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Proper slope for a ramp

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  1. #1
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    Default Proper slope for a ramp

    I have just finished a new deck which runs around three sides of our house. The side near the front door has six steps, but where the deck finishes on the other side is only 500mm from the ground and I was thinking ofputting in a ramp, rather than steps.

    My question is how long/steep can the ramp be? I am thinking of future furniture moving etc. Is 1:4 unreasonable. or 1:6? I am aware that proper diasbility ramps are 1:12 to 1:1 Any advice or opinions welcome.

  2. #2
    Old Chippy 6K
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    1:4 is still a step! 1:8 is about as steep as you want to go for walkability, but the access code is usually at 1:14 for those with disabilities. If you did 1:6 it would be non-compliant, but still usable for able bodied users - you might want to add some anti-slip surface of some type.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  3. #3
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    just going off memory here, but I'm pretty sure you can have a driveway at 1:4 max with correct transitions, so I couldn't see why you couldn't have a similar ramp at that slope anywhere else on the property, disabled access rules don't apply to private residences.
    regards inter

  4. #4
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    I think I must solve this empirically. I will lay some long lengths of timber against the deck and see what looks reasonable. My principal motive is ease of furniture moving, but we are not getting any younger and might appreciate the romp one day... Thanks for the comments.
    Quigs

  5. #5
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    Also make it a decent width 1200 or so

  6. #6
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Inter's right on disabled access rules - but depends a bit how long you'll be there. Sometimes its useful to have a ramp that complies as there can be older 'downsizers' who like the access already in place. In your case ("not getting any younger") it might be smart to build it at a shallower angle from the start even if you have no immediate need. But you might think your immediate use is more important - I reckon 1:4 is a bit steep, but for just the sake of easier furniture moving etc might be OK - I would never build that steep for a residence, maybe for a shed or similar. Your idea of grabbing a length of timber and just seeing how it looks often helps - most people I know like to see a mock up rather than trying to imagine what it might look like. The cost and effort to build isn't all that much different really so better to build for the widest use. Or leave it and use planks for the furniture moving . . .
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by quigs View Post
    I think I must solve this empirically. I will lay some long lengths of timber against the deck and see what looks reasonable. My principal motive is ease of furniture moving, but we are not getting any younger and might appreciate the romp one day... Thanks for the comments.
    Quigs
    I have found that, as long as you keep taking the tablets, you can appreciate a romp at any age.

  8. #8
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  9. #9
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    Of course, young people sometimes quite unexpectedly find themselves using a ramp as well. I put my back out badly once and was facing a wheelchair - I was only in my 30s at the time. Always handy to have a ramp access about the place.

  10. #10
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    Ramps are great, they just require lots of space.
    You do not need to be old to need one. Walking frames, trolleys, wheel chairs, prams are all easier to move with a ramp compared to steps.
    For 500mm height you will require 7 metres for a ramp with a gradient of 1:14.

  11. #11
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    If you look at My Ramp Project- that ramp is 1:8 or there abouts - 7 degrees - It is very comfortable to walk up and down - if someone in a wheel-chair moves into our house then they can change it but they would have trouble getting up the internal stairs
    David L
    "A dedicated amateur will always do a better job than a slap dash professional"

  12. #12
    Retired Marine Engineer 1K Club Member Ashore's Avatar
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    pb090057.jpgpc010091.jpg
    Just put one in on our new rear deck. Council regs 1:8 with non slip coating is the minimun . 1: 14 is the angle for disabilities.
    Whtch the corner you need to cut them to get a wheelchair/pram around them
    Ashore




    The trouble with life is there's no background music.

  13. #13
    Building Designer ausdesign's Avatar
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    1:8 for 'normal' & 1:14 for 'disabled' is correct for regulation requirements.
    Peter Clarkson

    www.ausdesign.com.au

    This information is intended to provide general information only.
    It does not purport to be a comprehensive advice.

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