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Remote LPG shut off

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  1. #1
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    Default Remote LPG shut off

    I am planning to change my cooking range from electric to LPG.

    The place for the bottle is downstairs and i don't want to have to go down each time I want to shut off the bottle.
    Most boats have a remote LPG shut off valve actioned by 12V so I thought one of those would be just the ticket.

    What I don't know is what happens if you have a power outage, which we experience more often than not. Can those valves be opened manually?
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  2. #2
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    This would be something like an inline solenoid activated shut off/on device. Readily available at any gas shop. In the event of a power loss you might have to manually open a bypass though.

    Have you contacted you local gas suplier, they will give the options.
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  3. #3
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    I like gas cooking a lot but if you haven't already, consider the induction cookers. I have a cheap ebay one and would rather have this than gas simply because they are fast and have timer and temperature 'set and forget' controls. But it is not the type of cooker to slam your pots down on.

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    Agree that induction cookers are worth a look.

    Regarding the shut-off device, if you want it fail safe in case of a power interruption then you need a solenoid valve that is only open when the power is on. That way, in a power fail situation the gas would be off. If you don't want the fail safe operation, you would want a solenoid valve that is open when the power is off.

    Bet there are regulations about this!

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  5. #5
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    I'm getting confused here. You're on a boat but have power outages?

    The boat is on land or permanently in port and connected to mains power? Or you have a generator / batteries on the boat that aren't reliable?


  6. #6
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    Ok, thank you for the replies. Cooking ... there is nothing like cooking with gas. How can I make a simile you relate to? Lets say it is like an electric Makita chainsaw compared to a 660 Stihl chainsaw with a 30" bar ... give or take an inch or two. ... if they make a makita chainsaw that is brushless and that sings la cucaracha as you cut, it will still be ... well an electric chainsaw.

    Boat ... a search found me lpg shut down valves used on boats. But no I don't live on a boat. I wouldn't mind though it would be a bummer to fit my workshop on it.

    Shutdown solenoid ... when I leave home just like when you stop using your barbecue I like to shut down the LPG cylinder. if it was under the bench I would just reach there and turn it off, easy. However I don't want to have the bottle in the house, I'll have it downstairs next to the water tank, where the generator and the water pump live.
    I have a remote switch for my water pump so when I leave home no one can empty my tank by leaving a tap open in the backyard.
    Same applies to the LPG bottle. A remote switch to shut off the gas when not in use. Not a safety device even when it could also be wired that way I suppose.
    If there is no power, there is no remote switch so it will be open if it was open or shut if it was shut. So if I want to cook when there is no power, I will have to go down and open the gas manually. The question is, are this solenoid able to be opened by hand .. like with a lever or something, or will I have to plumb a bypass?

    A 12v operated valve could have a small battery backup, but I may be re-inventing the wheel here.
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  7. #7
    Resigned SilentButDeadly's Avatar
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    Solenoid choice depends on whether you want it normally open or normally closed. Personally, we just shut the valve on the bottle since is easily accessible which is essential given that it has to be so it can be refilled or replaced. By the by, regulations require that you have a tap in the line at or near the stove anyway...
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  8. #8
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    Have you considered placing a standard 240 Ac solenoid that you can switch on when there is power, and a secondary line from the feed side of the supply plumbe to your stove so you can manually turn it from the kitchen when there is no power available?
    Growing old is compulsory, growing up is not.
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  9. #9
    2K Club Member toooldforthis's Avatar
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    why does it have to be powered?
    can't you just have an in-line manual valve in the cupboard? similar to the one at the bottle that is used when replacing the bottle?

  10. #10
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    Yes, I understand I need to have a 1/4 turn ball valve at the stove. Somehow I thought that closing the gas at the bottle would be a better choice when leaving the house.
    Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance
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  11. #11
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    This is one of those "possible but not done in practice" things. I'm not saying you should or shouldn't, but I've never heard of anyone routinely turning the gas (either natural or LPG) off when leaving the house.

    The only time I turn it off is if going away for an extended period.

  12. #12
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    I neglected to say that it is a weekender.
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  13. #13
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    Now it makes sense.

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