Hire the best Flooring Expert

Resin Injection Wall Levelling

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    31

    Default Resin Injection Wall Levelling

    One corner of my house has dropped about 40-50mm below the rest, its resulted in a noticeable slope in two rooms and a loose corner in a third.
    It appears to be fairly stable, with no new cracking or visible movement in the three or so years I have owned this place.
    The walls are double brick, I think they would have been built in the late 1800's, the floor is just timber.

    I have been told that resin injection is a good way to raise the walls back to level, and I'm keen to hear other peoples experiences or thoughts on this.
    A family friend had this done reciently and the initial result seems good, however I would be interested to see if they have any long term issues.

    Any thoughts or experences on this?

    Any other options I may should consider?

  2. #2
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Qld
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    A building surveyor would advise underpinning, an engineer would advise high pressure slurry pumping, problem is, both systems are very expensive and both can cause leaks.

    Resin on the other hand is quite stable (if mixed properly) and waterproof.

    I saw a multi storey buildings foundations tilt soon after they were poured, a team form Melbourne came to Central Qld and pumped several hundreds cubic metres of what looked like grout under 3 sides. The building then completed and still stands tall today.


    I also saw an added room on the low side of a house start to lean away from the house and pull the inner wall with it.

    It was underpinned by placing jacks along the lower wall, then more jacks with longer support beams, then excavated, re jacked to level, pre-cast concrete beams then placed then concrete to fill the gaps. It's still level today.

    I van see no reason why rein would not work assuming it's fibre reinforced.

    Good luck.
    Growing old is compulsory, growing up is not.
    http://www.wet-seal.com.au/waterproofing/locations.html

  3. #3
    Old Chippy 6K
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canberra
    Age
    70
    Posts
    6,582

    Default

    First thing you need to consider is what is the cause. You seemed to have jumped to a solution without really knowing the problem - you've described symptoms, but that's a result not a cause. So for example - have the double brick walls in that corner dropped and the internal timber floors remains level or has the whole corner dropped? Or has the whole house subsided evenly in that direction (one indication of this would be small or no cracks) suggesting that there might be variation in soil types across the block, maybe a spring or other factor.

    This is not a problem to get diagnosed on a forum IMO - however good the advice can be here. It needs professional onsite inspection and a report identifying the cause(s) and advice on options to fix with estimates of cost and effectiveness for each option. Depending what the cause is there are likely to be a range of alternatives available.

    One option, which is what I'd do, since you say it has been stable for a number of years, is to simply leave it alone. Unless it is an active structural failure then their really is no need to do anything - unless the assault on your aesthetic sense overtakes your common sense so much you want to throw money at the 'problem'.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  4. #4
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bloss View Post
    First thing you need to consider is what is the cause. You seemed to have jumped to a solution without really knowing the problem - you've described symptoms, but that's a result not a cause.
    You make a good point here. I probebly should consider that in more depth.

    So for example - have the double brick walls in that corner dropped and the internal timber floors remains level or has the whole corner dropped?
    The whole corner has dropped.

    One option, which is what I'd do, since you say it has been stable for a number of years, is to simply leave it alone. Unless it is an active structural failure then their really is no need to do anything - unless the assault on your aesthetic sense overtakes your common sense so much you want to throw money at the 'problem'.
    If I could be reasonable sure that there would be no further movment I would be happy to leave it as is, and just level the floor. (The floor needs replacing no matter what).
    What I dont want to do is make the floor level, fix everything up and then find that in a year or two its moved again.

    I think I might just hand over the $$$ and get an engineer to check it out in more detail then decide what to do.

  5. #5
    Old Chippy 6K
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canberra
    Age
    70
    Posts
    6,582

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill108 View Post
    You make a good point here.

    I think I might just hand over the $$$ and get an engineer to check it out in more detail then decide what to do.
    Yep - that's the right way to go. Although if you intend replacing the floor you could remove a section of it near that corner so you can see and take pics of what it is like from underneath. But in the end I reckon you need professional advice - having access to that corner will make that more informed too though.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Agree with Bloss.

    The concern l have is the fact that a house that has stood for so long has now decided to drop in one area. Do you know your soil type and is it dispersive? Has anything changed outside that you can think of; a recent excavation project maybe? Realising the cause generally assists in effecting the correct fix. The council should know the soil type.

  7. #7
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Agree with Bloss.

    The concern l have is the fact that a house that has stood for so long has now decided to drop in one area.
    I'm not sure when it dropped. Ive owned the place for a bit over 3 years now and there has been no movement in that time. I dont know when it dropped (could have been years ago) ow how long it took to drop.
    Do you know your soil type and is it dispersive? Has anything changed outside that you can think of; a recent excavation project maybe? Realising the cause generally assists in effecting the correct fix. The council should know the soil type.
    No evidence of any excavations in the recient past. Not sure of the soil type but I would think thats something an engineer would determine when they look at the issue.

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Good to hear that it isn't a more recent and sudden drop. A structural engineer will give a professional independent assessment whereas the trade professionals will be biased towards promoting their own methods. Resin injection use to be expensive but l haven't heard any reports for a few years now. Has your family friend commented on this and is that person also a Bathurst local?

    Have you used the forum's search facility? Some threads can be difficult to find, it all depends on how the thread was titled. Check terms like "foundation subsidence", "cracks in walls", "uretek" and the like but getting a structural engineer in is the go.

    BTW, your thread title is very good.

  9. #9
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Has your family friend commented on this and is that person also a Bathurst local?
    Yes they are in Bathurst. I cant remember the exact cost but it was a between 6k and 7k.
    Have you used the forum's search facility? Some threads can be difficult to find, it all depends on how the thread was titled. Check terms like "foundation subsidence", "cracks in walls", "uretek" and the like but getting a structural engineer in is the go.
    Thanks, I had done a search and found a few things but they did not seem to completely answer my questions, in particular concering any long term issues.
    BTW, your thread title is very good.
    Thanks
    Vague or misleading titles irk me so I try and make them clear and obvious.

  10. #10
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    1

    Default http://www.resinject.com.au/


  11. #11
    Old Chippy 6K
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Canberra
    Age
    70
    Posts
    6,582

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyc View Post
    Gotta watch the dates of the posts - reckon he might have done something since February . . .
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

Similar Threads

  1. Resin storage shed
    By chriswarr in forum The Garden Shed
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14th Jan 2012, 01:01 PM
  2. polyurethane injection - uretek
    By btio in forum Brickwork
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 24th Mar 2010, 06:24 PM
  3. Lath injection adhesive
    By TritonJapan in forum Plastering
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 7th May 2009, 08:15 AM
  4. Plumbers ABS Resin - where can I get it
    By MikeT in forum Plumbing
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 14th Oct 2008, 01:02 AM
  5. Resin Injections vs Underpinning
    By RenoGirl in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30th Jul 2006, 10:30 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •