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Any tips on creating this round deck?

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  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member) Aadbuild's Avatar
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    Default Any tips on creating this round deck?

    I have built many a deck yet not a full round deck with a hole in the middle that integrates into the main square deck with a step.
    The images show how the software that I use to estimate layed it out teh bearers and joist for me, can anyone give any input on a better way?
    round-deck-creation-plusdesignbuild.jpg
    beaers-joist-rim-beam.jpg
    Here is the BOQ and Cut list
    material-takeoff-cut-list-round-deck.jpg
    I used a program called PlusDesignBuild to do this, is anyone else using it?

  2. #2
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    Hi Aadbuild, please change your profile location to be more specific, state level as a minimum. It helps for advice (regs, services, products etc).


  3. #3
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    Seems to me the outer ring beam, which is shown as lots of segments, isn't going to provide sufficient support in its own right for some of the joists with longer cantilevers. I've marked {with red dots) the ends of those joists that I think will exceed cantilever limits. I would consider either supporting those ends on stirrups or double up those joists using vertical nail lamination (VNL) (the latter being less work).

    Re the centre ring, the left and right where the joists aren't full may be springy. Can you run another full joist either side and VNL? May need to move the joists shown, or have a smaller hole

    What is the largest span of the joists?

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails circle-deck.png  

  4. #4
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    That would be the perfect project to make a steam bent or laminated ring joist
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  5. #5
    Apprentice (new member) Aadbuild's Avatar
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    I agree bending the perimeter beam would be ideal and this way it would create like aload bearing perimtre beam/fascia that could be attached with joist hangers.
    I input 1800 maximum spacing into the software and the result is 1500 bearer spacing and canilver of roughly 1/3 of the back span.
    My main issue is the segemented perimeter beam though yet to get it steamed and bent woud oct mor ethan the budget allows.
    Maybe the best way is to increase the joist section size and bende 2x140x20 and laminate the curve. Maybe cut the back out of the timber like they make a guitar? Wont be easy.
    Quote Originally Posted by r3nov8or View Post
    Seems to me the outer ring beam, which is shown as lots of segments, isn't going to provide sufficient support in its own right for some of the joists with longer cantilevers. I've marked {with red dots) the ends of those joists that I think will exceed cantilever limits. I would consider either supporting those ends on stirrups or double up those joists using vertical nail lamination (VNL) (the latter being less work).

    Re the centre ring, the left and right where the joists aren't full may be springy. Can you run another full joist either side and VNL? May need to move the joists shown, or have a smaller hole

    What is the largest span of the joists?


  6. #6
    Apprentice (new member) Aadbuild's Avatar
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    Yep agreed

  7. #7
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    I have seen boat builders bend large sections of timber by boiling them in a container made with a folded roof sheet and open fire under it. Then clamped against a mold, then boiled a bit more.
    Cost zero ... a bit of work though.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
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  8. #8
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Laminating to create curved beams is pretty straightforward if the radius is large enough and the laminations thin enough then no back just are necessary. BUT - the set up of the forming frame is non-trivial and needs an area larger than the deck itself (even if you made two or three segments the form will be large) and must be flat, stable and weather proof. The timber & glue selection is critical too. All that adds up to increased costs. Easier as said above to add more support posts for the bearers & joists and that allows the outer ring to be non-structural.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  9. #9
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloss View Post
    Laminating to create curved beams is pretty straightforward if the radius is large enough and the laminations thin enough then no back just are necessary. BUT - the set up of the forming frame is non-trivial and needs an area larger than the deck itself ...
    May be in theory.
    I have made many bent and laminated curved members, even spiral, and never had the need to build a secondary structure to form the timber. Why would you if you have the form right there.
    All that is required is a collection of offcuts to build sturdy L shaped brackets to clamp at every joist end and that is your forming frame. All you need is a ton of F clamps or G clamps orquick clamps or whatever you can lay your hands on ... 2 per bracket and in case of lamination one every 150mm. No trivial nor substantial form required.
    For bending hot, all is needed is a few sections of wide timber cut curved with a jigsaw, and a long container to boil water. Definitely a more venturous enterprise than laminating. Yet very satisfying ... after all, the only reason for doing something this way.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
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  10. #10
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
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    Products like AZEK Decking can be bent to form circles or whatever you can imagine, they use a heat blanket over the board, this softens it then you just manipulate it to the shape, before it hardens.
    Mieux vaut prévenir que guérir

  11. #11
    Old Chippy 6K
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    "trivial or substantial' are relative terms. I've been in building game >50 years - what I might do or you as an experienced DIYer might be quite different to a novice DIYer as the OP seems to be. I have enough clamps & other materials to do something substantial - few home DIYers do.

    IMO having access to 'All you need is a ton of F or G clamps' to place every 150mm or so is a non-trivial ask. The 'form' I am taking about is similar to Metrix's post - it just makes it easier, expecially if a single person. alway plenty fo different ways to do things - I was merely trying to point out it is big task ie: non-trivial. Regardless how you do it, it is at deck scale.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

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