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How do I tell if I have 3 phase power?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Trav's Avatar
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    Default How do I tell if I have 3 phase power?

    Hi all

    I bought a centameter (see www.centameter.com.au for details). Its a device that measures power consumption.

    When I went to install it, I seem to have three cables coming from the meter to the power board. All three wires connect near the main switch on the board - one to the switch itself, and two to 'blank' circuits immediately next to the main switch. The photos show you what I mean.

    I've got a 15A GPO immediately beneath the circuit board, but I don't seem to have any other different power points anywhere.

    Does this mean I have three phase power? Or is it just wishful thinking.

    Also, a sparkie mentioned just after we bought the house that this was an industrial/commercial power board and that it already has residual current device installed. Is that the creamy box at the bottom right hand corner of the circuit box?

    Thanks

    Trav
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails power-board1.jpg   power-board2.jpg   power-board3.jpg  
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    1K Club Member journeyman Mick's Avatar
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    I seriously doubt you have 3 phase, unless that's some type of ganged switch. What sort of meter do you have? The box down the bottom is a RCD.

    Mick
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    Starter boban's Avatar
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    On that first photo, it looks as though he has three phases going into the main switch. Only two phases seem to be in use. In my old shed, I have a single visible lever switch that switches all three phases.

    How many wires come into your place and how many meters do you have? If you have four wires coming in, then you have three phases. Three active and one neutral.

    All you have to do is look for the source wires. They are the ones that go to the main switch.

    Show us a picture inside your meter box.

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    Golden Member nev25's Avatar
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    It looks to me that you do have 3 Phase
    I'm a bit curious about the switch board and where it is and why so many circuits.
    If you never stated that its on your house I would have said it was a town hall or something Commercial

    Without being there and tracing wires I cannot tell what that RCD is protecting.
    I would get a sparkie in to take a look and to get him to install the Centameter

    He will also be able to look at the mains box to tell if you have 3 phase.

    BTW do you realize by taking the cover off the switchboard you have broken the law and could be subject to prosecution

  5. #5
    Apprentice (new member) Sideshow's Avatar
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    You have a three phase main switch - incoming supply is connected at the bottom, outgoing circuits feed out from the top. All three phases appear to be in use - two cables feed the copper busbars to the right of the board and the third phase is directly connected to the left most copper busbar (you can see it connect into the main switch).

    A certain way to tell if you have three phase is to look at the supply authority's meter - three phase meters are easily distinguished from single phase. Post a photo if you're not sure. Alternatively, check where the supply connects to your house - three fuses = three phase. This only works for overhead supply though.

    I can't make out the writing on the escutcheon plate, but from all appearances you don't have any three phase outlets - all the breakers appear to be single phase.

    In short, this is a good thing - installation of three phase outlets etc would be relatively straightforward so long as your mains have the capacity to carry the extra load. A sparky will be able to determine what's what. You appear to have the physical capacity to instal three phase circuit breaker in the lower panel.

    Nev25 - are you sure that removing the escutcheon is illegal? I wasn't aware of that. - Is that AS3000, or other?

    Cheers.

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    All i can say is that is a mess obviously ole mate who installed has never used cable ties in his life the unit down the bottom may be an rcd but it could also be an rcbo combination rcd/circuit breaker! be very careful of what you are doing there you have taken the escutcheon cover off the Sub-board and have exposed "live parts" these are Moulded Case Circuit breakers and a triple pole main switch looks like old school quicklag or Heinman Breakers strange to be in a residential apllication or is this a block of flats? Still a mess though!

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    Starter boban's Avatar
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    I see what you are saying Sideshow.

    Are those copper busbars still commonly used? I haven't ever seen them before. I thought they just used 2.5mm2 to feed the circuits.

    Given that I am not a sparky, I am not surprised.

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    Diamond Member Barry_White's Avatar
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    I think you will find that they are Quicklag circuit breakers and if they are the supply comes into the top of the circuit breaker.

    If you trace the wires and the busbars on the top you would find each bank on the CB are fed by a different cable.

    Then if you look at the Triple pole CB you can see where it is fed from the different feeds and the last bank on the left is feeding the right pole on the triple pole CB with the busbar.

    So that means all poles on the Triple CB are in use.

    So any sparky's would realize that the tops of the CB's are all connected in banks so that is where the feed is going in. Also all the cables at the top are larger than the cables coming out of the bottom of the CB's which means some of them are probably light circuits.

    So Trav you must have something in your house that is running three phase but as the others have said get a sparky to set it up and in compliance with the forum no further advice will be given.
    Regards Bazza

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  9. #9
    Apprentice (new member) Sideshow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_White View Post
    I think you will find that they are Quicklag circuit breakers and if they are the supply comes into the top of the circuit breaker.

    If you trace the wires and the busbars on the top you would find each bank on the CB are fed by a different cable.

    Then if you look at the Triple pole CB you can see where it is fed from the different feeds and the last bank on the left is feeding the right pole on the triple pole CB with the busbar.

    So that means all poles on the Triple CB are in use.

    So any sparky's would realize that the tops of the CB's are all connected in banks so that is where the feed is going in. Also all the cables at the top are larger than the cables coming out of the bottom of the CB's which means some of them are probably light circuits.

    So Trav you must have something in your house that is running three phase but as the others have said get a sparky to set it up and in compliance with the forum no further advice will be given.
    I agree Mr White, this could be one interpretation - I looked at the marking on the escutcheon, which I couldn't quite make out - the single phase breakers are numbered, the three phase is not and I interpreted the label as main switch. I thought the lugged connections would probably be feeding the board below, didn't interpret these as the supply. Also, went off the size of the SDI's - that's a big current draw if it's feeding something as opposed to being a supply.

    Could go either way (three phase supply main switch or three phase breaker), good example of needing a first hand look rather than going off the photos. In any case - he's definitely got three phase .

    Trav - what happens when you turn off the switch on the left? Lose everything or just one piece of equipment?

  10. #10
    Senior Member NCArcher's Avatar
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    Hi Trav,
    Yes I'm a sparkie. Yes you have 3 phase power.
    The 3 SDI (Single Double Insulated) cables come from the meter and connect to the bottom of the 3 phase main switch.
    Copper bus bars connect the tops of the circuit breakers together and the individual cables run from the bottom of the CB's to the light and power circuits. You have no 3 phase outlets or equipment installed.
    The 3 cables connected to the copper bus bars supply the board extension mounted under the main board.
    The bus bars you have exposed by removing the cover are alive at 415V. Be very careful. I had a bit of a read about the centameter and it does not require hard wiring. However I strongly recommend that you get your friendly local sparkie to install it for you. Messing around in the switchboard is not a good idea. If it is installed incorrectly it will not work and may become a hazard by reducing the clearances required from live parts to the metal casing of the switch board. It shouldn't take more than 1/2 hr or cost more than an hours labour (assuming minimum time charge)
    With the money saved on electricity consumption through the centameter it's worth paying a few dollars to have it installed properly and safely.
    Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelms. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

  11. #11
    Starter boban's Avatar
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    The first CB looks to be marked "main switch" although it is not entirely clear. If it is, then it appears logical that the feed is from the bottom (where the wires are still coated in the TPS). From there it is coming out and feeding each bus bar. Then there seem to be lugs supplying the lower circuit bank.

    Hey guys, do they still use those copper bus bars?

    Edit: just wasted my time as Archer has pretty much said what I was thinking.

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    Yes bob they still use insulated copper busbars pending on the installation requirements this board is an absolute disgrace!

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    Golden Member nev25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideshow View Post


    Nev25 - are you sure that removing the escutcheon is illegal? I wasn't aware of that. - Is that AS3000, or other?
    Yeah Ill try to find the reg when I get a chance
    Its something like having to use a tool to remove a cover that will expose live conductors must be done by a qualified person


    Patty looks looks a standard wiring job to me


    Bit concerning what the RCD is supplying

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    Patty looks looks a standard wiring job to me
    All I can say is if I wired a board like that I would have had my ???? kicked I know how tight for space some of these boards are to work on and it does make it difficult to keep cables neat the phases are not clearly identifaible as far as colour coding it looks as though the conduits do not have any actual terminators entering the board just to me it comes down to pride in workmanship if you call this standad I call it sub standard!

  15. #15
    Senior Member Trav's Avatar
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    Hi all

    Thanks for the advice.

    We're definitely getting a sparkie to install the centameter now. If it was a simple job, I was going to give it a go, but given the mess inside the box, I think we'll get a pro.

    The centameter measures the magnetic current flowing through the cables to determine power use. All you need to do is clip the sensor over the insulated wires (ie don't need to remove the insulation).

    I needed to work out whether it is three phase, as I need to get two more sensors (ie one for each phase).

    I don't think we have any 3 phase appliances or switches in the house - the hot water or the duted heating would be the only options.

    Thanks everyone for the advice. I thought I mihgt post a review of the centameter on here if anyone is interested.

    Trav
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    you don't neccessarily need to get two more centameters.

    If the sparky who originally wired the board bothered to bring three phases in, they may be balanced reasonably equally, eg fairly equal maximum demands. Just using one centameter would give an indication per phase, and you could multiply by three to get a rough idea of the total amps being drawn. If you were to purchase the centameters to have ready for the sparky, get him to measure the current drawn per phase and if they are roughly equal, only install one, then get a refund on the spare units.

    alternatively, a three phase centmeter may be available, with a single display, three current transformers [the coil which goes around the conductors] and a switch to choose which phase the display will show the current for. This may be cheaper [or more convenient space wise] then two more units.

    I'd recommend a major board upgrade if any renovations are to be done in the future. It probably wouldn't be too hard to terminate the existing circuits to terminal strips [if ther isn't much length spare] in an existing cabinet, then run them through breakers and rcds in a vertical mounted board adjacent.

    An as others have said, this is a sub par installation. I'm an apprentice, and I would be disppointed if my work looked like.

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    wood welder
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    can you post a photo of the fuses and/or the feed up on your roof?

  18. #18
    Senior Member Trav's Avatar
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    Thanks for the comments.

    The centameter is already equipped to deal with three phases - all I need is two more sensors, which I've now ordered. It simply adds the power consumtion across all three phases.

    I can arrange a photo of where the power from the pole reaches the house if that is helpful. I'm not sure how it gets from that end of the house to the circuit board you see, as the house is a flat roof. I will investigate more over the weekend and report.

    Thanks again

    Trav
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    Senior Member Trav's Avatar
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    I had a look at the power cable joining the house last night. It was a bit dark, but it appears there are three cables, twisted together, from the pole to the house. As it approaches the house, the are split apart and join the house separately - ie each one goes through one of those ceramic 'bells' before entering into the roof cavity.

    I presume, from this, that it is definitely three phase.

    Incidently, what does a three phase power point look like? Is it essentially the same as a GPO, or is it some great big industrial contraption with a flip-shut lid? Any photos?

    Cheers

    Trav
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    Senior Member NCArcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trav View Post
    ie each one goes through one of those ceramic 'bells' before entering into the roof cavity.
    The 'ceramic bells' are the service fuses.

    I presume, from this, that it is definitely three phase.
    Yes it is definately 3 phase

    Incidently, what does a three phase power point look like? Is it essentially the same as a GPO, or is it some great big industrial contraption with a flip-shut lid? Any photos?
    Big industrial contraption with a flip shut lid pretty much sums them up.
    Something like this
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails c1889.jpg  
    Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelms. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

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    1K Club Member Wood Butcher's Avatar
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    If there are only three wires then it is not three phase. Three phase has four wires (the three phases plus neutral) . Also those ceramic bells are not necessarily to be service fuses, but just insulators. Service fuses are normally located on the pole where the supply comes from.
    Have a nice day - Cheers


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    Diamond Member Barry_White's Avatar
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    Trav

    Just because you have three phase it doesn't mean you have anything that is operating on three phase. It may just mean that all your circuits are spread across the three phases and give you depending on the size of your mains coming in to have more capacity than if you had single phase.

    What it does mean is that it gives you the capacity to get some great three phase workshop toys.

    Woodbutcher in NSW at least the service fuse can either be on the supply pole or at the point of attachment on the house.

    As Woodbutcher says if it is three phase there should be four wires coming in unless the neutral is hiding some where.
    Regards Bazza

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatirwinfella View Post
    you don't neccessarily need to get two more centameters.

    If the sparky who originally wired the board bothered to bring three phases in, they may be balanced reasonably equally, eg fairly equal maximum demands. Just using one centameter would give an indication per phase, and you could multiply by three to get a rough idea of the total amps being drawn. If you were to purchase the centameters to have ready for the sparky, get him to measure the current drawn per phase and if they are roughly equal, only install one, then get a refund on the spare units.

    alternatively, a three phase centmeter may be available, with a single display, three current transformers [the coil which goes around the conductors] and a switch to choose which phase the display will show the current for. This may be cheaper [or more convenient space wise] then two more units.

    I'd recommend a major board upgrade if any renovations are to be done in the future. It probably wouldn't be too hard to terminate the existing circuits to terminal strips [if ther isn't much length spare] in an existing cabinet, then run them through breakers and rcds in a vertical mounted board adjacent.

    An as others have said, this is a sub par installation. I'm an apprentice, and I would be disppointed if my work looked like.
    lol yeah the guy that did that beautiful worked balanced the phases perfectly
    You suggested replacing the board? Why he has 13 poles not being used atm that I can count.
    The circuit breakers used are high qaulity breakers and will last almost forever in a domestic enviroment.
    The only problem this man will have with this board is getting extra breakers as they will cost probably 3 times the price of std breakers or more...
    The biggest newest plastic domestic type board would not compare to a what he has atm sorry.
    Keep what you have and dont worry about the mess inside as long as everything is terminated correctly. The fact all the cables are a little long is good imho as they allow your sparky to reconfigure what you have if need be.
    If your after breakers call your local industrial sparky and see if he has any he wants to sell!
    When we scrap older boards like this we normally keep 6 or 8 of each cb size and throw them on the shelf in the factory for when we do work on another building or another area and need to install one of these type breakers.
    my 2 cents
    cheers Rileyp

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wood Butcher View Post
    If there are only three wires then it is not three phase. Three phase has four wires (the three phases plus neutral) . Also those ceramic bells are not necessarily to be service fuses, but just insulators. Service fuses are normally located on the pole where the supply comes from.
    Service fuses on ActewAGL LV feeds are NOT on the pole!!!!!!!! Those bell thingies are the fuses holders, superceded now by single use plastic holders. Actew supplies a direct live feed to fuses on the roof (or to the meter box on newer underground feeds).

    In the ACT if there are three bells then chances are it's 3 phase connected. The neutral does not pass through a bell on a 3 phase hookup.

    You can have a 3 phase core on a single phase connection but split the active and neutral over two cores each. In this case there will be either one or two bells.

  25. #25
    1K Club Member Wood Butcher's Avatar
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    Service fuses on ActewAGL LV feeds are NOT on the pole!!!!!!!!
    Well sorry but there regularly are in queensland! I never said they definately weren't fuses.
    Have a nice day - Cheers


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    Quote Originally Posted by Wood Butcher View Post
    Well sorry but there regularly are in queensland! I never said they definately weren't fuses.
    Didnt mean to be blunt. Apologies and man hugs.

    we are talking about an ACT install and ActewAGL is the relevant supply authority. I know NSW also have pole mounted fuses and I'm sure other states do too but ill refrain from speculating on codes I'm not familiar with. I just think it can be a bit dangerous if someone could be led to believe that a feed to their house could be dropped without either a physical disconnection from your LV supply pole or a local service outage.

    Basically in Canberra if your house is wire up and your neighbours lights are on, then, chances are, your roof has live terminals on it.

    I did forget to mention that the neutral is usually just crimped and taped underneath the fuses in my previous post. More man hags for all concerned

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    Quote Originally Posted by rileyp View Post
    If your after breakers call your local industrial sparky and see if he has any he wants to sell!

    I wouldn't worry about buying These CB under the new regs they would be allowed to be installed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nev25 View Post
    I wouldn't worry about buying These CB under the new regs they would be allowed to be installed.
    please explain?
    I just put 10 of them in a hospital about 3 months ago for mechanical services.
    Those breakers are everywhere!

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    As far as i know you can still use them though in domestic you must provide a seperate RCD for power and lighting circuits (which looks like is there). We use those "quicklag" puppies all the time in industrial jobs and they last forever and normally fit quick and easily into a DB with a buss bar system.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rileyp View Post
    please explain?
    Went to an info session on thee the new AS/NZ3000/2007 Regulations the other night
    And we where told every circuit mush have its own RCD
    We can no longer protect many circuits with one RCD

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    Was that just for domestic situations or for industry as well? At the moment in industry you dont even need to have an RCD. IMOA seperate RCD's are the way to go anyway saves reseting all the bloody clocks if the toaster trips it.... you only have to reset half.

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    Default RCDs

    Clause 2.6.2.4 - Arrangement of RCDs
    Where RCDs are required by the Standard, not more than 3 final sub circuits shall be protected by any one RCD. Where the number of RCDs installed exceeds one, and more than one lighting final sub circuit is installed, then the lighting circuits shall be distributed between the RCDs. In domestic installations having more than one final sub circuit, a minimum of two RCDs shall be installed.
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    so 3 circuits per rcd.
    That means the board is fine although he may need to add another rcd or 2 underneath
    (rcd enclosure $5) and rcd itself $40
    New board would have to be $500 and up to match what he has plus installation cost.
    And even then the breakers would never be as good.
    I rest my case.

  34. #34
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    Thats interesting we where told different at the Briefing the other Night
    (Or maybe I heard wrong )
    They did say they where trying to do is get way from a faulty appliance taking out the whole house

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    I think all you guys are missing the point the golden rule is all supply authorities have their own set of local rules and guidelines and they vary from council to council !

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    Quote Originally Posted by patty View Post
    I think all you guys are missing the point the golden rule is all supply authorities have their own set of local rules and guidelines and they vary from council to council !

    Yeah but the info night I'm referring to was put on by chief electrical inspector

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    thats it nev 25 he was an inspector but from what energy authority?your in Victoria mate, it really does not matter about states, i was working in newcastle then we went to work in sydney, and the local regulations guidelines differ slightly on what you can and cannot do! mainly talking from and distribution and metering point of view One of my mates also a spark went to West Australia to work and the nonsense he went to be able to perform elect work was unbelievable!The min sized consumer mains domestic situation you are allowed to run in our local supply not long ago was 16mm nothing less I still think that is the case it did not go on max demand, i also remeber it was common practice to earth the supply authority neutral also in this area then they changed it to earthing the consumer neutral instead another was the the min sized earth to a domestic earth stake was 6 mm they changed it to 16mm whilst these were common practice in our area at the time,no other supply authority in other areas at the time adopted these changes! As i stated different regulation for different LOCAL supply authorities

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    I think you guys are set up differently than us in Vic
    The chief Electrical Inspector
    Governs the whole kit and caboodle Including the supply authority

    Yeah I come across a new house a week or so ago with a 16mm2 earth
    I asked another sparkie why (as I have never seen it before) he said he had but it was some sort of earthing system the is buried in the ground (as apposed to a stake driven in) and very rarely used here
    I'm still trying find more info


    Gee how did you attach a 16mm2 earth to the earth stake I have enough trouble with 6mm2 at the best of times?

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    Attaching 16mm2 is a bitch... normally it takes at least three hands to get it done plus a little swearing i find can help as well.

    Interesting in the new rules (2.6.3.4 very basically) if you add a socket outlet to an existing circuit then you need to add the RCD.(unless a lighting circuit) there is no different rules for industrial work. Looks like i had better stock up on the quicklag RCD/CB's. (Well that is the way i interpret it anyway)

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    Even in Victoria the local supply authority looks after metering set ups and things do change from one area to another.
    I would imagine 16mm earths being used due to poor earthing conditions.
    ie... the ground is dry she no conduct
    If you are on a rural propery and supplied via swer tranny
    You need a good earth or all your lights dim and stay dim till you hose around the pole transformer.
    A method of alleviating this situation is to use a grid in the ground rather than a solitary stake.
    I would imagine in dryer parts to get a good earth on standard 2 wire supply a grid may be demanded by the supply authority in case of a fault.
    All it would take is a dry year and a few earth faults on installations that went unnoticed until it rained /earth stake hosed around that was brought to the attention of the supply authority and they would mandate it as necessary.

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    16mm2 earth also needs to be used to earth conductive materials to the earthng point where an unprotected consumers main passes through any conductive materials . Actually i think it has to match the cross sectional are of the supply or something...(going from memory) unsless the cross section area is greater due to voltage drop.....

    These new rules at leat have a index in them that helps not like th old 2000 ones

  42. #42
    Golden Member nev25's Avatar
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    Maybe we need a new thread on the new wiring regs??


    Quote Originally Posted by another termite View Post
    Interesting in the new rules (2.6.3.4 very basically) if you add a socket outlet to an existing circuit then you need to add the RCD
    Yeah this IMO is going to cause a few problems
    The Customer rings me up and says she wants a new GPO installed in her lounge room.
    She has semi enclosed rewire-able fuses
    Its going to cost he a new switchboard possibly $700 up-wards.
    Or (as we where told) RCD GPOs but they still cost around $130
    I know what the customer is going to say.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nev25 View Post
    Yeah this IMO is going to cause a few problems
    The Customer rings me up and says she wants a new GPO installed in her lounge room.
    She has semi enclosed rewire-able fuses
    Its going to cost he a new switchboard possibly $700 up-wards.
    Or (as we where told) RCD GPOs but they still cost around $130
    I know what the customer is going to say.
    You could just add one RCD for that circuit, they only say you have to add it to the circuit you work on nothing about any of the others.

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    forgot to add.... maybe a new thread is a good idea

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    Gentlemen, I don't believe that the OP mentioned anything about additions or alterations. Nonetheless, if he feels that he may like to replace his distribution board, I could not find anything in the latest regs that indicates the need to purchase additional RCD's. Please note clause 2.6.3.4.


    2.6.2.4 Arrangement.
    Where additional protection of final subcircuits is required, in accordance
    with Clause 2.6.3, the fin.....


    2.6.3 Where additional protection is required.
    2.6.3.1 Residential electrical installations.
    Exceptions:
    2. This requirement need not apply to certain alterations, additions or repairs in accordance with Clause 2.6.3.4.


    2.6.3.4 Alterations, additions and repairs.
    Socket-outlets that are added to an existing circuit shall be protected by an RCD.
    Exception: The requirements of Clauses 2.6.3.1 and 2.6.3.2 need not apply to the following:
    (a) Where socket-outlets or lighting points that are not RCD-protected are replaced, including the replacement of a single socket-outlet with a multiple socket-outlet assembly.
    (b) Extensions to final subcircuits supplying lighting points only, provided that the existing final subcircuit is not RCD-protected.


    The way I see it, even if the OP replaces his distribution board, he will not need to purchase & install any new RCD's PROVIDING that he is not in breach of any part of 2.6.3.4.

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    I am pretty sure that if he upgrades the switchboard you will find that he has to do so in line with the current regulations. So if he doesnt have enough RCD's to meet 2.6.4.2 then new ones will need to be purchased.
    2.6.3.4 is only if he is adding to existing circuits not replacing the whole S/B... well that is how i interpret it anyway.

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    If I added a gpo to a house I would bring the whole house up to scratch or decline the job.
    I dont do domestic work as Im firmly entrenched in constrcution.
    I have fixed a few domestic houses but thats just me.
    I started my apprenticeship in 1990 and that what I have always understood to be the deal.
    Its no great loss if its only the circuit that needed be upgraded as Ive only done 2 or 3 houses.
    I think its better that way anyway.
    Gets rid off all these houses with old wiring and brand new gpos sitting on the wall.

    Btw could a mod please cut and paste half this thread into a new thread named "aussie wiring regs"
    cheers
    Rileyp

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    Btw could a mod please cut and paste half this thread into a new thread named "aussie wiring regs"
    cheers
    Rileyp

    As stated before and dont get me wrong RileyP I love finding out what other sparks do in their areas but local rules overwrite other regulations in some circumstances and if we started a blog on this you would have your every day joe blows looking up the regs then after reading and researching having the confidence to go and do their own work which is exactly what none of us want!<!-- / message -->

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    Yeah I was thinking about starting a forum site Just for electricians
    The site would have to be password protected and members would have to prove they are a sparkie to get membership

    Only problem is the cost of setting it up

    Any thoughts

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    As stated before and dont get me wrong RileyP I love finding out what other sparks do in their areas but local rules overwrite other regulations in some circumstances and if we started a blog on this you would have your every day joe blows looking up the regs then after reading and researching having the confidence to go and do their own work which is exactly what none of us want!
    I agree totally local supply authority regs overrule as3000 but in general these regs are assosiated with supply and metering arrangements only.
    I dont see why electrical talk regarding regulations has to be secret sparky business.
    Anyone can buy as3000 if they choose.Its just whether they wish to cross that line.
    The line is there regardless of how much they know and they know the line is there
    Im allowed to read about woodwork and how to use a circular saw and nail gun.
    I can go and build whatever I choose but bottom line is unless it has council approval its illegal ( when it comes to housing extensions etc.)Electrical work is no different. If someone chooses to read our wiring blog then gets electrocuted or wires up his brickshithouse its not the forums fault .Its his for not following the law of the land that states all electrical wiring work must be performed by a licenced electrician.
    I understand your point about joe bloe and arming him with a wealth of information he may not otherwise gain but that is what the internet is all about...getting information you may never of had and its fantastic isnt it!
    I dont think its the mods job on this forum to police what is said and not said about electical wiring work in Australia as long as we are not naming business's or particular people why cant we talk regs?
    Im sure theres plenty of sites on the net on how to best grow dope or how to get the best kick out of whateva the kids are sniffing these days.... and no one is getting sued.
    Its just freedom of information.
    So can we talk regs in our own thread?
    A simple no will suffice and Ill rest my case

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