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Rldragon's New Deck

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  1. #1
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    Default Rldragon's New Deck

    I am doing my deck as well, it has the similar size 30m2 and L-shape as your. The long side is 9x2.4, and the short side is 4x1.8.
    The space between the deck and the ground from 220mm to 450mm.
    I am not good at the Google Sketchup, manager to get the concept design.
    I am using 2x140x45 as bear span at 1.75, and 140x45 as joist span at 2.4m and space 450mm centre fixed into the face of the bear using joist hanger. Decking board is 90x19 Merbau

    Footings: 300mm diameter x 500mm deep
    Stirrups: Pryda full stirrup anchors 100mm-600mm leg
    Bearers: 2x 140x45 Laminated MGP10 H3 treated pine, span at 1700mm, and sit direct on the Stirrups
    Joists: 140x45 MGP10 H3 treated pine, span at 2400 mm, spacing 450mm centre fixed into the face of the bear using joist hanger
    Decking: 90 x 19 Merbau - to be screwed down with the SS.

    Currently pricing as following
    Bearers: approx. 40LM x 6.85 = $270
    Joists: approx. 71LM x 6.85 = $490
    Decking: approx. 350LM x 3.95 = $1400
    Stirrups: $150
    Concrete: $200(40 bag 20kg for 15 hole)
    joist hanger: 30 x$2 = 60
    Mounting hardware for stirrups/joist hanger: $200
    Decking screws: $200 from ebay (including 1500 10-12G 304 SS and smart bit)
    Tool hire (two man post hole digger): $80
    Total: $3100
    Someone suggest it is roughly $100/m2 for the material only, but I know the cost will go up at the end of the day.
    The price of 90x19mm Merbau should be less than $4 lm, at least at big B in Sydney.
    The site just be cleaned last weekend, and this weekend may start sourcing the timber and decking, and prepare the digging. Expect to be finished by the end of the year.
    Following the link below, you will need 4.5 bags 20kg concrete mix for the 300x600 footing.
    http://www.bluecirclesoutherncement....ncretePremixed
    Good luck for you progress, I will keep watches your post.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by chipps; 18th Nov 2009 at 12:50 PM. Reason: Created a new thread for this topic

  2. #2
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    Default

    140 x 45 F4 wont span 2400 mm in a single span, Need 190 x 35 (45 mm better for nailing)

    MGP 140 x 45 mm will do single span so just check with timber supplier

  3. #3
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    Default

    I have double check, It is MGP10 140 x45 H3 TP.

    Is the MGP same as MGP10?

  4. #4
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    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" height="68" width="595"><tbody><tr><td height="50" width="585">
    </td></tr><tr valign="top"><td height="18" width="585">
    </td></tr></tbody></table><table class="text" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="754"><tbody><tr valign="top"><td style="padding-top: 20px;" width="145">
    </td><td width="604">All good
    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="500"> <tbody><tr valign="top"> <td style="padding-left: 15px; padding-top: 15px;" width="500"> Properties of Machine Graded Pine

    Most Radiata Pine sold in Australia for structural use is now machine graded into stress grades. The timber is fed continuously through a machine that measures the timber stiffness by measuring the load required to cause a fixed deflection. The piece of timber is then branded with the appropriate stress grade.

    Machine Graded Pine (MGP) is currently available in three ratings: MGP10, MGP12 and MGP15. Timber branded MGP10 can be substituted for F5, MGP12 for F8 and MGP15 for F11. F graded timber (either visually or mechanically graded) cannot be substituted for MGP material.

    Basic working stresses for MGP pine are shown in Table 1. These are multiplied by the depth effect factors given in Table 2.

    Compression perpendicular to the grain and joint shear strength as derived from AS1720.1 Table 2.2 for SD6 timber are 4.1 and 1.7 MPa respectively.

    Joint strength groups are shown in Table 3.

    Reference: Pine Australia manual: Working with MGP Pine – High Wind Wall Framing Table.

    Pine Australia brochure: Pine Possibilities – An Introduction to Pine.



    Table 1 – Basic Working Stresses for MGP Pine
    <table border="1" cellpadding="7" cellspacing="1" width="697"> <tbody> <tr> <td rowspan="2" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="17%"> Stress Grade
    </td> <td colspan="6" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="83%"> Basic Working Stresses (Mpa)
    </td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="12%"> Bending
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="12%"> Tension
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="11%"> Shear
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="15%"> Compression
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="15%"> Modulas of Elasticity
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="18%"> Modulas of Rigidity MPa
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="17%"> MGP 10
    </td> <td valign="top" width="12%"> 5.5*
    </td> <td valign="top" width="12%"> 3.0
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 1.7
    </td> <td valign="top" width="15%"> 8.0
    </td> <td valign="top" width="15%"> 10,000
    </td> <td valign="top" width="18%"> 670
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="17%"> MGP 12
    </td> <td valign="top" width="12%"> 9.5
    </td> <td valign="top" width="12%"> 5.1
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 2.2
    </td> <td valign="top" width="15%"> 9.8
    </td> <td valign="top" width="15%"> 12,700
    </td> <td valign="top" width="18%"> 850
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="17%"> MGP 15
    </td> <td valign="top" width="12%"> 14.0
    </td> <td valign="top" width="12%"> 7.7
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 3.1
    </td> <td valign="top" width="15%"> 12.0
    </td> <td valign="top" width="15%"> 15,200
    </td> <td valign="top" width="18%"> 1010
    </td></tr></tbody></table>

    Table 2 – Depth Effect Factors
    <table border="1" cellpadding="7" cellspacing="1" width="441"> <tbody> <tr> <td rowspan="2" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="33%"> Basic Working Stress
    </td> <td colspan="5" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="67%"> Depth (mm)
    </td></tr> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="22%"> 70 to 140
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="11%"> 170
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="11%"> 190
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="11%"> 240
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="11%"> 290
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="33%"> Bending & Tension
    </td> <td valign="top" width="22%"> 1.00
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.95
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.93
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.86
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.79
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="33%"> Shear & Compression
    </td> <td valign="top" width="22%"> 1.00
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.98
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.96
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.93
    </td> <td valign="top" width="11%"> 0.89
    </td></tr></tbody></table>
    Table 3 – Joint Strength Groups
    <table border="1" cellpadding="7" cellspacing="1" width="433"> <tbody> <tr> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="53%">Stress Grade
    </td> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="top" width="47%">Joint Group
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="53%"> MGP 10
    </td> <td valign="top" width="47%"> JD4
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="53%"> MGP 12
    </td> <td valign="top" width="47%"> JD4
    </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="53%"> MGP 15
    </td> <td valign="top" width="47%"> JD4
    </td></tr></tbody></table> NOTE:
    A joint strength group of JD5 is applicable to MGP10 pine that contains ‘heart-in’ material.
    </td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table>

  5. #5
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    Hi Cherub65,

    Thank you for the rich information.

    Do you know those MGP10 H3 TP needed to apply the wood perservation to the cut after the cutting?

    After one week hard work, all the footing finished, one hole crash the stomer water pipe which is waiting to be fix this week.

    I am going to source them form local big B this weekend. The Merbau 90x19 is $3.95/LM, and the MGP10 H3 TP 140x45 just under sub $7. I have checked several place, they just can not match the big B.

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=rldragon;779443]
    Do you know those MGP10 H3 TP needed to apply the wood perservation to the cut after the cutting?

    No need as H3 shouldn't be in contact with the ground anyway


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