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Repairing Tear in Vinyl

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  1. #1
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    Jun 2010
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    Default Repairing Tear in Vinyl

    Evening all,

    I have a vinyl floor with a couple of tears in it.
    The worst one is pictured in the attached photo.



    What is the best way to repair these tears?
    Contact glue behind the torn bits?

    Or is there another method that would be best to use?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails photo.jpg  

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2011
    Location
    SE Melbourne
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    435

    Default

    Ouch.

    How you repair this will depend on circumstances, traffic and what you have available.

    A professional repairer would cut a section out and weld in a patch. This type of repair may be visable but requires a piece of matching vinyl. The finished job will then be able to handle normal wear.

    You idea of using contact adhesive will probably work, more so on bigger tears like that shown, but may not work on smaller tears.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Batpig's Avatar
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    Sep 2007
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    Northern Brisbania...
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    Default

    Dear Bill,

    The generic name for the correct adhesive to use for the job is called "Seam Sealer". It's the type of glue that the Pro's use when they're installing vinyl and they have to do a join somewhere because the roll isn't wide enough to cover the whole room. It's a bit "solvent" in nature, in so far as it melts the vinyl together somewhat - a bit like a chemical weld, if you will...

    Anyway, here's an example of one particular brand of Seam Sealer:
    Seam Sealer A Cold Weld Vinyl Liquid | Products
    You should be able to find some more available for sale here in Australia somewhere. Bunnings used to sell the stuff, but I'm not so sure anymore. Give them a ring down there and ask to talk to their flooring section; that's where it lives.
    They usually come with a special little metal fin-type nozzle that works its way down in-between the edges of the two pieces of vinyl being joined, so that it can create a full depth joint.

    Now having said all this, the best visual result is usually obtained by performing these joins along the lines that might be present in the vinyl's pattern (rather than just around the existing edge of a ragged tear like yours...) In other words, your best bet will be to do a join along the edge of those imitation floorboard-lines.

    Now, in case you're scratching your head thinking - "Hang on! That's not where the tear is!...", the essential question at this point is - Do you have any offcuts of the stuff lying around in a cupboard somewhere, perhaps leftover from installation?

    If yes, then what you have to do is try to find a piece of offcut that has the same repeated pattern as the section of the floor that the damage is located in. Then - to make a long story relatively short - you have to:
    1) Place the offcut on top of the damaged section of the vinyl,
    2) Line up the offcut's pattern perfectly around its edges with the lines of the damaged vinyl underneath,
    3) Clamp the offcut down as best you can with something heavy, so that it doesn't move,
    4) Cut down through both the offcut and the original vinyl underneath with a Stanley Knife or similar, along the straight lines of the pattern. Use a metal straight edge to help you if you can. You'll obviously have to cut across between floorboards at some point; with a bit of luck there will be a few fake "end" joints in the fake floorboards nearby that will enable you to do this.
    5) If you have successfully managed to prevent the offcut from moving during all of this cutting, you should end up with a patch from the offcut, and a hole in the original vinyl underneath. that are perfectly matched in both their size and pattern.
    6) Once you get to this stage, you're now ready to use the abovementioned Seam Sealer.

    If all of this sounds like a bit too much for you, or you don't have any offcuts of the original vinyl lying around, have a look at this particular video on Youtube:
    Vinyl Flooring Maintenance & Cleaning : How Do I Repair Tears in a Vinyl Floor? - YouTube
    It might not be a bad method to use, with less scope than the one I stated for getting yourself into trouble. The only thing is, though - you'll also need some Vinyl Adhesive, in addition to the Seam Sealer. They'll definitely have some at the BigB, for sure.

    I take it that the damage in question happened last Sunday?... Perhaps caused by a disgruntled "Red" fan?...
    Ahhh.... Victory is So Much Sweeter when you've had to wait a while to get it...
    Ahhhh... Go the mighty Blue Oval and FrostyBum!

    Best Wishes,
    Batpig.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2010
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    Default

    Thanks for the very detailed reply, and the links

    I do have the best part of a square metre of vinyl left over so cutting and replacing is an option.

    I think I will try the procedure shown in that video and see how that works out. If that result is not so great I can always try then try cutting and replacing after that.

    Thanks again for the info!

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