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Protecting bottom of base cabinets from water

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  1. #1
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    Default Protecting bottom of base cabinets from water

    Hi

    I've got some secondhand cabinets with sides that go to the floor and become the cabinet 'feet'.

    What is the best way to raise them above the floor a bit to avoid the cut edges getting wet and swelling if the dishwasher or washing machine floods?

    I thought about those small plastic nail-in furniture slides (this would help me slide them around too as they are quite tall and heavy). Or rubbing silicone into the cut edges?
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    You could probably paint the edges, or get some melamine edging and glue it on to seal it.
    if the laundry floods you've probably got bigger issues to worry about.

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    We recently added a kitchen bench to a new apartment. The cabinets were chosen from Ikea, and they do not sit on the floor like that, so water on the floor doesn't usually damage the cabinets.



    The front kickpanel is water damagable, but also easily replaceable.

    If you are concerned about water damage for your cabinets, then maybe you could use similar methods to separate the cabinets from the floor.

    Those who want to ignore the science are increasingly alone. They are on their own shrinking island.


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    You mean add plastic legs? I believe the ikea ones have the holes predrilled. I will investigate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joynz View Post
    You mean add plastic legs? I believe the ikea ones have the holes predrilled. I will investigate.
    They have various, plastic, steel and stainless and different heights. Screw to the cabinets is possible.


    CAPITA Leg - IKEA

    Some are adjustable height as well, or can be sawn as we did with the ss version for an entertainment unit.

    Those who want to ignore the science are increasingly alone. They are on their own shrinking island.


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    Only problem is the bottom shelf of cabinet needs to be strong enough to support the weight of cabinet if you use those legs.
    In the picture that cabinet is designed to carry the weight through the sides.

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    Sure. The other thing you can do is to do the wall rail method that Ikea does to support most of the weight.

    The legs I showed above do actually support the sides, but others don't.

    Those who want to ignore the science are increasingly alone. They are on their own shrinking island.


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    You can add steel angle to the cabinet sides easily enough, then any foot added will take the weight on the vertical panel but the idea to add a rail to the wall and suspend most of the cabinet weight on that via the studs is simply brilliiant
    Cecile and I have plenty of spares if you need any brackets BTW but you can buy the rails on their own from IKEA, we may even have an off-cut wide enough if i look hard
    I know from expensive painful experience that just those cheap plastic feet do not work
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

    Legal disclaimer denying responsibility to be inserted here.

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    Many ways to do that. From all the possible solutions hanging cabinets from the wall would be probably the worst of them all.
    When I bought a new vanity for my ensuite and all I did was making a moulding with the router table that has a cut in to take the sides of the cabinet. Solid Tasmanian oak, never a problem. Not that my bathroom ever flooded ... nor the laundry or the kitchen.
    Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance
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    Quote Originally Posted by joynz View Post
    Hi

    I've got some secondhand cabinets with sides that go to the floor and become the cabinet 'feet'.

    What is the best way to raise them above the floor a bit to avoid the cut edges getting wet and swelling if the dishwasher or washing machine floods?

    I thought about those small plastic nail-in furniture slides (this would help me slide them around too as they are quite tall and heavy). Or rubbing silicone into the cut edges?

    cut 19mm off the legs and nail 19mm sq timber in its place
    kind regards
    tom armstrong
    www.kitcheninabox.com.au
    Flat Packed kitchens to the world

  11. #11
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
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    I think if either machine floods, the cupboard bottoms will be the least of your worries.
    Mieux vaut prévenir que guérir

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    in ops defense, a concrete slab house with tiles may just drain water to the drain in the even of a flooded machine.
    and in that case the only problem is cabinetry or anything whixh sits on the floor in the vicinity.

    I too think that wall hanging floor vanities or base cabinets is stupid. haha sorry to be so blunt.

    when we do a wet area install (laundry or kitchen with tiled floor butting up to cabinet) with kaboodle or ikea stuff (chipboard or mdf with vinyl covers) we cover the vinyl joins with a quick coat of zinssers white waterproof paint.
    https://www.rustoleum.com/product-ca...roofing-paint/
    we just have a litre of it in the van ready to go after cabinrts are assembled. the theory is the cabinet sits on its vinyl layer, but the join is just above the ground and needs to be sealed. so we just run a roller around the base about 5mm wide and let that dry before sticking it in place.
    we also put that stuff all around any cut hole for pipes and along the cuts around any item going in a benchtop.
    it may be usefull for u but not on the actual bottom face of the side panels, as the weight would just scratch it off.
    only usefull if the bottom face covered in something from factory.
    Else, it just has to sit proud of the findshed floor.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebuildr86 View Post
    I too think that wall hanging floor vanities or base cabinets is stupid. haha sorry to be so blunt.

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    Dishwasher in a rental place flooded and the tenant didn't mention it to the agent - only realised when the tenancy ended and saw the bottoms of the cabinets were all swelled.

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    You fellers will have to explain tat because the IKEA hanging system is simply brilliant, simple and strong and EASY
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

    Legal disclaimer denying responsibility to be inserted here.

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    The simple and often used system is to waterproof around the existing base and tile over the baseboard.

    Good luck and fair winds.
    Growing old is compulsory, growing up is not.
    http://www.wet-seal.com.au/waterproofing/locations.html

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldsaltoz View Post
    The simple and often used system is to waterproof around the existing base and tile over the baseboard.

    Good luck and fair winds.
    Maybe, not something I would like the look of. Wall hung is the way if it can be done properly.

  18. #18
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    wall hung for a bathroom is perfect. no nooks and crannies to struggle to get the mop into to wash the floor. no where for the dust to collect. wish i had done it at my house.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowMick View Post
    wall hung for a bathroom is perfect. no nooks and crannies to struggle to get the mop into to wash the floor. nowhere for the dust to collect. wish i had done it at my house.
    Hi Mick, There would be no need to reach under the unit if the baseboard is waterproofed and tiled, also matches the wall with a single tile along the bottom to cover the waterproofing.
    Good luck and fair winds.



    Growing old is compulsory, growing up is not.
    http://www.wet-seal.com.au/waterproofing/locations.html

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldsaltoz View Post
    Hi Mick, There would be no need to reach under the unit if the baseboard is waterproofed and tiled, also matches the wall with a single tile along the bottom to cover the waterproofing.
    Good luck and fair winds.
    Mopping in the bathroom collects dust and stuff at the inside corners. If the cupboard is wall hung, no corners, no stuff collected.

    If the cupboard is connected to the floor with waterproof baseboard and tiled, when the taps and drain leaks in the future then the area is damaged before likely known. We also didn't have a wall hung basin but if we ever renovate that would be our plan.

    Those who want to ignore the science are increasingly alone. They are on their own shrinking island.


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldsaltoz View Post
    Hi Mick, There would be no need to reach under the unit if the baseboard is waterproofed and tiled, also matches the wall with a single tile along the bottom to cover the waterproofing.
    Good luck and fair winds.

    our vanity has a about a 5 inch gap on either side of it. bath - vanity and shower - vanity. being a fluffy man with a wife with long hair there is always fluff in these gaps. the squeeze mop is not my friend.

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    Expanda Foam?

  23. #23
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    no no, we are saying wall hung is stupid for something that is meant to look like its on the floor nto to mention supposed to sit on the floor. not talking about wall hung vanities at all.
    that is a different kettle of fish.
    The ikea hanging rack thing is far too complicated for what it does. I just screw it to the wall with ram plugs or if the boss inst around to inspect my work, nail plugs. Maybe for stick and plasterboard houses its required.
    Sure its great for wall cabinets, but not floor cabinets.
    The floor is the strongest substrate right, gravity works WITH it, not against it. brilliant and simple.
    IN the bathroom, most guys just slap broken bits of fibrecement sheet under the vanity before mounting it to the wall. simply to keep it above the floor line in case of a flood. this is a safe idea so long as those bits are glued in place so they dont fall out from vibration.
    But back to the issue in the kitchen.
    I hadnt seen the pic till now, doesnt show up on my phone. That tall cabinet would be best having plastic legs (adjustable from bunnings) and then screwed to the wall to stop it toppling.
    That design is quite poor, it relies on your ground being perfectly level, which is never the case.

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