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Kitchen exhaust options

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  1. #1
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    Default Kitchen exhaust options

    Hi all,

    I'm redoing a kitchen and am wondering about air extraction. The old kitchen had one of those retro looking Westinghouse rangehoods with carbon filters, and I'm not as fan of those filtering rangehoods in general. Also, there is really not a lot of room to be sacrificing wall cabinet space to an exhaust rangehood as it is a fairly small space.

    The cooker will be electric. There will be a gap of 620mm from the cooktop to the bottom of the wall cabinets above it. There is also a decent sized window next to the cooking area which can help keep the air fresh when cooking.

    So first question I have is - is powered extraction an actual requirement for a residential kitchen? honestly I have only occasionally ever turned them on based on how and what I cook, so I'm not sure how useful they really are for me. I also tend to clean the area fairly thoroughly after cooking so am not worried about grease particles not being extracted, and the bottom of the cabinets will have a layer of material which should be fairly resistant to steam damage.

    And secondly, would a fan in the ceiling be a decent compromise? I would want it ducted out through the roof of course and not just blowing into the cavity, I'm just struggling to find solutions like this suited for a kitchen. The ceilings are not especially high and an extracting fan could be placed right above the cooktop area (wall cabinets only come out about halfway from the cooktop from a birds eye perspective), so I imagine it would still be effective in at least extracting moist/steamy air?

  2. #2
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TD80 View Post

    Hi all,

    I'm redoing a kitchen and am wondering about air extraction. The old kitchen had one of those retro looking Westinghouse rangehoods with carbon filters, and I'm not as fan of those filtering rangehoods in general. Also, there is really not a lot of room to be sacrificing wall cabinet space to an exhaust rangehood as it is a fairly small space.

    The cooker will be electric. There will be a gap of 620mm from the cooktop to the bottom of the wall cabinets above it. There is also a decent sized window next to the cooking area which can help keep the air fresh when cooking.


    So first question I have is - is powered extraction an actual requirement for a residential kitchen? honestly I have only occasionally ever turned them on based on how and what I cook, so I'm not sure how useful they really are for me. I also tend to clean the area fairly thoroughly after cooking so am not worried about grease particles not being extracted, and the bottom of the cabinets will have a layer of material which should be fairly resistant to steam damage.
    Yes it is, you would be crazy to not put some sort of extraction device in.

    Quote Originally Posted by TD80 View Post
    And secondly, would a fan in the ceiling be a decent compromise? I would want it ducted out through the roof of course and not just blowing into the cavity, I'm just struggling to find solutions like this suited for a kitchen. The ceilings are not especially high and an extracting fan could be placed right above the cooktop area (wall cabinets only come out about halfway from the cooktop from a birds eye perspective), so I imagine it would still be effective in at least extracting moist/steamy air?
    No it wont, firstly it will be useless, older kitchens used to have this setup, everyone I have seen has grease and crap around the fan, because it's not a concentrated source of suction, it's just picking up random air here and there.

    You have three options

    Conventional rangehood, either freestanding or concealed and recirculate the air via carbon filters.

    Conventional rangehood, either freestanding or concealed and duct it through the roof cavity to outside the roof, you cannot legally just duct it onto the roof cavity.

    Proper ceiling mounted flush rangehood, these are expensive

    You will need to check the cooktop specifications, some have different height requirements, one brand of induction we are doing soon, has a 700mm height requirement, others 650mm, have seen some that wanted 750mm.
    Last edited by phild01; 19th May 2022 at 10:03 AM. Reason: quotes
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  3. #3
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    Thanks for your reply Metrix - do you happen to know of a brand/model of freestanding conventional rangehood that is as slim as possible?

    So you're saying something like this would be useless?

    https://www.winnings.com.au/p/sirius...tractor-sbe1wh

    Also, they're super expensive but what about "downdraft" rangehoods? I intend to have a free standing oven and cooktop so I don't think they would really work anyway, but curious about their effectiveness.

  4. #4
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
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    I don't know if the one you linked to would be any good, as I haven't seen them before, looks a bit small IMO 450 m3/hour is pretty weak.

    If you are having cupboards above the cooktop, then go for an undermount type.
    Something like this one has good suction, is completely concealed uses baffle filters instead of the traditional mesh filters so is more efficient, comes in two sizes for 60cm or 90cm cooktops.

    https://www.appliancesonline.com.au/...gehood-ck85ucf

    If you like the one you linked do, then go for this brand, it has more suction, an externally mounted motor so the rangehood is virtually silent, it also has higher suction and longer warranty.
    This kitchen has the undermount version installed, it's the best rangehood I have ever had.

    https://www.appliancesonline.com.au/...l-motor-brw600
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  5. #5
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    We have this one in our kitchen. Its a robinhood one. It claims 1000m3 but it seems to make alot of noise, it does move the palms outside our kitchen window from the vent

    But its 27cm deep and 90cm wide

    https://www.betta.com.au/robinhood-u...gaAhvhEALw_wcB

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TD80 View Post
    So first question I have is - is powered extraction an actual requirement for a residential kitchen? honestly I have only occasionally ever turned them on based on how and what I cook, so I'm not sure how useful they really are for me. I also tend to clean the area fairly thoroughly after cooking so am not worried about grease particles not being extracted, and the bottom of the cabinets will have a layer of material which should be fairly resistant to steam damage.
    Is it mandatory?
    Is it in your DA as a requirement ? If you didn’t need to get a DA for the work then who is going to know?

    Do you really need one?
    In our downstairs kitchen we don’t have a rangehood. We have been living downstairs for a year and using that kitchen full time while finishing off the upstairs with its larger kitchen.

    The truth is that the vertical surfaces seem to take care of themselves but there is a film of grease on some horizontal surfaces - the top of the fridge and the high cupboards. Oddly, lower horizontals like tables don’t seem to get impacted.

    Your choice. If you don’t mind a bit of extra cleaning then I guess it’s not an issue. We should probably be cleaning those surfaces about three times a year - that’s the speed at which it builds up.

    I can’t detect any film on the ceiling but maybe allow for cleaning the ceiling occasionally.

    It depends how you cook too. We never use oil (or any sort of fat) when cooking but rely on new-technology non-stick surfaces. Induction is cleaner too because there isn’t a long heat up or cool down phase.

    We will be putting a rangehood in upstairs, however.

    Also, think of resale value.

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