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Plans call for agi drain to be connected to stormy, but we donít have stormy

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  1. #1
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    Default Plans call for agi drain to be connected to stormy, but we donít have stormy

    Heh all!

    Doing a kitchen and bathroom renno, and the plans call for an agi drain to be installed and connected to stormwater outside the bathroom extension on the boundary line, but itís an old double brick house built in the 1940s and doesnít have stormwater on the property at all.

    Any suggestions as to a solution or an alternative, without getting stormwater installed to the property?

    Cheers in advance!

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    Where does the stormwater go currently?

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    Hi Uncle Bob. The house allegedly doesnít actually have any stormwater at all - itís all just run-off via down pipes from the gutters onto the concrete footpaths. I found it hard to believe it doesnít have any stormy, but there are indeed down pipes onto the concrete all around the house from every gutter, the only exception being a box gutter that runs along the roof on the boundary wall side near the neighbour.

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    Quote Originally Posted by livo View Post
    old double brick house built in the 1940s and doesnít have stormwater on the property at all.
    So you dont have gutters on the house draining the storm water away? Is there a downpipe coming down the wall near the bathroom?

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    Quote Originally Posted by livo View Post
    Hi Uncle Bob. The house allegedly doesn’t actually have any stormwater at all - it’s all just run-off via down pipes from the gutters onto the concrete footpaths. I found it hard to believe it doesn’t have any stormy, but there are indeed down pipes onto the concrete all around the house from every gutter, the only exception being a box gutter that runs along the roof on the boundary wall side near the neighbour.
    That's quite common in older houses, you have two choices.

    Have the house connected to the stormwater which in some cases is not possible due to insufficient falls, or install a soak pit somewhere in the backyard.

    The last one we did had to have a soak pit in the backyard, it was about 3m wide, 2.5m deep and 8m long.

    I don't know who determines the size of the pit, I'm sure there is some formula for roof area / rainwater capture / soil type etc to determine how big the pit has to be.
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    There is a box gutter on the roof along the boundary side near the neighbouring property, and then just down pipes around every other perimeter of the house running onto the concrete footpath

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    @Uncle Bob yes ideally we would get a stormwater connected to the council mains, but trying to avoid that as it would cost about 35 grand apparently, possibly more.

    I like the idea of a soak pit but not sure how we would run it to the back of the property (or anywhere else for that matter) - the extension is going almost right to the boundary and there are double brick footings on every wall. I dabbled with the idea of having an intense box gutter somewhere on the wall cavity and feeding under the house to the back yard, but we donít have the space for that it seems.

    Maybe a solution is to concrete the ground up to the new rendered wall to stop moisture in the soil

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    Your local council should have information regarding the requirements for stormwater.
    While it may not have been a requirement in the past any renovations may need to meet current standards, which may require you to connect to your legal point of discharge (LPOD), or may just need to be directed to the gutter on the street.

    In some cases councils have requirements for stormwater to be connected to the LPOD but due to the age of the property that may not exists, While it is a requirement that council provide a LPOD sometimes they may attempt to make you assume responsibility of the connection outside your property such as the case of our property. What is the case for stormwater for all the surrounding properties ?

    Where does runoff from the concrete path go ? and can an agi drain be directed to the same place, ie is there fall on the property.

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    Yes there is definitely fall on the elevation of the land to the back of the property from the location of the new extension.

    All of the current down pipes just run onto the concrete paths on our property, and runs down the path toward the back of the property - they donít actually technically discharge anywhere - just straight onto concrete.

    However, said down pipes are on the opposite side of the property to the extensions (down pipes on the west side, extension on the east side). I imagine the only way to get the extension to discharge to the other side would be under the house, passing through the brick footings

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    i had similar issues in my 1950s house. no storm water pipes on the council plans. the down pipes went somewhere, but was obvious the gauge might have trouble with more water.

    For me it was a granny flat build, and the option was to either pump storm water to the street, or an absorption pit. i opted for water tanks and the overflow into a pit. gives a bit of a buffer was my thought.
    The trench that was dug was like something from the somme, we had rain too and was an absolute mess. i had just taken down an old fence and so the palings formed walkways around the site. the plumber put down some sort of dual shell/tunnel to keep the void in place and covered with geo fab. seemed a neat solution. as mentioned above, there is a formula for the size based on roof area and it has to be a certain distance from any existing dwellings. also, council inspector had to come look before it was buried. to give a rough idea, the grannyflat roof is probably around 70sqm and the trench was about 8m long.

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    Not required to go under.
    You can go around fairly easily. Just may need to run in 100mm pipe, or do multiple runs in the same trench.
    My front has 2, and gains a 3rd run from the side with the soak wells at the back. Pipe is pretty cheap, it's just the labor of digging the trench.

    Shire requirements may be different depending on soil type but as an indication I was required 1m3 per 65m2 of roof. Which added up to 6000L worth of storage for the house.

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    Thanks Doovalacky, thatís good to know! Iíll look into that

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    Default Plans call for agi drain to be connected to stormy, but we donít have stormy

    In older suburbs in Brisbane they had what I was told was foul water pipes. These are not council owned so they accept no responsibility for maintenance In the properties we have with these foul water lines the pipe tends to run in the backyard downhill towards the next cross road.
    These pipes connect to stormwater but we had a house from 1890 that the bathroom and kitchen also drained into a pit connected to this line. I have no idea if the bathroom/kitchen should be connected just stating how it was. Not much on that house was legal when we bought it.
    The pipe running in the backyard our current occupied house house the same system and it carries a lot of water.
    Our neighbourís had no stormwater connection and their backyard was a bit of a swamp, one pipe went into a pit. Once they connected to this line they have a backyard the kids are proud of.


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    Wow, what an eye opener. Until now took it for granted everyone in the suburbs was connected to stormwater!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart1080 View Post
    Wow, what an eye opener. Until now took it for granted everyone in the suburbs was connected to stormwater!
    Nope, I had a house in a well established suburb, it was no more than 5 minutes to a major city hub and it was not connected to storm water,
    Water just went into a pit in the backyard hidden just under the lawn, in heavy rains the pit would eventually overflow and start to flood the backyard.

    The only way I found it was one part of the grass used to die off in summer, it was because the pit was too close to the grass and not enough soil coverage.

    One day I saw a concrete structure under the dead grass, and though it was left over construction rubbish, I lifted the slab up and found a pit about 10m long about 700 deep and 700 wide.
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    just in case it hasnt been thought of - what about charged pipes?

    As long as the gutter is higher than the street gutter, you just use charged 100mm piping to run it up the hill and into the gutter.

    we ran our pipes through a new outlet just to the property boundary at the street and that was approved without problem (access type road). the main thing councils seem to be concerned about is draining onto neighbour properties and people putting it into the sewer - just my impression

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    Quote Originally Posted by pharmaboy2 View Post
    just in case it hasnt been thought of - what about charged pipes?

    As long as the gutter is higher than the street gutter, you just use charged 100mm piping to run it up the hill and into the gutter.

    we ran our pipes through a new outlet just to the property boundary at the street and that was approved without problem (access type road). the main thing councils seem to be concerned about is draining onto neighbour properties and people putting it into the sewer - just my impression

    A charged system will work as long as the inlet is higher than the outlet. As the OP is looking to connect an agi drain it would need the bottom of the trench to be higher than the street gutter.

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    Yeah the elevation of the street definitely falls toward the back of the house, with the extension almost bang on the middle, so a charged pipe to the street is prob out of the questing Iíd say. Thanks anyway though!

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    .....might sound like a silly suggestion but just thinking through some of the other suggestions that require a pit to be constructed.
    Appears no matter what solution in this instance is applied, its potentially always going to be problematic particularly given the aggi is lower than the street gutter therefor leaving few options...so I'II throw in another.

    I know the primary question is for the aggi however here goes.....

    Do you have any idea of likely water volumes? If large, then maybe the pit option will struggle. So if its large, then:.

    Ive a worm septic & sand filter that had the be constructed down hill on where the drip line trenches are 80 meters away...so it has to be automatically pumped triggered by the float on a sump pump. Has worked really well over the last 7 years.

    So would it be feasible to have a small tank with a sump pump capturing the aggi drainage and pump it to the street gutter?
    And thinking further given you dont have storm water draining away, it could be expanded to capture all your storm water. ...or for the roof gutter disposal, use Phara's suggestion of a charged system

    ...With a bigger tank you could then harvest the water for gardens, lawns and pump the excess to the street gutter.

    Obviously if you can design a solution without moving parts would be ideal but thought I'd throw this in the mix.

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