 150mm clearance under our place in parts. So they needed to remove floor boards (and carpet on top) for access. No drama, I need to pull them all up anyhow. We are currently laying sub-floor insulation followed by yellow-tongue on top (for the complete house). On top of the yellow tongue we will lay carpet in the 3 bedrooms (west side of house) and then re-lay the 150x21mm Baltic pine (I think?) boards in the hallway and east side of house.

    At some stage (around 1990 we think based on a date marked on the slab) they owners extended the house for the 2nd time. But this time they did it with a good ‘ol concrete slab. Bless them. They then put a new kitchen and bathroom/laundry on this.

    Based on the step ups from the original parts of the house into the kitchen we all thought they had slabbed the whole kitchen (the 3.6x6.4m area on the plan). This was a concern cause there was a reasonably fall (and unevenness) in the (tiled) slab which I reckon was going to be greater than what self-leveler could handle. I had looked into the cost of slab jacking etc – didn’t look good!
    Anyway, long story short, we found out that when they first extended the house into the area that is now the 3.6x6.4 kitchen, they did it correctly with stumps, bearers, joists and floor at the existing floor height. This extension was probably about 3m long (of the now 6.4m total extension). What they then did was lay a very dodgy slab (2-3” thick on broken tiles, loose dirt, etc) to extend the first extension from 3m to give an overall room length of 6.4m. And at a finished height about 25-30mm higher than the existing floor height! No worries, lets just pack up the original extension to the same height as the slab with heaps of layers of masonite, tiling adhesive, and any other floor sheeting they could find… Plus when I started pulling the kitchen out there were sign of concrete cancer/flaking on the slab…

    So, we made the choice to get the guys to demo out the slab of the kitchen area (leaving the bathroom and laundry slab). They then rebuilt this correctly with stumps, bearers and joists.

    Plus they also demo’d out about a foot of the concrete paths on the west and east sides of the house. We’ll pull the rest of the concrete out from the path, back and front yards next summer. And they also demo’d the front concrete (double slab – did I mention the previous owners obvious love of concrete?!) veranda + brickwork and re-built this with bearers + joists. I just need to deck it at some stage… Oh, and they also had to remove the remnants of an old fireplace that was left in the main bedroom. This was also helping out with the rot issue in all of the wood (as some of the sub-floor came to rest on this over time).



    So it was a pretty big job in the end, but at least we now have a solid foundation to work with.


    I wont comment on cost, as ours was a little outside of the standard re-stumping job box…



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    Last edited by phild01; 16th Apr 2018 at 10:39 AM. Reason: test

  5. #5
    1K Club Member paddyjoy's Avatar
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    Looking good, keep the photos coming!

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    Wow, you guys are like the man with a wheelbarrow, you've got it all in front of you. (In other words, a big job).
    Looking forward to see the end product.

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    Thanks guys, yeah there is definitely a fair bit of work needed!

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    Default Stormwater

    So the stormwater system is not that kosher. Old school terracotta and then ‘improved’ by the previous owner. Improved as in, lets run some external pipe on top of the concrete paths, patch it into the original stormwater (somewhere – I haven’t found it yet!) and then concrete over that pipe to make it look schmicko… Oh, and at least give the water a chance to get into the stormwater pipe entry we’ll shape a spoon drain into some more concrete in the backyard. Bl$%dy concrete… Add that into the equation with multiple downpipes placed in random locations on the multiple sheds, draining onto the concrete ‘back yard’ and, well, its just cr#p. And they seem to be clogged full of stuff – I’m guessing a fair bit of dirt and debris has wandered down that open mouth over the years….

    Plus I loathe concrete everywhere or external pipework work, so its time to ditch the current system and get the stormwater slung under the house (lucky the house is now re-stumped and no longer basically sits on its guts on the dirt) and then we can rip out the rest of the concrete paths. At some stage…

    I have a mate who is a plumber so I’m doing/done the grunt work of running and hanging the pipe around the house, and he’ll finish it off tapping it back into the original stormwater at the perimeter of the house. Have run a ‘U’ setup along the W, S and E sides of the property. Done the W and S runs, but need to finish off the E run (including running around a fireplace foundation). As mentioned, there isn’t a huge amount of clearance under that house, so getting the required drop on the pipe run was only just possible.

    My mate will also re-run the gas line under the house. Its currently attached to the weatherboards with multiple runs tapped of it. It looks pretty ordinary… Same with the water pipes. That should start happening this week. Or maybe next, depends how much I get sorted this week.

    (the debris sitting in front of the added on pipe are remnant’s from the stumpers cutting up the path – its cleaned up now though).

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    Default Cut down wall plate – removal

    The photos below show the remaining part of the wall plate from when the original owners had part of the partition walls (b/w the living and dining rooms) knocked out to open up the rooms. This has occurred in a total of 3 places (b/w the original back of the house and where the kitchen was added on plus the same location as this but in the hall wall).

    Obviously the section that has been cut down (butchered?) needs to go so that I can get a continuous span of yellow tongue through the open area. I plan to cut it out.

    From a structural point of view I can’t see the cut down section doing anything useful (the wall plate that will remain is well supported). But I might ask for comment in the Structural forum to ensure I’m not missing something.


    http://www.renovateforum.com/f76/cut...emoval-109180/

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  10. #10
    JB1
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    Good work, looks like a massive reno.

    Did you buy the property knowing of the subflooring (and no doubt other) issues?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post

    Did you buy the property knowing of the subflooring (and no doubt other) issues?
    Cheers mate. I dont think its too big a reno, no walls being moved, etc. Just new kitchen + bathroom and then cosmetics. Does seem like a 'big' job while all the floors are up and we're trying to get the house structure in good order though!

    But yeah, it was pretty obvious the floor was completely rotten on one side of the house. The situation with what the story was with the kitchen 'slab' was more of a gamble, but hasn't turned out too bad. More cost than I was hoping for, but such is life. And I needed a bit of a project as I'm not playing with cars and motorbikes as much as I used too - so this is keeping me happily away from being bored and idle!

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    Default Full reno on Cal Bungalow in inner Melbourne

    That's not a reno...that's a rebuild!!

    Good luck, I'll subscribe and follow your progress.

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    Pretty sure my partner and I looked at your place before we bought our place last year. As I recall we passed on it due to the "improvements".

    We had a very similar criteria to yours as well.

    Since we have got started on our own project we have often found ourselves lamenting that the original owners hadn't spent the effort/money on maintenance instead of half arsed improvements... I think the best advice anyone could be given about buying a place to renovate is to get one thats as original as possible.

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    That cracks me up! I just looked at your thread and immediately though "whoa, looks like your place was in worse condition that ours!". You're place is starting to look great. We're a fair way of polishing floor boards and painting... Probably about time I posted an update then.

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    Default Sub-floor prep

    Have spent a fair bit of recent time getting the sub floor preped ready for yellow tongue and sub-floor insulation. Although the place has now been re-stumped, it doesnt mean the sub-floor was great. 100 odd years have meant that he hardwood joists are no longer spot on and need a bit of improvement here and there (planning/packing). 1 thing I do now know is that 100yr old hardwood is f'ing hard! Nails will often snap as opposed to coming out...


    Also needed to throw some extra joists in around the place to support some of the butt joins of the yellow tongue that wouldn't play ball and line up nicely for me.

    Plus had to also remove about 14sqm of tiles (and associated layers of underlay) before I could get the hallway boards up. Fun, not (and wearing a P2 mask on 30+ deg days makes it worse - just had it off when the missus was taking a photo). Something a little strange about using a rake in your hallway...



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    Default AV/network wiring

    Another job that needed to get done before the floor could start being laid was some wiring:
    1. Ethernet cabling (mainly used for a couple of home theatre pc's in a couple of rooms)
    2. New aerial cabling (points werent where I wanted them and it was some pretty average looking RG59)
    3. In wall speaker cabling - including a run to outside
    4. 4 core wiring to go along with the speaker cable run going to outside - to be used for a IR repeater (eventually...)

    All AV/network cabling has been done at subfloor level and all 240v is roof level - so no concerns there. All AV/ethernet wall points are separated from 240V via at least one stud (AS/ACIF S009 was followed). Obviously, due to the cabling rules of Oz, I had a sparky mate guide and supervise me rough it in and he then terminated it.

    The AV setups are for 2 rooms. The main bed room has some small Canton speakers mounted to the wall via their brackets whilst in the living room the speakers are going to sit in 4 pine wine boxes mounted to the wall. Both rooms have a 7.1 speaker wall plate to clean things up. And the speakers are hooked up to the in-wall wiring by little wall plates with 2 speaker connections on them. Just need to run banana terminated cables direct to these wall plates. I'll do this once the floors are down properly.
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    Default Under floor insulation

    Because we hate the cold and wasting energy (not to mention waiting for heaters to heat up a house etc), we will do as much as is financially viable to insulate the house as much as possible. So, although not a huge gain to be had, we have/are insulating the sub-floor while all the floor is up.

    Based on Melbourne weather conditions (dealing with radiant heat loss through the floor), and that our joists are not uniformly spaced we went with the concertina foil batts. Other options (the rigid polystyrene panels) would have been annoying to install. The Concertina batts are pretty simple to install. The first room was painful with one person trying to support the bottom of the panel whilst the other stapled them to the joist (they are pretty flexible). I eventually said “stuff that”, got some standard packing tape (used when installing normally glass/poly batts) and ran that under the joists to provide some support to them while installing. After that it was an easy 1 person job – one for the missus that is! I needed to get onto laying some Yellow Tongue down so that we had some resemblance of a floor…

    Cost us around $500-600 to do the whole house (would need to double check my receipts).

    They’re a Melbourne based company. The owner is more than happy to answer questions – just be aware it might take you about 45min to get off the phone after only wanting to ask a couple of questions! Concertina FOIL BATTS - foil insulation - main page

    They don’t seem to be hugely available. I got them from Timber & Builder Hardware Supplies in Australia – Lamcal.com.au in Heidelberg who will sell the standard (450mm) packs for $75.

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  18. #18
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    That should keep you toasty! Your wifes safety foot ware is a bit of a worry

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    Quote Originally Posted by goldie1 View Post
    That should keep you toasty! Your wifes safety foot ware is a bit of a worry
    Samoan safety shoes

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    Quote Originally Posted by goldie1 View Post
    Your wifes safety foot ware is a bit of a worry

    Umm, no comment! In her defense (and mine!) the Aussie Safety shoe is used when powertools arent running, and nothing exposed/dangerous to walk on - all exposed nails (etc) have been removed from all subfloor and the dirt has been completely cleaned of all debris (because the house had poor subfloor ventilation, I excavated a fair bit of dirt, raked it flat and removed all the crap on it). She's got some boots and I make her wear them when appropriate.

    Yep, hopefully the insulation keeps us toasty. Bit hard at the moment cause there is still a fair bit of 'natural ventilation' occurring!

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    Default Yellow tongue

    After not really having a floor down for a couple of months, it was great to finally get to put some Yellow Tongue down. Started feeling like things were moving in the right direction! All rooms have either had all the T&G floor boards pulled up, or were in the process of having them removed. We were trying to concentrate on getting 1 room sorted first so that could at least have a ‘sanctuary’ of sorts while we then did the other rooms. So the main bedroom got done a while ago and we’ve been slowly working through the other rooms. Although Yellow Tongue is not that pretty, it’s a hell of a lot better than staring at dirt floors!

    My BIL works for CHH so sorted out my YT for a pretty good price. Went the 1800mm sheets so that I could transport them home in the ute as well as manoeuvre them in the house. There were plenty of times I wish I had the 3600mm sheets because the 1800 sheets just didn’t want to play the game and easily align with my joist layouts. Originally started out by cutting the sheets to suits the joists, but got fed up with that pretty quickly so went down the path of installing additional joists/noggins to support the butt joins of the sheets. 3600 sheets would have reduced this greatly, but I definitely recommend using the 1800 sheets for cut in floor installs. I’d hate to be constantly trying to manoeuvre the 3600mm sheets around an already built house. Especially the amount I need to move them around to check levels, install insulation etc. Plus @ $6/m for F17 HW (90x45) its not a huge cost at the end of the day and its definitely not a problem having more joists than needed!

    3/4's of the house is now covered, and all the problems sorted (mainly the fact that the originally house + 2 separate extensions were not at the same level and the same story where partition walls were removed) the last part of the house should be sorted this coming weekend. Then its time to get the original 150mm Baltic pine boards back down.

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    Looks great. Keep up the good work!

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    Default Belated updated

    Hmmm, life’s been pretty frantic the last few months so I’ve been a bit slack with updates. Who would have thought that weddings, 4 week honeymoons, reno’s and a pretty hectic day job would take up so much time…

    Anyway, a fair bit has been going on since the last update. Not as much as I would have liked though! I’ll try to get up to date with some progress posts. A lot of small fiddley jobs and prep work has been happening with the aim to get to painting stage soon. Floorboards/carpets will go down after the painting. Kitchen designs still haven’t been finalised (let alone someone contracted for the job). I was hoping to get all the weatherboards replaced and all acres of concrete around the house removed before the end of summer, but we’ll see about that…

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    Default 2nd bedroom wall rebuild

    The fun of finding the surprises of dodgyness from the previous owner and his ‘improvements’ continues!

    Stripping a wall of plasterboard (too many serious cracks to bother patching) a while back I found the following bit of handiwork!


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    They’d gone and put a bigger window (1.9m) in when they reno’d about 20 years ago. Too much dodgyness to mention; missing studs, extra members added not actually doing anything, but the best is the cantilevered lintel. I’m guessing when they put in the longer window they removed the jack studs and just left the original lintel hanging by the lintel studs. Brilliant.

    So what was going to just be a re-sheeting job turned out to be a wall rebuild job. Calculated lintel size came out to 150x75 / 190x35 as suitable. Ended up using a 190x42 LVL15 as it was readily available.


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    The plasterboard is now hung and partly stopped up. I had purposely placed an additional stud around 650mm out from the left wall and then had a couple of butt joins over this as the wardrobe was going to run into the wall at this point so no stress. After the job was all done, it was ‘suggested’ that the wardrobe might be better off on a different wall. Great! Wish I’d know that earlier as I would have used 4.2m sheets (the room is 3.7m) instead (3m sheets in the ute are doable, 4.2’s are ‘interesting’! – plaster shop is only 500m away so not to bad).

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    So now that the wardrobe is going elsewhere it means the plasterboard on the wall on the left also had to come down and be replaced. It was in pretty rough condition but I had patched it up and would have been fine hidden in the wardrobe and most of it covered by wardrobe shelving. We’ll pack out that wall (nothing is straight in the place!) and re-sheet it this weekend.

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    Default Wardrobes

    Right. We need a couple of built in wardrobes built and kitted out. The plan was I’ll build them, sheet them, have our plasterer stop them up etc, get doors and internals built to our design and then either I’d install or have the suppliers do the install.

    So the one in the 2nd bedroom is progressing well. After a bit of a false start as to where the wardrobe was going to go, I framed it all up the other day. One of the walls didn’t have any noggins, so had a bit of a day while I ripped into the wall and put a couple in so the end stud of the wardrobe had something to attach to. I didn’t bother sheeting it since our plasterer is so bloody quick I just let him sheet it up as well – within the minute I had the last nail in he already had 2 sheets hanging. Money well spent he is. Dimensions are 600mm x 2400mm internal with a 2100mm(W) x 2700mm(H) opening (we have 3.3m ceilings).


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    Looking good, have been burnt before by previous owners "improvements" so I feel your pain.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by paddyjoy View Post
    Looking good, have been burnt before by previous owners "improvements" so I feel your pain.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    Cheers mate. Your project also looks pretty interesting!

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    Default Plastering and more plastering...

    A lot of time has been spent plastering and prepping walls. There were a lot of huge cracks, etc from the restumping that needed fixing (plus dents, knocks, picture hook holes, removal of picture rail damage, etc, etc) so I concentrated on that and some simple jobs and got a pro into do some of the bigger and more skilful jobs like square setting a hallway opening that wasn’t square/straight/plumb in any plane, sheeting up the fireplace (at 45 deg), external angles, etc. I reckon my plastering skills aren’t too bad now, but considering how quick this bloke is compared with me (I’ll turn my back for a couple of minutes and he’s cut, hung and screwed up a couple of sheets in that time – it would take me an hour for that!) I’m just going to get him to do all the other jobs I was going to do (the built in wardrobes and a bit more finishing work).


    BEFORE:
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    AFTER:
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    Default Fireplace

    So the fireplace started of looking like this:


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    Pretty rough. Mantel piece was ugly, the surrounding plasterboard showed signs of rising damp, etc. The hearth had to go. It was also ugly (maroon tiles to match the maroon curtains…), not level and not at the right height for the final floor height. Plus that ugly wall mounted A/C needed to go. Its going to be >30deg here the next few days so we might regret that...

    So the plaster needed to be ripped down and replaced, the rising down sorted out, a new hearth built and tiled, and a new mantel piece put in. The fireplace wont be used again - just decorative.


    Pulling down the plaster allowed the cause of the rising damp to be checked properly. Moisture readings on the fireplace and hearth support were now ok, but it was evident there was a previous issue. Water used to be able to get under the sub-floor and pool around this area previously due to a love of concrete from the previous owners and blocked up stormwater drains. A bit of effort has gone into making sure that water run off under the house wont be a problem anymore. Plus there was some remnants of 100+ yrs of mortar/brick fretting dust pooled behind the back of the affected plasterboard which wouldn’t have been helping. To be on the safe side, we cleaned everything up, replaced the plasterboard, replaced the worst of the fretted bricks and battened out the fireplace with furring channel so that there was an additional gap b/w the new plasterboard and brickwork.

    The new hearth needed to extend beyond the original brick based one and onto the yellow tongue. So I dug out the original (loose bricks, etc), and laid a new concrete slab to bring it up to the same level as the YT. I still need to put down an final substrate for the tiles to go on. Need to bring it up about 24mm so it sits a little proud of the final baltic pine floor board finished height. I didnt want the slab to extend onto the YT area for a couple of reasons - mainly that it would be traversing 2 different structures (the masonry fireplace and the wood sub-floor).


    Progress:

    img_5813.jpg

    img_5818.jpg
    img_6827.jpg
    img_6842.jpg
    img_6865.jpg
    img_6885.jpg
    img_6888.jpg

    Nearly complete. Just need to place tile substrate, lay the tiles and mount the mantel permanently.

    img_6913.jpg

  30. #30
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    Default Another well overdue update

    Ok, its been a while between updates. I should throw some photos up when I have time. So, where are we?

    Painting is pretty much complete (except trim and original hardwood doors that we have stored away). The kitchen has been re-framed (it had about a 50mm run-out from square in the corners), and completely re-plastered. Used this opportunity to throw in a cavity sliding door as well. The ceiling was laser levelled (was about 100mm out end to end due to it being an extension onto and extension). The cabinet maker has been signed up but still about 8 weeks away (he’s a pretty busy one man band). Lights have been ordered and most received (a couple are old vintage light bowls that are getting restored for us). The wardrobe internals and doors have finally been installed (and the amount of excitement we have about having a place to store stuff again is bloody embarrassing!). The long saga about what we are doing with our floors as finally been decided. I’ll give some more details once they go down and we have some pics of the finished job, but basically the original Baltic pine (150x22) is getting ditched and replaced with re-claimed tas-oak boards (133x19) that is getting new tongues and grooved remachined into them. Not a cheap solution but will give us the old, aged wood like we are after. The new Klip-lok roof went on the flat-roofed rear of the place (the rest is gable with tiles) to replace the pink painted corrugated iron that was full of holes (I’m guessing the previous owner stole it from the dump..). New insulation and sarking went in at the same time. Rinnai 26 instantaneous hot water heater has been installed and I no longer have to worry about running out of hot water!

    And most importantly, ducted gas heating gets installed next week. Brilliant! Melb is starting to get cold.

    Where to next? Choose some carpet for the other rooms. The day I no longer need to look at yellow tongue cant come soon enough! Then its time to start ripping off all the old weatherboards, insulate, and replace with new. Then paint the outside. And insulate the roof cavity properly. Then start ripping out up the beautiful concrete that has been bestowed on this place and landscape. So, should all be down in a couple of weeks. Right….

  31. #31
    Senior Member Ourbuild's Avatar
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    Default Great Job!

    Awesome work on those floors guys, very detailed! You must be proud of how the renos are coming along, great job!

    Btw - Your site looks very tidy in all your photos, i like that allot, and im sure your tradesmen do as well...

    All the best with it.

  32. #32
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    Default Yet another well overdue update

    Yet again, another belated update. A lots happened, but there is still a lot to get done. Sounds like a common story…

    Anyway, I guess the main wins have been the floors down, the painting 99% complete, ‘new’ doors + jambs hung, skirts and archs on and the kitchen in. finally! Other than that, a few other rooms pulled down, re-framed and re-plastered, plus the lights in. And another 6m2 skipped filled.

    Happy days. Went with a few(!) different tones of grey and then white skirts + arcs + ceilings.
    img_6952.jpg


    The plaster and paint (man they loved to smoke inside!) in the back part of the hallway and the smaller bedroom/study looked pretty rough, so I just ripped it all down and started again. Found the, now expected, dodgy brothers wall framing method, so ripped all that down and re-framed the partition wall to the bathroom. I reckon there was only 2 studs running uninterrupted from bottom to top plate. The rest just looked like a maze you put a guinnea pig through… All sorted now though. Ceilings insulated (in this part of the house – a lean to add on) and I also insulated the wall b/w the bathroom to, hopefully, reduce bathroom noise coming though.
    img_7046.jpgimg_7080.jpgimg_7226.jpg


    The photos of the lights don’t do them justice, after months of searching we finally found a couple of bowls that we liked (probably made in the 30s and 50s they think) at Antique Lighting Specialists Australia | Antique Light Co in Richmond. They then built them up with suitable hardware and had the hardware nickel plated. Not the cheapest but they look brilliant. I’ve also got a fetish for exposed filament Edison style globes, so we have 3 different ones of these hung naked in the dining room (Edison Light Globes - Industrial 19th Century Thomas Edison inspired globes, cable and fittings ). Again, struggled to get a good photos of these.

    img_7138.jpgimg_7206.jpgimg_7224.jpg

    We were pretty lucky with the doors. One disappointing thing when we bought the house was that all the original doors had been replaced at some stage with standard (and in very bad condition) ply doors. As the months went by we got to know our neighbour really well and he had just finished a complete renovation of their place. They were doing a more modern reno so were replacing the solid 6 panel style original doors. As luck would have it, our 2 houses were built at the same time (20s) by the same builder, so they were the perfect match for our place. Win. Needed to trim all the doors and put up new jambs to suit (no drama cause the original jambs were beaten to hell and not plumb/level so had to replace anyway) and with the new door hardware on, the place is starting to look as it should. I still need to give them some TLC and new paint, but that can wait! Havent got a photo of the doors (I’ll wait till they’re cleaned up and painted first) but heres a photo of the door handle we’re using dodgily sitting there. Looks good.
    img_7212.jpg

    We went with a stepped profile for the skirts and arcs (180 + 90mm), and am really happy with the way these have come up. Not happy with the amount of effort I needed to go through to pack out the walls to get them straight/flush so that the skirts and archs sat correctly though. The result was worth it, but bloody annoying…
    img_7209.jpg


    More rubbish - kitchen and a small bedroom. Gone now luckily...
    img_7135.jpg

  33. #33
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    Default Floors - finally!

    Finally and what a ball ac$%...

    The original plan had been to re-use the original (150x22) Baltic pine boards. So a lot of effort went into pulling them up carefully, de-nailing them and storing them for close to a year. But I’ve got to admit I really don’t like BP boards! Plus I didn’t think they’d do the place justice because they were in pretty rough shape and the face width had shrunk over nearly 100 yrs so they were anything from 150mm to 145mm.



    But I do like old boards with feature/character. So after a lot of mucking around and false starts, what we did was source some re-claimed tas-oak boards (133x19) from a demolished house, get new tongues and grooved remachined into them and the faces skimmed. Final profile was 125mmx18mm. Not the cheapest solution but the end result is the old, aged wood with nice features look we were after. And, a brilliant fit/finish that I wouldn’t otherwise get.



    The original plan was to lay the old BP boards myself and then get a pro into sand and coat. I even went and bought a shiny new Bostitch secret nailer for the job. The floors are down now, and its still sitting in its box never used. Never got to use it. Damn. After talking with a few floor guys and seeing other people’s thoughts on here, I knew I could do it myself but would get a better end result getting a pro to put them down, and more importantly, quicker! And quicker is very important at the moment – weekends just seem to vanish at the moment! The cost involved vs the time it would take me was a no-brainer. It just wasn’t worth doing it myself. I was going to use Dusty (from here) but he’s based down south of Melb, and we’re inner north, plus he was flat out with other jobs so unfortunately that wasn’t going to work. Luckily he put me onto another crew (son+father) he knew and they’ve ended up doing a great job.



    The floors have been down for a while now, but only got coated on the weekend. They’ve come up brilliantly – if you ask me! We went with Synteko Classic in matt finish. The photos still show it with a bit of a gloss sheen to it, but in the flesh it has this great flat finish to it with just a little lustre. The photos over-accentuate the warm/orange colour, in the flesh it’s a lot blonder than this. The colours/features of the timber have come up great. Happy days.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_5555.jpg   img_7045.jpg   img_7142.jpg   img_7144.jpg   img_7148.jpg  

    img_7149.jpg   img_7157.jpg  

  34. #34
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    Default Kitchen – about bl00dy time!

    And finally, the most important room in the house for us as we love to cook. We’re lucky we had a big room to play with, one of the main reasons behind buying this place. It was always planned to use as much of this room as possible for bench space, so we could both work in here.

    It’s had a bit of a journey this room, from its original start as a very tired looking 80’s kitchen:
    5.jpg


    to getting its rubbish slab ripped out of it (no reo, just a few tiles and cans) and getting rebuilt with joists/bearers:
    img_5390.jpgimg_5572.jpgimg_5887.jpg

    being used as my workshop while the rest of the place got sorted:
    img_5910.jpg

    and then getting the walls/ceiling ripped down to re-frame it (it was at least 70mm out of square…), insulated, replastered and floor laid:
    img_7012.jpgimg_7018.jpgimg_7101.jpg


    Had a couple of false starts regarding the ‘look’ we wanted, but I am really happy with the end result. We wanted to integrate a fair bit of timber into the room but without it becoming a log cabin sort of look. We were originally going to go for a timber veneer on the doors, but I also wanted some re-cycled timber in the room. But with timber floors we were concerned it was going to look like a tree house. Change in plans.

    In the end we went with a simple flat face white 2-pac door and concrete (‘oyster’) ceaserstone benchtop. I got my recycled wood fetish satisfied by sourcing some great looking re-cycled messmate (30& 40mm) from Urban Salvage Urban Salvage - Recycled / Reclaimed Timber Flooring, Floorboards, Melbourne, Building Materials, Second Hand, Wood. and getting this laminated into various panels to be used a ‘features’ around the place. Here is a couple of pics of the timber while I was cutting to length and desired layouts before delivering it to the guys that did the panel lamination.
    img_7066.jpgimg_7076.jpg


    Instead of going for the usual stone waterfall return at the end of the bench we used a panel here as the end of the bench. We did the same thing with the last panel of the cabinetry (where the fridge goes as well) and opposite this (where another pantry sits) our cabinet maker turned a few of the panels into a great looking bookshelf. I love all the exposed nail holes with the oxidisation around them. All the panels have been oiled with Danish Oil (from Organoil). Down the track 2 of my wine fridges will sit in the back corner of the kitchen and I plan to make some (simple) cabinetry for these out some of the old hardwood joists/studs removed from the house. This job is on the back burner though…

    A word about our cabinet maker. Bl00dy brilliant is all I can say! I found him by asking around a few of the re-cycled timber merchants. He is a one-man band and has an amazing attention to details and pride for producing a quality job. Wouldn’t even take a deposit for the job – that’s how confident he is about his work. He wouldn’t let me pay a cent until it was all installed. Seriously. Plus he was similar in price to the other cabinet makers we talked with (but actually cheaper because he used all top of the line Blumm hardware - full carcass draws though, no tandembox stuff). Stone guys were great as well. I’ll drop another thread into the kitchen area giving both these guys a recommendation in case anyone is looking for a quality cabinet maker and stone mason in Melbourne.

    All in all, I’m pretty impressed with the way its come together and its brilliant to have a great space to cook in once again. It took a lot longer than I hoped it would though! And there is still more stuff to be finished though before its complete: painting around the bulkheads, hang 2 pendants over the bench. mount the rangehood, install the 2nd oven, replace the windows, tiling for the splash back, some open shelves made from the same recycled messmate, etc, etc, etc…! But for now, I’m pretty content.

    img_7222.jpgimg_7154.jpgimg_7152.jpgimg_7151.jpgimg_7155.jpgimg_7161.jpgimg_7195.jpgimg_7220.jpg

  35. #35
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    Hey, where are the ducks!

  36. #36
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    Give me your postal address and i'll send them to you! Nah, sadly the previous owners took all the 'good' stuff with them!

  37. #37
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    Default Re: Full reno on Cal Bungalow in inner Melbourne

    Great job looking awesome.

    Love the lights and the fact you put back in original solid doors, we will be doing the same!

  38. #38
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    Default

    Thanks Paddy, its getting there. Not quite an adventurous a project as yours though!

  39. #39
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    Nice project ... I'm an inner-Norther too! Some of the early pictures make me shudder as I recall dealing with similar issues.

  40. #40
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OBBob View Post
    Nice project ... I'm an inner-Norther too! Some of the early pictures make me shudder as I recall dealing with similar issues.
    Yeah, definitely been more than a few hidden surprises! I definitely expected a few (it was pretty obvious from stuff that you could see, that there would be stuff you couldnt see...), but its been a real adventure 'uncovering' them. Bit like easter egg hunting as a kid. But nowhere near as enjoyable!

    Inner north? Where? We're right on the boundary of Brunswick East and Coburg (lygon st end).

  41. #41
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    We're onto our third in the area (you think we'd learn ) but this one is much less significant than the previous. We're down toward the Northcote-Fairfield border.

  42. #42
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    Default

    Looking impressive guys!! Good luck you found your kitchen joiner by the sounds of it!

  43. #43
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    Nice kitchen !! I have just finished the strip out of a similar place in the SE. Looking forward to mine looking

    as good in 12 months.

  44. #44
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    Thanks Goldie and Ourbuild. Yeah, our cabinet maker is a legend. If you ask me! Its just brilliant having a 'home' again...

  45. #45
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    Fantastic looking Kitchen!!!

  46. #46
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    Hi Choc Dog

    Back in September last year, you mentioned having tassie oak remachined with new tongue and grooves.

    I was wondering if you could share where you got this done, and what sort of cost was involved?

    Thank you

    A

  47. #47
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    Default

    Thanks MR1600, we're pretty happy with it.

    Joynz, I'll send you a PM as the I dont want to name the company publicly as they are not someone I would personally recommend. Without a few caveats....

  48. #48
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    Thanks Choc Dog.

    I have seen quite a few wide tassie oak floors in house demo sales but I actually have narrow tassie oak floors. Remachining seems like an option.

  49. #49
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    Happy days.



    Windows arrived the other day. Now just need to get them in. Pretty happy with the way they’ve turned out. There is 4 in it total. 1 triple sash bi-fold (with 300mm servery), 2 double hung and 1 casement. All double glazed and low-E glass. Vic ash (tas oak) frames and merbau sill. Good, strong well made looking units. If I’m just as impressed once they’re installed, I’ll let you know where I got them from in case other people are looking.

    Oh, and just for shauck, this should show as a nice small thumbnail so that your morse code provided internet in Daylesford is not overloaded...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_20150224_073803_105.jpg  

  50. #50
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    Nice. I was just about to ask where your windows were up to. Are you installing or do they do it?

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