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What's under antcaps on piers?

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  1. #1
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    Default What's under antcaps on piers?

    The more one looks,the more one finds.

    On top of most - but not all, there's the rub - piers, engaged or otherwise, in my 70's brick-veneer-on-sandstone-with-timber-floors house in Northern suburbs of Sydney, are pieces of what look like asphalt-impregnated material, maybe 0.5mm thick. This material is under the antcaps, and about the same size as the brick surface of the pier.

    So what's it for? Additonal ant-proofing? To protect the antcap? Anybody come across this usage before?

    Very curious.

  2. #2
    The Master's Apprentice Bedford's Avatar
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    I reckon it would be Melthoid and they've used that as packing to level things.
    Posted by John2b, And no, BEVs are not going to save the planet, which doesn't need saving anyway.

  3. #3
    2K Club Member barney118's Avatar
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    You should have a dpc damp proof course,sounds like it could be bitumen impregnated aluminum?which is a form of dpc
    cheers Look out if I have a tape measure in my hand.....I'm upto something

  4. #4
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Could be either of the above: 'malthoid' or bituminised aluminium or zinc damp course. The purpose is to stop corrosion of the gal cap from moisture in the piers - the same way their is a damp proof course in the external brickwork, only in a pier simply popped on top.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

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    Thanks gents, malthoid makes sense. I do remember it from years ago

    Is this still current practice, or are galvanised ant caps regarded as sufficient nowadays?

  6. #6
    Old Chippy 6K
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    I use poly barrier - gal ant caps have been in use >100 years
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  7. #7
    RWB
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    Quote Originally Posted by Compleat Amateu View Post
    The more one looks,the more one finds.

    On top of most - but not all, there's the rub - piers, engaged or otherwise, in my 70's brick-veneer-on-sandstone-with-timber-floors house in Northern suburbs of Sydney, are pieces of what look like asphalt-impregnated material, maybe 0.5mm thick. This material is under the antcaps, and about the same size as the brick surface of the pier.


    So what's it for? Additonal ant-proofing? To protect the antcap? Anybody come across this usage before?

    Very curious.
    Malthoid going by the age of the house. It is to stop corrosion of the antcap from moister in the piers.
    It is now mandatory (BCA) to put DPC under ALL metalic materials in contact with concrete or bricks, because of moister and / or electrolytic reaction with salts or chemicals in the concrete / bricks.

    Regards
    Ray

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