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Downlight Guards

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  1. #1
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    Default Downlight Guards

    Apart from the Isolite Guards does anybody know of other brands/makes ? As my new house will have over 50 downlights with the potential cost for guards being over $1,000 I'm looking for all possibilities. Thanks

  2. #2
    4K Club Member OBBob's Avatar
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    Are you referring to the back of the light in side the roof space?

    If so I'm sure there was a previous thread on that. People were using PVC pipe or nothing (just keeping the insulation clear) or even old flower pots with teh base cut off.

  3. #3
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    Thanks OBBob. They're feasible/practical solutions.

  4. #4
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    Try 150mm terracotta plant pots.

    enlarge the base hole, then cover with aluminum based fly wire.

    You then place the d/l in the middle of the up turned pot and insulate around the pot.
    This provides you with 150mm clearance as required.
    Total cost about $5. A lot safer than PVC/Plastic. The fly mesh stops bugs getting into the light fitting.

    If they are 12V halogens seriously consider converting them to 240V compact Fluros. This will reduce power output considerably as well as reduce the amount of excess heat.

  5. #5
    ajt
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    What type of insulation material are you using?

    If you are using batts then you do not have to have a protective barrier around the light fitting, however there are minimum distances that the insulation must be from the light fitting, 50mm from any part includig the transformer.

    If it is a loose fill type of insulation then you must have a fire proof barrier around the light fittings (PVC pipe etc is not legal or effective)

    Omega power make a product called INSULGUARD which is fire resistant cardboard barrier, it is basically a cardboard box which comes in a flat pack, easy to install and not that expensive. You should pick them up for under $10 per piece MIDDY'S stock them.

    Hope this helps you.

  6. #6
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    A property I had in Cairns which was insulated with the recycled paper (almost like fluff), the company who insulated the roof used foil similar to the sarking used between concrete tiles and the trusses and stapled them into circles. These then provided a barrier between the insulation and the downlight.

    These are cheap and effective.

    Cheers
    Steve

  7. #7
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    Default

    We used to get our own downlight guards made up at a sheetmetal place. from memory we used to get them about 100mm high, and long enough that when looped they would be about 200mm in diameter. We just got a fold on each end, that would hook together and pinched it shut with pliers. We also used to fold the top slightly to make a platform for the transformer to sit on, keeping it in free air so it would stay cooler. I could try and make a paint diagram if that would make it clearer for you!

    Cheers, Dean

  8. #8
    Powered By Pastries anawanahuanana's Avatar
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    My only advice is make sure you use something! Changing a lamp in one of my kitchen lights (240v Halogens) I discovered that the nice insulation people carefully placed my previously cleared thermosealed batts tightly back around one of my light fittings when up there finishing a job they didn't last time they were here (another story!).Needless to say that there was a lot of melted plastic and blackened insulation on the back of the light fitting. Just glad the insulation is fireproof otherwise who knows what may have happened....
    "I'll find him for three. but I'll catch him, and kill him, for ten. For that you get the head, the tail, the whole damn thing......."

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