Hire the best Flooring Expert

Best material for new stumps

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vic
    Posts
    17

    Default Best material for new stumps

    Hi Folks,
    I am just embarking on an extension on our 10 year old holiday home in the bush in Central Victoria. This will be a large room with a verandah on two sides, following the existing verandah. The house is on flat sloping ground. A bench for the house, which is big enough for the extension, was cut out of the existing slope when the house was built and has very little soil over soft sandstone containing lots of quartz rocks. The height of the house above the ground is 1000mm, sloping a further 300mm to the corner of the build over a total distance of 7 m.

    My problem is the best material for the stumps. The existing house has hardwood (red gum I think) but there are termites in the area, so I am thinking cypress or TP. I assume the length is too great for concrete, since the corner stump would need to be 1300 plus the in-ground portion. The draftsman specified 700 stump holes, which look excessive in this very hard ground, but there you go... If I go with cypress or TP, would I need to pour a pad to sit them on or could I embed them in concrete? If it is a case of pour a pad then install, could I back-fill with quikset? Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

    Quigs

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vic
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Thanks Moondog, I would be pleased to use concrete, but I am a little worried about the weight of an 1800 100*100 stump. Might be a struggle dropping it into a wet 200 mm base and getting height and levels right. Am I being too cautious?

    Quigs

  4. #4
    4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    6,507

    Default

    Good question I'm not qualified to answer, biggest I've used was 1100mm and the restumping type where you level fist, set the stump and then pour the concrete

  5. #5
    1K Club Member Pulse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Port Macquarie
    Posts
    1,751

    Default

    75mm x75mm x3mm shs duragal steel, weld on a top plate dangle in the hole and pour! Easy, light and strong

    Cheers
    Pulse

  6. #6
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wendouree
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quigs View Post
    Thanks Moondog, I would be pleased to use concrete, but I am a little worried about the weight of an 1800 100*100 stump. Might be a struggle dropping it into a wet 200 mm base and getting height and levels right. Am I being too cautious?

    Quigs
    When you buy your concrete stumps, they have a little loop of steel on the top.
    Put a nail in your joists and hang the stump from it. When you poor in your concrete, just push it into position as it will hang cockeyed until you pour in your concrete.
    Hardest part is dragging the damn things under the house.

  7. #7
    7K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    8,305

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wazzabp View Post
    ...When you buy your concrete stumps, they have a little loop of steel on the top.
    ...
    I think quigs is talking stumps for his new build, not restumping the old, although that would be inevitable at some stage.

    Anyway, the steel loop version is for hanging concrete stumps during a restump, and for a new build I'd buy the stumps with a spike which goes through the bearer and is bent over tight to tie the bearer down.

    Quigs, I agree that a 2m concrete stump will be heavy and cumbersome. Regardless of the way you go I would always pour pads first and let them cure.

    If concrete stumps, and because your pad is very unlikey to be the perfect depth for every stump at every bearer position, pour the pad a little low (or buy the stumps a little short after you have measured each from the pad to your bearer string line), then when setting your stumps dump some wet concrete in, maybe 1/2 a barrow, lower the stump (don't drop it) and settle it into the mix to your string line, also ensuring it's plumb, and brace the high ones (or backfill straight away to ensure they stay plum). The aggregate should give enough resistence so you can gradually riggle the stump down to the string line. It does take some practice, and I'd start with the shorter, lighter ones. Don't use quick-set for this method of setting. You should always be looking to buy concrete stumps less than 100mm too short, so you have less than 100mm of 'new' concrete from your pad to the bottom of the stump. Any decent supplier will sell them in 100mm increments.

    If you go TP, you could simply set them a little high and then cut them off once they are solid. But personally I wouldn't go to all this trouble using TP, especially if you plan to own it for the long haul.

Similar Threads

  1. Steel stumps versus Concrete stumps
    By Doreen in forum Sub Flooring
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 9th Feb 2011, 02:18 PM
  2. roofing material
    By sinjin in forum Roofing
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 4th Feb 2011, 03:02 PM
  3. Can someone identify this material?
    By davo79 in forum Asbestos
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 7th Jun 2010, 10:15 PM
  4. Merbau. Is it the right material?
    By hmhdyman in forum Decking
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11th Jan 2008, 02:44 PM
  5. Ceiling material?
    By Santalum in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14th Sep 2005, 01:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •