WIP - Kitchen, bathroom, laundry and verandah

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  1. #51
    Resigned SilentButDeadly's Avatar
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    Default Let me tell a tale about windows....

    Here's a little saga about recycling windows.....



    Due to some much welcome genorosity, we scored a collection of double hung windows like these for not much more than effort. The vision was (and remains) that these will replace the collection of aluminium uglies that currently grace 'Fugly'.

    First job is dismantle...




    and strip...



    at this point, replace any broken glass....for which (thus far) we've typically paid $75 per frame fitted. To date....three broken panes.

    Then re-finish...




    ...and assemble. Now these are double hung windows with spiral balances - eight per window. All totally rooted after the best part of forty years use. Replacements seem to average about $20 to $25 each. Say $200 per window...

    Then add new internal latch (fitch style) and lift fittings....another $100

    Once in place with their oiled RRG trims, new hardwood screens (more $$)....



    and rather fancy (but blessedly cheap) filligree to hold the screens in...



    ...they look quite good. We are extremely happy with the outcome

    But under no circumstances think that using recycled windows is a 'budget' option.

    We were lucky in that we got this lot for not much more than love. Yet from a building recycler our house set of six windows might have set you back the best part of three grand. They were in essentially good condition yet they still needed stripping, re-beading, painting and new fittings.....anything up to $400 per window by my guess, assuming you don't have to replace glass!! And then there's the time......which'd have to be running at about 100 hours per window.

    And how much does it cost for a set of six such windows new? A 1200x800 double hung single light timber window finished in clear Sikkens from http://www.woodworkers.com.au/websit...t/1l_dh_2u.php will cost you about $930 each plus frieght.....say six grand.....if you spend two and half grand (plus many hours) doing up a set of used windows you paid three to four grand for....then you are just a bit silly.
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  2. #52
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
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    Is that Gecko real?

    BTW nice windows.
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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bleedin Thumb View Post
    Is that Gecko real?

    BTW nice windows.
    hardly!! It is a bronze casting of a gecko that is based on a Hawaiian design....same origin as the one on the door - which is (we're told) a representation of Alii, which is thought to be some sort of royal sign. http://www.alternative-hawaii.com/pr...rs/ilnicki.htm

    The windows are quite nice...
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  4. #54
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    You've done an amazing job with those windows, thanks for going to the trouble of outlining the detailed process, and explaining the costs. It's a real eye-opener.

    It was worth all the effort, every time you look at those windows you will admire them with pride

  5. #55
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    Default December 2008 to January 2009

    Summer has been pretty good to us. Fine weather.....not too hot. Until now of course.

    But most of this happened before the latest heatwave...

    Xmas was the time of the Western Wall.

    Many moons ago....it looked like this


    More recently it looked like this...it spent a long time like this!!


    Then before Xmas.....we stripped the old cladding, removes the aluminium eyesores and re-built the house frameing to accomodate the restored timber windows...


    ....and stuffed it with glass fibre batts.


    We then fitted the new windows, covered the wall in Sisalation Tuff-Wall and flashed the windows........and there it sat in its blueness for the Xmas period and a large chunk of January.

    But the Oz Day Long Weekend proved too tempting and the tin went on.

    And here's the result.




    Only job now here is to put up the external architraves and a little extra flashing (over window architraves and the sheet join near HWS).....and the fascia & soffits.
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  6. #56
    Tool Whore - 1K Club Member Vernonv's Avatar
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    Makes a huge difference to the look of the place. Great work SBD.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
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  7. #57
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
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    Beautiful job, not that it would take much to improve faux brick!. The corrugated iron with your timber windows looks great though, a bit different to the usual louver's/ aluminium windows and corro mix.

    I think the timber anchors the design down and sits really well with the external deck etc. Well done.
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  8. #58
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    I just love watching this post grow. There's something very warm about the house and the attention to detail is a joy to watch as it unfolds.

    Who da thought a "lick-n-stick-on-brick" house could be transformed like this.

    What's the plans with the garden?

    Not that I'm rushing you or anything

  9. #59
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    Why sandshoe!!

    The transformation is easy enough as long as one is paitient and can craftily minimise costs. This exercise would be soooooo easy to drop in the overcapitalisation bucket.

    The western wall windows now have their oiled red gum architraves and the fly screens are awaiting their paint jobs. We opted for smaller profile timber in the screens for these windows and I ended up recycling some of the old hardwood battens from the roof....a few passes through saw, jointer and thicknesser and they come up nice. And free.

    The western wall will also get a steel shade structure....like a colannade (?) on which we will grow grapes and espaliered fruit trees. All to provide shade from the summer sun...one day.

    Garden will probably revert somewhat to a more native arrangement due to minimal available water (both rain & irrigation).....annual rainfal is typically 260mm (but it hasn't reached this for a while) and this year we are only allowed to use 700,000 litres (or just under 2000 litres per day) of untreated river water via our water use licence to run the house and garden (excepting drinking water - but then it hasn't rained since mid December)....so we are being very very circumspect in our watering. And our planning for future plantings is made on the assumption that this arrangement will continue.
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  10. #60
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    I'm doing a bit of an over capitalisation myself. The only thing that stops me doing a bigger over capaitalisation is errrr money.

    But yeah it's amazing how far you can extend your budget by being inventive.

  11. #61
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    Default May 2009

    It's now May.......nights are getting cooler, days are getting shorter and the leaves are falling. Unlike the seasons however progress remains at one speed.....slow.



    Work on the verandah structure began in late March....



    By the end of April the basic verandah structure was in place and work began on a retaining wall.





    By last weekend (third of the way through May) the main frame of the verandah was completed by the inclusion of a massive 300x65 LVL beam which was then painted black (Weathershield charcoal) and the retaining wall had been completed....apart from the capping.

    Now to the verandah roof....
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  12. #62
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    Default ...by the end of July

    ...it was supposed to be all finished by now <sigh> but we are still having fun

    Anyway, the trusses are in!!


    Lifted in with the aid of a Franna crane, these two oregon trusses (150x50 top chord, 200x50 bottom chord) went on with minimum struggle. And the pre-painted ridge beam (300x47 Hyspan) fell in perfectly.

    The process of adding rafters began shortly after. They are 200x50 F7 oregon


    We've since finished filling the main pitch with rafters and cross bracing it all back into the original roof. Now to do the rear section and add the battens etc. before covering it all in tin.

    In other news, we've another new toy......a Biolytix septic filter


    The tile drain on our old septic failed and this thing seemed the best option for us. Not cheap by any means and certainly not complicated despite the makers desire for it to seem so (my background is in sewage treatment so I am familiar with these things). It would actually be possible to assemble one of these from off the shelf parts (Biolytix do) but then that wouldn't be legal now would it. Oh well. But we can't complain as it will reduce our garden watering needs rather substantially which is good considering our very restricted water supply.
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  13. #63
    Tool Whore - 1K Club Member Vernonv's Avatar
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    Looking good SBD.

    These things always take longer than you expect. I've given up being surprised when our renovation schedules blow out ... just need to condition the wife to accept them as easily as I do.
    Cheers.

    Vernon.
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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilentButDeadly View Post
    Well spotted!! It wasn't till after the photos were taken that I stood back, looked and swore . I'd housed the lintel but forgotten the continuous stud. So now there is a continuous stud in there as well...

    The red gum deck is 200x50x2700 landscape sleepers that have been dressed in the thicknesser. They've been slotted between the 100x50 red gum joists. The sleepers have been spaced up level using red gum as well. Finish is Intergrain Natural Decking Oil. The sleepers were about $11 each and there are 30 of them....from a materials perspective the cost per sq metre worked out at roughly $20. Cheap yes but she took a bit of time to finish and fit.....

    Last two walls this weekend and the roof frame next weekend....
    I'm just wondering how your redgum sleeper deck is holding up - as far as cracking and moving goes. i think its been a couple of years since you built the deck (based on the posting date). I was thinking of doing the same, but the sleepers are 'wet' (straight out of a plastic sealed pack, and seem to be holding a fair bit of moisture, but very straight). great post -

  15. #65
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    Ashley.....the deck is holding up just fine. It now just needs a good clean and an oil. Yes there has been some movement but nothing drastic or unsafe. As long as you can cope with some wobbly lines in your deck then I reckon that the sleeper option is a ripper.

    There has been some substantial progress since I last posted but that is another tale.
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  16. #66
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    Default The Battle of the New Kitchen

    The last little while has been taken up with preparing to replace the kitchen. This has involved fitting a tad more of our recycled floorboards to give us the final (ish) floor area for the kitchen then sanding and oiling them. Also a bit of gyprocking, painting and whathaveyou.

    That part of the fun done and we move on to the kitchen itself.

    Like many these days we chose to purchase an IKEA kitchen. They are cheap (especially when you elect to have a drawer dominated kitchen like us) and it would fit easily into the space.

    Unlike many these days we chose to purchase only the cabinet frames and drawers (no fronts and no worktop) so we could make our own bespoke kitchen.

    Thus far this has gone smoothly......except for IKEA not holding any 800mm wide base cabinets in stock - they have to be ordered (or reserved in IKEA speak).

    Interestingly...the cabinets are not special. Far from it. Made in Slovakia from compressed recycled matchboxes and two hopeful layers of melamine they are not brilliant. But they do work and appear quite strong.

    The drawers are special. I thought they'd be made in China el cheapo double walled Blum knock offs. They are actually Blum TandemBox drawers!! If I'd known this I'd have bought only the drawers and got a Lamikit flat pack for the frames instead. These drawers are much cheaper at IKEA than anywhere else to my knowledge - 60cm wide drawers for a 70cm deep cabinet were just $45 each. Every other price I saw for these drawers had them at a cost of anywhere between 300 to 500 extra over the basic five drawer cabinet - wheras at IKEA we paid $310 all up per 60cm five drawer.

    So there you go....more soon!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails floor-butcher.jpg   first-sand.jpg   coarse-sanding-result.jpg   half-kitchen.jpg   yanda-verandah.jpg  

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  17. #67
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
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    The sleeper deck looks great SBD!

    I used crapiarta TP sleepers on a small deck here. It's cheaper than decking, and I like the chunky look.
    Cheers, John

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    thanks for the update - well that settles it for me. i'll be going with the 200 x 50 redgum.

  19. #69
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    Default November 2009

    Works continue........as does the amusement.

    We have focused recent attention on the wall that separates the house from the new verandah room. We knew that it was going to be replaced because it was likely to be complete crap in a structural sense and extremely difficult to repair and/or retrofit.

    With the installation of the new roof trusses in the verandah (which were designed to support the full span of the wall) the original wall was no longer a significant structural component of the house....fortunately.

    Stripping off the two layers of original cladding exposed the old frame....and it was just so special that I had to take a few photos and share the beauty...

    We had studs that don't span the full height of the wall, unsupported lintels, not bracing bracing, a random approach to noggins and a number of other entertaining little mishaps.

    The cream and cherry of the wall was the almost total absence of gyprock adhesive and fasteners so we were able to dismantle the entire wall without removing the internal lining.

    The icing sugar is the power point under the old mini window that is wired up around the outside of the studs.....our electrician loves our place.

    All the visible framing has now been replaced with new studwork with openings for two new windows and all is to Code (so much more timber!). The centre of the wall is still in place until I can put a beam across the internal wall perpendicular to this wall and then it'll be removed to make way for a set of double doors.....this weekend I hope.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails old-kitchen-window-wall-framing.jpg   kitchen-window-old-framing-detail.jpg   kitchen-window-old-framing-detail2.jpg   old-kitchen-window-frame-south-end-detail.jpg   eastern-wall-old-framing.jpg  

    eastern-wall-old-heater-framing.jpg   eastern-mini-window-old-framing.jpg  
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  20. #70
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    Well.......the beams went in. The beam over the new double doorway is a 2.2 m length of 300x63 LVL and that is supporting a 4.9m length of the same across the house. The remaining 400mm wall frame above the long beam is also cross braced with bracing angle.

    If you compare the first photo with the first photo a couple of posts back (the one with the oven in it)....they are much the same view.

    All installed by yours on the lonesome with some rope and rachets. Not entirely recommended because that LVL is on the stupid side of heavy but it worked none the less.

    Just two windows and a set of double doors to go in.....perhaps this weekend?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails looking-north.jpg   looking-south.jpg   looking-east.jpg  
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  21. #71
    Lumberlubber Bleedin Thumb's Avatar
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    Good stuff SBD. All I can say is that your missus is more tolerant than mine. It will be a real transformation when its finished.
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  22. #72
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    Tolerant? Tolerance is not required. Just Realism. And we have plenty of that.
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  23. #73
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    Default This is the New Year.....same as the last year

    This year represents the third calender year of the renovation....which has of course really ended up being a rebuild.

    To close off 2009.....we opened up the house...which you saw earlier. But now we've got windows, doors and new gyprock. And it is so much nicer.

    We also have new tin on the outside but we can't seem to find the photos....

    This year....we'll finish it. For sure. Mostly.

    We still have the front to do outside plus the rest of the verandah structure and quite a bit of flooring....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p1010797-2.jpg   p1010799-2.jpg   p1010802-2.jpg  
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  24. #74
    tcf
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    Looking good SBD....but what does finish it. for sure. mostly mean? haha this stuff never ends does it?

  25. #75
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    Three months later......time for an update.

    Things have taken a turn for the slow due to 'other commitments' (there's a clue in one image) but there is still progress.

    The first image goes back a few months just to get a picture of how far things have come. Everything is based on a frame. And this is our to be enclosed verandah...

    The new old windows and doors went in on the inner wall then the wall itself was clad. Sparky has also been in - fitting lights, power points and fans in the verandah space. Then we moved to the outside walls of the verandah itself - more tin, topped with 200x50 river red gum landscape grade 'sleepers' (planed and oiled). Just finished the tin on the outside of the low walls.

    Still to do here....hardwood verticals between the RRG posts to carry the (probably) galvanised steel woven insect mesh, painted timber mouldings or steel or both to hold insect mesh to the timber, four screen doors and the small matter of 50sqm of reclaimed Tasmanian Oak floorboards.

    And then there's only the front to go!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p1010680.jpg   p1010796.jpg   p1020052.jpg   p1020056.jpg   p1020058.jpg  

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  26. #76
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    WOW SBD what an amazing transformation!!!

    Your renovation looks fantastic, and the (almost) end result seems well worth the time and effort.

    Thanks for sharing pics and details

  27. #77
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    Why sandshoe!

    Been working on the verandah a bit further.....another dozen 120x45 KD verticals are on their way into the structure to carry the insect mesh.

    This mesh comes in 1220mm roll widths. We've selected 16 mesh x 28 SWG woven galvanised steel wire as our mesh - it looks like typical insect mest on steroids. Cost is a smidge under $30 per lineal metre from Locker Locker Group - Expanded, Perforated & Wire Products We could've gone with mesh from 304 stainless but felt that the additional 50% in cost would not get us a 50% improvement in durability or practicality.

    Soon....the front of house beckons.
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  28. #78
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    Default New addition....

    Just found this thread .....Amazing transformation, I love the verandah, is that nice wide board on the edge for seating?
    Also congratulations on the arrival of your pram, I mean baby.....that sure will slow you down or maybe motivate you especially once they start crawling .

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    That was a great mornings read. Would never have seen it if not for recent post. Awesome. Any more to come??

  30. #80
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    Ah...yes. Much has changed since I updated this.

    Verandah has been floored (November 2010), screened (January 2011) & lined (Feb 2011 - lower section only).

    50sqm of damaged internal T&G floor has been removed and replaced (March 2011)

    Front deck has been fitted (March 2011 - more RRG sleepers).....

    Still to go.....internal floor sand & oil, pergola on nothern and western sides, northern external architraves, much internal architraves and significant internal joinery

    Having been saying to myself that I must update this thread for ages!! So will try and manage photos to match shortly...
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    Default ...to April 2011

    One year of work since our last public demonstration of progress. We have many excuses....most are related to not feeling the need to make sufficient effort to keep our Unknown Audience (that's you, Dear Reader) informed.

    That shall be rectified in the next couple of posts....

    In August 2010.....we got ourselves organised for another push. And we did some verandah flooring....almost 50sqm of it. A tag team of three worked over a seven day period to measure, cut, fit, cramp, drill and nail a small mountain of recycled Tasmanian Oak floorboards to our now very well seasoned hardwood bearers. Best we managed in any one day was 12 rows of floorboards....or 60 lineal metres. Recycled is ethical, good for the soul....even affordable.....but it is a slow bastard of a job!
    p1020133.jpgp1020137.jpgp1020140.jpg
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    Once the verandah floor was in place we then turned to the front of Fugly....time for its new face.

    Removed the last of the fake brick to find two walls that were actually made 'properly'!

    So of course we modified them to include yet another recycled & renovated double hung window (provided by a colleague for a good bottle of wine) which replaced the bloody awful aluminium window that was in there plus a set of double doors (new - from Entry doors, Pivot doors, Windows, Handles & hardware, Gates and many more at Woodworkers).

    Then a fresh coat of wall wrap and corrugated iron......and that was August 2010.

    p1020144.jpgp1000009.jpgp1000013.jpg
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    Nothing much happened until.....well.....January 2011.

    Except a tonne of rain....between October 2010 and March 2011 our region received three times its average annual rainfall.....so it got a little soggy around here.
    p1000047.jpg
    This type of flooding was repeated four times....but the house was never touched.

    No matter. The other delay was sourcing a floor sander person. We'd already had a go at floor sanding inside ourselves and quickly realised....never again. Our first booking failed after the bloke ended up in hospital and then it took until the end of the year to line another mob up - and he turned up between Xmas and New Year! Still only charged $600...

    Then all we had to do was tidy up and give it a couple of coats of oil

    p1000102.jpgp1000106.jpgp1000107.jpg
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    So the floor was in, oiled and useable.....but the rain meant the mozzies were ferocious. So we had to get on to the installation of the mesh.

    This is beautifully woven 14ga galvanised steel wire that we purchased from the Locker Group. It is way more expensive than fibreglass or aluminium but stronger, tougher and far better quality....should last 50 years.

    It is just stapled on.....broke my old hand stapler on the way around so a new one was required part way through.

    p1000113.jpgp1000110.jpg

    Suddenly, we could eat outside....but indoors
    p1000114.jpg

    Staples however are not enough. Cue the battens. Our battens are made from hot dip galvanised 40x5 steel....so we don't expect them to rot anytime soon.
    dsc00301.jpg

    The bottom wall has been lined internally too. With JH Exotec 9mm external cladding. Which is simply heavy duty cement sheeting.
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    And we've done the front verandah too! The sleepers are screwed into recycled plastic lumber bolted alongside the steel bearers....

    dsc00305.jpgdsc00306.jpg

    There's still the small matter of the pergola out here...
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  36. #86
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    And just to recap...

    Here's where we were back in 2007
    p1000509.jpg

    And where we are four years later
    dsc00308.jpg

    Not a bad show, eh?

    But that's only the outside....still a WiP on the inside!
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  37. #87
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    Simply awesome. You guys have really gone the extra mile. Keep posting. I'm hooked.

  38. #88
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    Holy moly... What a transition! You are true visionaries.... Amazing work. Keep posting, I'm hooked too.

  39. #89
    Resigned SilentButDeadly's Avatar
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    Default .....to May 2011

    The Easter period was productive......some time off and an invasion of in-laws and various outlaws (bloody mice) promoted yet another fertile period of building.

    The aim of the game was 'to finish the front of the house'. So easy to say. And why not...it was nearly there anyway.

    Just a small matter of dressing & oiling two dozen lengths of rough sawn River Red Gum and then shaping them to fit. And making sure all the measurements are done perfectly because its all the timber we have and the mill shut early this year.....so no more RRG.

    Much checking, rechecking, angst.....and general dicking about. Took a few days in all. Despite this I still made an elementary wood fashioning mistake....but you'll never know to look at it.

    What we did was:
    Line all the eaves;
    Alter the downpipe plumbing;
    Install a pergola; and
    fit external architraves.

    Has come up rather fine....
    p1000336.jpgdsc00304.jpgp1000237.jpg

    The first photo comes from late 2006, the middle shows how we stood in early April and the last......how it appears now....
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  40. #90
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    You'd have to point out the mistake because all I see is great work.

  41. #91
    HOW MUCH??? mcsmart's Avatar
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    Fantastic. I see where you are coming from with some of your posts in other threads. Great job.

  42. #92
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    Never let endless renovation get you down....it is now a full year since I last updated this thread. And what the stuffing mushrooms have we done to show for it? Nothing but smug satisfaction

    Improvements in that last twelve months have included:
    - a completely repaired kitchen floor which involved total removal & replacement of the remaining 20 square metres of smashed up & shrunken floorboards then a full sand to strip the estapol off the old boards and re-finish the new boards followed by a complete oiling. So now the floor looks like it belongs there...but holy moly what a mess;
    - all the internal architraves are in! 90mm Merbau decking for skirts, windows and doors with 80x20 River Red Gum machined from rough sawn air dried 90x45;
    - the Library area at the front of the house has been established with a home made floor to ceiling bookcase made from recycled hardwood beams (laminated into five 300x50 uprights), left over bits of house frame and the last of our floorboards for shelves - I had to make it in the shed as a knockdown frame, disassemble it for finishing and then carry it into the house for final frame assembly. Twenty two shelves were then made up from the floorboards, finished and installed. Voila! 20 odd metres of new storage....that is stronger than the wall it is attached to.
    - Outside we managed to finally chew through the many cubic metres of 50x20 pine batten that was once used to attach the accursed fake brick cladding to the house frame and it is know all roughly piled in the woodshed for future incineration...
    - and the house now wears a 2.2 kW grid connect solar system that (based on the last quarter results) looks like easily ensuring we don't pay another power bill...provided I can keep the damn things clean in the face of many a dust storm!

    Photos, eh?
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  43. #93
    Old Apprentice The Bleeder's Avatar
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    Don't tell me....massive dust storm covered the solar panels so no lecky to charge the camera battery.....
    Steve

    Live while you're alive and sleep when you're dead

  44. #94
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    p1000726.jpgp1000729.jpgp1000566.jpg

    In case of dust storm...use the bicycle charger instead.

    And yes...we painted the low wall around the outside verandah in Porter's chalkboard paint - four different colours. It's a fabulous quality product, excellent price and great service and (naturally) a really fun result.
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  45. #95
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    p1000771.jpgp1000766.jpgp1000767.jpgovendrawers.jpg

    Kitchen drawer fronts. Such simple things. So why do they take three years to do? Probably because they are simple.

    Our kitchen is an IKEA. It uses 'Made for IKEA' Blum Tandembox drawer system...which is why we bought it. We decided way back to make our own fronts and benchtops since the IKEA stuff didn't suit us. As a temporary measure, we used old floorboards as drawer fronts, chipboard sheets overlaid either with melamine finished chip from some old cupbards or oiled construction ply as benchtops and ceramic knobs that we found on closeout at a local furniture store.

    Original plan involved River Red Gum and Hoop Pine plywood fronts but a combination of budget, time, ability, care factor, time, time and time bought us back to a modicum of reality. Original plan for tops (laminated RRG) remains on station.

    So we just went for plywood. Plain old (or new in this case) CD grade construction ply. 18mm Carter Holt Harvey Ecoply. $240 for four sheets.

    Two hours one Friday morning in the local woodworking machinery supply shop with their panel saw had my four sheets chewed into small sections....$140. I spent another $90 on a smashing little Festool Euroscrew drill bit which was a lot for a little but well worth the spend.

    Cupboardware in QLD had a nice little Blum jig for marking up the drawer fronts for drilling...$70.

    The cut up fronts then spent a few weeks chilling out because they were still a bit juicy from when they were trees. They needed to dry out a bit before they could be easily sanded.

    Sanding was an allround blast of 120 grit on the belt sander followed by a 240 grit on the front face with the orbital. Edges got the 240 as well.

    Than all the fronts got drilled & fitted - painstaking and slow but less fraught than finishing then fitting. Took a few weekends and just a little swearing.

    Now they were ready for finishing. A quick wipe over with 400 grit on the face and then they were coloured all round with food dye. $10 for four bottles.

    We mixed three colours - variants of blue, red and green from the full color range available at your nearest supermarket. We were looking for a slightly dirty lime washed version of each colour. The first image is one of our test sheets. Patience is the key to using these dyes as they change as they dry especially the reds.

    In the end, about a half litre of each colour was sufficient to colour the panels all around.

    Once the colour had dried then the panels were lighlty sanded again to flatten any raised grain and the sealer applied. We chose Intergrain UltraClear Interior water based in matt ($125 for four litres). Proved to be a good choice. The finish is totally clear and slightly enriches the colour. The product dries fast even with the cool and damp weather and is a joy to use. Seems to be a PVA based product because it looks and feels like dilute Aquadhere in the tin!!

    So far the blue sections and red sections are now fitted. Only the green bits to go. In the meantime...some taster photos. I'll whack up something more definitive in a later post

    There's no doubt that our result is not everyones cup of tea but it works for our house. Certainly didn't cost much. Took a bit of time but not as much as I make out since the time taken reflects our time management rather than actual time spent on the job.

    Sadly, it does bring into stark reality the fact that the benchtops are really really not very nice....
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  46. #96
    Slow but rough Uncle Bob's Avatar
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    love ya work SBD!

  47. #97
    House Husband - 1K Club Member
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    Looking good SBD, obviously there was nothing good on tele after all.
    Using food dye for timber is something i would never have thought of..... but timber being cellulose based and a food (if your a termite) is the perfect surface for it. Very subtle hues too, with the grain showing though.
    The first image is one of our test sheets
    They look like they could do with a frame around them and be hung on the wall somewhere...

  48. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundancewfs View Post
    They look like they could do with a frame around them and be hung on the wall somewhere...
    There's a thought...

    TdF is on the tele....that'll sort me for the next three weeks.
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  49. #99
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    p1000801.jpgp1000802.jpgp1000804.jpgp1000805.jpgp1000808.jpgp1000811.jpgp1000798.jpgp1000796.jpgp1000774.jpg

    Had a bit of time and some decent light and taken some images that avoid as much as possible the rather average benchtops and their typical untidiness. Fair to say though...food dye, construction plywood and a bit of effort make a decent looking kitchen. Hopefully we'll finish it before another three years pass!!
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  50. #100
    Resigned SilentButDeadly's Avatar
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    Default It's now the end of 2012 and...

    ...ta daaah. Or thereabouts.

    p1010128.jpgp1010131.jpgp1010132.jpgp1010135.jpgp1010137.jpgp1010157.jpgp1010159.jpg

    The last six months or so have been an exercise in quiet progress. Winter and spring are a time for preparing for summer in these parts and the garden got an extra dose of TLC to cover for the lack of time spent on it over the last couple of years. Also had to fit two new tank straps to the house water tank (an old concrete thing) that proved to be an elemental battle between Yours Truly and seemingly never ending lengths of metal strip over how keen we were about getting two coats of Cold Gal...which wasn't a renovation for a family audience. But it was also a time of preparing a few other more enjoyable jobs.

    The main effort has focused on what we thought might be the last major construction effort that is to be attached to the house. The western side of our place cops the worst that our hot dry climate can chuck down at us over a summer and we thought shading the western wall and windows would help the house perform better on the hotter days and reduce the need for using the swampy to keep the place cool. So the idea of a pergola like structure was hatched. A check of our remaining stocks of structural RRG showed that with a clever use of recycled lengths and some minor adjustment of 'Staines Law' we could build the main component from RRG to match the other major features of the house - nominally 100mm square posts (seven @ 2000 centres) & 150x50mm beams (enough to do about 14 metres). However, there was a complete lack of 'rafters'. A visit to the metal shop turned up seven lengths of downgrade 30x30x1.4 square gal which neatly knocked down into 2400mm lengths, a couple of lengths of 50x50x2.5 black angle (more sodding ColdGal) to act as a ledger on the house and two sheets of reinforcing mesh, each cut in half. Application of welder, drills, paintbrush, many bolts and an abundance of screws and quite a lot of recycled wire...coupled with some unfortunate use of the English language...we had a pergola. Shade cloth tops it out until the deciduous vines grow...

    Suffice to say that the addition actually works. Heat soak is substantially reduced and the house can now withstand a high 30's/low 40s day until very late afternoon (if it was down in the teens the night before) without kicking the air con in the guts (and upsetting the resident frogs).

    Another job was the last pair of doors. Screen doors to be precise. Recycled jarrah from the 2nd hand shop and some left over metal gauze from the verandah and that job was mostly done - still needs handles and a closer...maybe next year.

    The other major work in progress is the kitchen benchtops. I may have mentioned way back what the plan was but as a reminder - River Red Gum. Surprise. Surprise. We invested a small sum of money when we bought the place on two stacks of air seasoned rough sawn 100x50 (nominal!) from the local mill. No-one needed it, it was going cheap and we were cheap. Fast forward seven years and we are now ready to treat it as it deserved. The Boss and I spent a day at the saw bench getting filthy whilst milling a small selection of the timber into something flattish and squarish. Another day on the thicknesser and, to a lesser extent, the jointer (I have a fractious relationship with this one - it may lose out in the end to a new table saw) and we ended up with a smaller pile of neatly aligned sticks, a small mountain of sawdust and some great smelling chooks. Further banging away, swearing, sawing, more swearing (measure thrice, cut once - not the other way around) and the judicious application of glue and clamps got us the rough outline of one kitchen bench top. Mostly flat, mostly square and only slightly shorter than originally intended [first bench image]. Devout application of planes, belt sander, melting candles, wax sticks, filler, orbital sander and enough sandpaper to make a sail produced something worth putting a finish on. In this case, the finish is Organoil's Hard Burnishing Oil and it is applied straight onto timber that has been sanded down to 1200 grit wet & dry [second bench top image]. The final image is a close up of the finish post oiling but without further work. Still to come is a rub with a fast moving piece of sheep and a final application of polish - still tossing up between Ubeaut's Traditional Wax or some plain old beeswax polish (though since the boss doesn't like the smell of the Ubeaut then we might already have a decision).

    Then I have to chop a bigger hole in it for a sink...

    [To be continued...next year]
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

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