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Induction Cooktop

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  1. #1
    2K Club Member seriph1's Avatar
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    Default Induction Cooktop

    hi all

    just wondering if anyone has one of these, or has seen a demonstration on them...... they are supposed to be good, but with so many new things coming onto the market all the time I am wondering if it is just another fad I can very much do without.

    have fun
    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here

  2. #2
    Alien in a Strange Land Honorary Bloke's Avatar
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    Induction cooktops have been around now for a few years. Their major attraction is that they are not hot to the touch, thus preventing burns to kids (and adults). They work very well, but keep in mind that you will need to use only certain kinds of cookware, because the induction thingie won't work with everything. For example, glass is out. I don't remember all the others. But given the correct cookware, it cooks very well.

    [Edit: But I personally believe gas coooking is tops.]
    Cheers,

    Bob

    "The population of Sydney was divided into two classes, those who sold rum and those who drank it."
    --Dr George Macakness (1806)

  3. #3
    Pretend my avatar moves! bitingmidge's Avatar
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    Yep, they've been around a long time. I've had a few serious looks at them over the years and most people I have asked who have them love them.

    They are EXPENSIVE and when it comes down to it the cool to touch thing is the only redeeming feature. That is better than it sounds, because spills won't get baked on, and the Gaggenau version (which costs about as much as a small country) doesn't have any buttons or knobs, just a little magnet thingy that you have to know where to swipe to adjust stuff.

    We currently have a Smeg glass top, with touch controls, so no buttons either, and it heats to maximum temperature in nine seconds (9) so is almost as instantaneous as gas.

    You need "special" cookware for induction tops, not all alloys will give the best performance, and you can't just bung a glass casserole post on top to give it a quick warm.

    Having said that, it's best to have "special" cookware for glass tops too, built with flat, solid bottoms designed to conduct the heat through the pot, but the alloys aren't as important (some do mark the ceramic tops though).

    Don't try to use a regular tin wok, it won't work! But with the cast ones designed for the purpose you wouldn't know you weren't cooking on an open flame.

    Cheers,

    P

  4. #4
    Microsurgeons are great! renomart's Avatar
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    You can read about my magnetic induction cooktop on my kitchen design blog.

    My unit is an Electrolux 'Gallery' model. I had gas previously but this unit beats the pants off gas in terms of efficiency and speed. I would never go back to gas.

    Get a demonstration in-store if you can. (try Kleenmaid, they are purposely setup for magnetic induction demonstrations). You will be amazed!

  5. #5
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    We've had a baumatic one for a year and a bit ($2k). they are not that expensive when comparing like with like - a decent all glass top electric is over a thousand dollars anyway, and if you dont have gas connected, then its cheaper than gas. If you do have gas already up and running, I am not sure i can see the advantage.

    Speed of heat up is extremely fast, and faster than gas, with all the clean up beefits of glass tops. the cookware can now be got quite cheap - all it needs is for a magnet to stcik to the bottom and it will work. BigW sellcooking sets for <$100. plenty of cheapo woks are iron - but you need the flat bottom, and also to seal (i dont do woks so....). Bigegst drama for utensils is non stick fry pans, which you have to go to the upper ranges which are $70 or so - the Kmart chuck away aluminium tefals dont work.

    No reason to go the way of the dinosaur, as high rise doesnt get gas anymore, so induction is the only way to satisfy a cook who used gas previously (also almost old hat in europe!). As an aside - a few of the cooking shows use induction tops these days.

  6. #6
    TWC
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    Hi All,

    I certainly agree with Pharmaboy2 and Renomart that induction cooktops are the way of the future.

    I have tried the Kleenmaid trial cooktop and compared it to both electric and gas and the induction was certainly much quicker. Suprising for gas I would hear some of you say, even SWMBO (who has always preferred gas cooktops) especially for asian style cooking, was amazed after our comparison, so we are now certainly convinced that induction will be our next cooktop.

    The only negative I can think of against them is price, but given all the benefits I certainly will not let that deter me. In fact like Pharmaboy2 says, the cost of getting gas connected to the house on my battleaxe block definitely further swings the arguement in favour of induction.

    Any magnetic cooking appliance can be used on induction. You can even cook with a towel under the saucepan to avoid the spills which makes clean up of the cooktop a breeze.

    Can't wait until I get the time to do our next kitchen renovation so that we can replace the current electric cooktop with induction.

    Cheers
    TWC

  7. #7
    Apprentice (new member) Wardy's Avatar
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    i agree with the comments, induction is the way to go. we decided on kleenmaid with the 5 year guarantee and have been exceptionally happy.the speed and reduction in cooking time outways the price.easy to clean and they look very neat and tidy when installed.they have been around for years but the price put a lot of people off from buying them but i think more people are going that way now for their cooktop. well worth paying the extra $'s
    cheers

  8. #8
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    Our house power supply was maxed out so could not connect an induction unit. From memory they need up to a 30A circuit?
    The cost of upgrading the power line to house, external fuse, wire to meter and fuse box was way more than connect to existing gas.

    Pity as we purchased new pots and pans in case we got the induction unit.

  9. #9
    Hitter of thumbs, Arrrgh! savage's Avatar
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    Have to agree with all of the comments above, induction is very cool to touch but you must remember that any residual heat in the pot does transfere to the cooking suface and it does get HOT! The cool to touch is if you have the cookware that stands on small legs like small ball feet and the bottom of the pot does not actually touch the top, as it cooks by a magnetic field when the pot is in this field it is active and cooks. Where as if the pot does touch the top it gets hot!...The one good thing is that if a child does reach up and turns it on and they place there hand on the plate it will not hurt them, and the one we have times out and turns off if a magnetically conductive metal is not detected in 10-15 seconds.

    I have the KLEENMAID with touch controls andsubsiquently a totally flat, sealed ceramic surface, easy clean, but very expensive for repairs. We had one of the magnetic cooking elements replaced not long after insallation and there was no problem with the service, but the chap told me it was worth several hundred dollars and I was lucky it was under warrenty.
    savage(Eric)

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  10. #10
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    A couple of other things to keep in mind:
    There are some less expensive units on the market. Before buying these check how much power can be used (as a percentage) on each burner when three or more are turned on. Some cheaper units only use one induction engine to power four burners, not good.

    Most people will have at least a few good pots which can't be used on induction. Even if the pot will allow a magnet to stick it may not be very efficient for induction. One idea I like is the combination units where the front two burners are induction and the rear standard electric (usually ribbon element). Whichever way you go, you WILL be impressed with induction cooking.

    Cheers,

    Mark
    silkwood

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