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Induction cooktops power use

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  1. #1
    fool
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    Default Induction cooktops power use

    These cooktops seem to be all the rage now.
    Some chefs are claiming them to be more efficient than gas or electric equivelants.
    In what way?
    I've just been looking at Miele's website(as an example thats all), there induction cooktop needs a 10.6Kw supply Would this also mean a big power upgrade?
    The only thing I can see efficient about them is that they only heat the pan, so don't waste heat, don't cook up the house etc.hence there 'efficient'.
    Do they work like a microwave or chinese water cooled wok range and do the job in an instant?

    check it out here http://www.miele.com.au/au/domestic/...dels_17195.htm

    Anybody use one of these cooktops?

    I'm just looking at it from a sustainability aspect

    cheers

    Gravy

  2. #2
    Old Chippy 6K
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    By far the most efficient cooktop available today. Efficiency (ie use of energy at point of use) is at around 86% gas is at around 39% regular hotplates around 33% new fast element ceramics at around 41%.

    That rating is not all that high - about the same as my regular solid plate cook top with 5 elements. You'll not that the rated power of each cook top is also much higher than most regular stoves - which usually a couple at 1100-1200W one at 1600-1800 and one at 2200-2300W. The rating is about capacity to operate with all elements at full power - not a common occurrence and no indicator of the amount or power likely to be used. Induction takes less time to heat up and cool down and gives greatest control, heats the pot not the stove.

    Main downside is cost and that will come down as more get sold. A to your sustainability question- induction is the current best choice especially if you are a GreenPower purchaser and even more so if you have solar PV (which not many do of course).

  3. #3
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    Also need to get compatible cookware, only magnetic materials will work.
    They work but inducing a very string magnetic current in the pan that generates heat,
    you won't even get close to water cooled Chinese Wok burner, they generate around 150Mj that's 15 times more than the average "wok" burner on a normal gas stove.

    Nic

  4. #4
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    We got one. In the early days is caught the wife out several times and things boiled over.

    Ours is a Whirlpool, can't remember the exact price but it was a hell of a lot cheaper than all the fancy named brands, and it was made in Italy (probably in the same factory as the fancy names.

  5. #5
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicm View Post
    Also need to get compatible cookware, only magnetic materials will work.
    They work but inducing a very strong magnetic current in the pan that generates heat,
    you won't even get close to water cooled Chinese Wok burner, they generate around 150Mj that's 15 times more than the average "wok" burner on a normal gas stove.

    Nic
    Nic makes a good point - all-aluminium implements will not work on induction cookers. Plenty of choices around now though that are induction capable. You will not have any problem with using a wok on induction (although that wasn't you question) - but has to be one with a forged flat base.

    I have used the new Scanpan induction wok and it is brilliant - far better than my old quite large wok burner. Few people would want, need or evn be able to safely use a commercial style wok burner - they are nasty beasts and although cook quickly are very wasteful of energy. Not a choice for someone interested in sustainability - induction tops are.

    The wiki article covers it quite well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_cooking and this one has some good info (although they do sell induction cookers!) http://theinductionsite.com/

  6. #6
    Golden Member GraemeCook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloss View Post
    I have used the new Scanpan induction wok and it is brilliant - far better than my old quite large wok burner. Few people would want, need or evn be able to safely use a commercial style wok burner - they are nasty beasts and although cook quickly are very wasteful of energy. Not a choice for someone interested in sustainability - induction tops are.

    Thanks, Bloss. You have got me thinking again. We have a long term plan to do a total kitchen makeover, if we ever agree on what to do, and it must include a wok burner; we were thinking of a gas cooktop and an electric oven.

    A Chinese friend is a very good cook and we enjoyed many excellent wok-cooked meals there. Then they bought a restaurant and found that they cooked better in the restaurant than at home - commercial wok burners taste better! So they bought a multi-ringed gas wokburner from BBQs Galore - it has four hoses to the gas bottle - and their home cooking went up a big notch. Their old wokburner was 15 megajoules, the new one is 50 mjls.

    In my research for my new kitchen the largest domestic wokburner that I have found is 18mjls - commercial wokburners seem to range from 100 to 400 megajoules. That's a lot of difference in heat output. And the safety rules are different for commercial as opposed to domestic equipment.

    As my Chinese friend says - "If something takes longer than 60 seconds in a wok then you are boiling it, not stir-frying." I have tried using the woks in his restaurant, they really are firey beasts - you have to hand-hold the wok to keep it and the contents moving all the time and the meal is ready in 50-60 seconds. I cannot create that taste at home. But five seconds of inattention and dinner is burnt.

    Cheers

    Graeme

  7. #7
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    thanks everyone for the replies.
    So is the induction hob cheaper to run than gas?
    Obviosly the induction is the way to go if your home is all electric.
    My wok burner on the gas stove is almost completely useless.

    cheers

    gravy

  8. #8
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    I have 50Mj gas burner, I use when cooking with the wok. Absolutely correct the food does taste different, you get the "restaurant" kind of taste you can't get otherwise.
    That said , the problems are:

    -Dangerous as hell ,50Mj burners will burn hairs, skin ... in a flash
    -You need a commercial range hood to evacuate the heat/smoke and flames generated by cooking, any consumer range hood will melt.
    -You need a traditional Chinese steel wok, which means more maintenance, oiling, cleaning unless you cook every day with it.
    -Oh and really dangerous ...

    Good luck

    Nic

  9. #9
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gravy258 View Post
    So is the induction hob cheaper to run than gas?
    Obviously the induction is the way to go if your home is all electric.
    gravy
    Yes and Yes and even if now have gas . . . (if you can afford the initial higher cost.

  10. #10
    Golden Member GraemeCook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicm View Post
    I have 50Mj gas burner, I use when cooking with the wok. Absolutely correct the food does taste different, you get the "restaurant" kind of taste you can't get otherwise.
    That said , the problems are:

    -Dangerous as hell ,50Mj burners will burn hairs, skin ... in a flash
    -You need a commercial range hood to evacuate the heat/smoke and flames generated by cooking, any consumer range hood will melt.
    -You need a traditional Chinese steel wok, which means more maintenance, oiling, cleaning unless you cook every day with it.
    -Oh and really dangerous ...

    Good luck

    Nic
    Thanks Nic. They are firey beasts.

    By way of interest, what type of wok burner do you have? Apart from the above, how have you found it.

    Cheers

    Graeme


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