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Concreting Stirrups for a Deck, with the Posts attached or Stirrups only?

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  1. #1
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    Default Concreting Stirrups for a Deck, with the Posts attached or Stirrups only?

    Even with substantial savings in labor costs, DIY deck installations done incorrectly might cost a fortune in wasted material.


    I like to visualise each step of an installation to make sure I know what I'm doing, and so that I can prepare for obstacles.


    A question I have is:

    Should I concrete the gal stirrups with posts attached or stirrups only?


    I'll allow 75mm for the stirrup height out of the ground.

    There'll be 9 stirrups/posts in total, 3 per row with each row supporting a bearer/s.

    Six stirrups will support 6 x 200mm high posts.

    Three stirrups will support three 2700mm high posts.

    The first row of stirrups will support a bearer.
    The second row of posts will support twin bearers.
    The third row of stirrups will support a bearer with the posts extending upwards to take a beam which will support the laserlight style roofing frame.


    I'm imagining that stirrups on there own are easier to concrete without the weight of the posts, but

    Stirrups with the posts attached might allow me to more accurately plumb them, particularly the longer ones.



    I was hoping to learn from your experience.


    Cheers.


    Rocky

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    Best way I have seen is to build and support the basic bearer and joist frame with posts attached, getting all level and plumb etc.
    Then attach the stirrups with them sitting in a hole and cast the footing around the stirrups...

    The 2700 might make this trickier but still would be my method of choice. This way you can save a heap of stress getting all the stirrups in line and at exactly the right height...

    The pros do it this way all the time here in the west with verandah roofs on new builds...

  3. #3
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    Do what’s easiest. I’m no deck builder, but…

    You might consider concreting a stirrup at each end, building (some of) your structure, then for the posts that lie midway, which can be bolted to what you have so far. They will be supported and concreting will be easy because they won’t move. You will have to look out that everything is straight and not sagging before you do your mid-post pour.

    I replaced a couple of posts to an existing deck recently. It was oh, so easy to bolt up the stirrup to the post, to everything else, then poured the concrete. In this case the post wasn’t going to move. It was a breeze.

    As a kid I built a fence and got into trouble. It was an all steel, modular arrangement. A good neighbour thing where it looks the same on both sides. They are still around the place. The instructions said to assemble the fence panels to the posts and then lift the fence into position and pour the concrete. What a mistake. Getting the panels vertical and in the right position was tricky, accounting for wind and people touching it was impossible.

    Make sure you have your posts cut as neatly and precisely at 90 degrees as you can. And if you are a perfectionist drill an indent in the end of the post to account for the rivet in the stirrup.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by David.Elliott View Post
    Best way I have seen is to build and support the basic bearer and joist frame with posts attached, getting all level and plumb etc.
    Then attach the stirrups with them sitting in a hole and cast the footing around the stirrups...

    The 2700 might make this trickier but still would be my method of choice. This way you can save a heap of stress getting all the stirrups in line and at exactly the right height...

    The pros do it this way all the time here in the west with verandah roofs on new builds...
    Thanks David.

    I envisaged the posts but adding the bearers makes sense in terms of squaring everything up before the footings cure.

    I'll aim to do mine this way as well.

  5. #5
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    Thanks E F.

    Good insights.

    Concreting the middle stirrup last will allow me to concentrate on two initial pours instead of three allowing me to work on getting everything square and to the correct height.

    Then, if I've prepared correctly, I can fix the lateral squareness by fitting the permanent braces, and the other vertical by screwing to temporary braces in place.

    Being inexperienced, by using my string lines, I can get one stirrups/posts/bearer concreted and installed, before tackling the middle section, and then end section.


    Importantly, I can plumb before concrete sets, particularly the longer posts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by David.Elliott View Post
    Best way I have seen is to build and support the basic bearer and joist frame with posts attached, getting all level and plumb etc.
    Then attach the stirrups with them sitting in a hole and cast the footing around the stirrups....

    It makes you wander what technique these guys employ.

    Maybe they use a laser to align the stirrups, but then why would every stirrup have a different height?


    http://www.renovateforum.com/attachm...ghts-image.jpg

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    Default Concreting Stirrups for a Deck, with the Posts attached or Stirrups only?

    Stirrups don't need to be level,the bearers and joists do.

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    Leaving the height out of it, you still have to align the stirrups on two planes for a neat job, which, for a relative novice, or me an amateur, will be harder than just digging the holes, building the frame, hanging the posts with the stirrups attached, and then dropping the concrete in...

  9. #9
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    Build double bearers for all 3.
    Dig holes.
    Check and bolt post to bearer, screw stirrup to post, place each bearer on bricks with the post and stirrup hanging in the hole.
    Level along the bearer and across with the other bearers packing with timber, plywood, fibro etc.
    Level again, use string to check alignment of all bearers, and level once more ...
    Stabilise the whole contraption with star pickets, you don't want to knock it during concreting.
    Mix your concrete and pour.

  10. #10
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    Thanks Marc.

    Never thought of holding the bearers on brick piles.

    Great idea and allows time to get everything square and positioned for the pour.


    Thanks Marc.

    Your experience makes all the difference to a make or break build for me.
    I'll gather the right materials and have plenty of bricks to make the structure stable.




    I've allowed double bearers (parallel to house) in the design along the middle row .



    Do you feel double bearers are critical to stability for all three rows of bearers, as I've only allowed single bearers on the first and third rows?

  11. #11
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    Well I haven't seen anything yet, but if you check the span table you will find that all bearers are double. I assume we are talking treated pine right?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Well I haven't seen anything yet, but if you check the span table you will find that all bearers are double. I assume we are talking treated pine right?
    Thanks for picking that up Marc.

    The current advice had been double bearers in centre span only.


    I've attached a sketch of the current version of the deck substructure.


    • TP MGP10 M3 (M4 posts).
    • 550mm high deck.
    • No ledger and will ultimately have 10 mm gap separating it from the house.
    • Bracing to provide lateral rigidity.





    Do you recommend double bearers for all three spans?

    Can you see any other concerns in the plan?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails deck-plan.pdf  

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