Hire the best Flooring Expert

Temporary living on raw floorboards...

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    178

    Default Temporary living on raw floorboards...

    We have moved back home after our new 130x19mm Sydney Bluegum floorboards have been laid. The floors are being polished in early January and I am a little paranoid about staining the wood before it gets polished.

    Already the cat has crapped on the floor...a bit of wet mortar has fallen and the wife has some 'frying oil splatter' that has made a few drop stains in the kitchen.

    Just wondering whether these will sand out and what sort of things I should try and avoid at all costs getting on the floor.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member rick_rine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    tasmania
    Age
    58
    Posts
    90

    Default

    I had the same problem and ended up getting some free old carpet and putting that down until the time came to finish the floor .

    Regards
    Rick
    uhm , where am I ?

  3. #3
    Hwd Flooring Manufacturer glock40sw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Grafton, N.S.W.
    Age
    62
    Posts
    786

    Default

    G'day.
    Cardboard, hessian, carpet, carpet underlay, Drop sheets.

    Anything you can lay your hands on.

    Cooking oil will be bloody hard to remove.
    As soon as it hits the floor, use some paper towel with a hot cloths iron.
    Place the paper over the oil spot and place the iron on top of the paper. This will draw the oil out of the wood and into the paper. You might want to do it a few times. Don't get the wood too hot.

    It may be a good idea to take the "Dear Old Soul" out to dinner more often rather than her spraying cooking oil everywhere ...

    Hooroo.
    Regards, Trevor.
    Grafton.
    P.S. Not Lismore. Future home of a brand new Lismoron...G'day Bruce

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glock40sw
    G'day.
    Cooking oil will be bloody hard to remove.
    As soon as it hits the floor, use some paper towel with a hot cloths iron.
    Place the paper over the oil spot and place the iron on top of the paper.
    Unfortunately it had been on the loor for about half an hour before it was noticed. Quite a few spatters. I'm bloody worried it won't come out now...

  5. #5
    Hwd Flooring Manufacturer glock40sw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Grafton, N.S.W.
    Age
    62
    Posts
    786

    Default

    It's never too late to try.....

  6. #6
    The typo kign Gumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Melbourne - Outer East Foothills
    Posts
    628

    Default

    Bunnings have really cheap plastic drop sheets. I'd be buying a few of those and taping them down straight away.
    If at first you don't succeed, give something else a go. Life is far too short to waste time trying.

  7. #7
    Hwd Flooring Manufacturer glock40sw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Grafton, N.S.W.
    Age
    62
    Posts
    786

    Default

    Umm.... Don't use plastic.
    It will cause the timber to sweat and thus cause severe cupping and shrinkage problems. It needs to be covered by a breathable material.
    Calico drop sheets. Never plastic.

    Sorry. I should have been clearer in the previous post.

    Hooroo.
    Regards, Trevor.
    Grafton

  8. #8
    The True Believer maglite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Bunbury W.A.
    Age
    54
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glock40sw
    Umm.... Don't use plastic.
    It will cause the timber to sweat and thus cause severe cupping and shrinkage problems. It needs to be covered by a breathable material.
    Hooroo.
    Regards, Trevor.
    Grafton
    How about plastic with holes in it?
    Seriously, we had heavy black builders plastic laid on our boards(jarrah) for the best part of 9 months and we suffered no ill effects.
    Perhaps we were lucky

    Just my 2c worth
    Steve
    if you always do as you have always done, you will always get what you have always got

  9. #9
    Dances with splinters Skew ChiDAMN!!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Paper bag on side o' road
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,142

    Default

    You haven't said what sort of finish you were planning.

    If it's going to be a Tung, Danish or similar oil, I'd recommend laying a coat down now on the unsanded floor. When the time comes it'll sand easily and in the meantime it'll help penetrate/seal the surface enough that "immediate mop-ups" will prevent stains or damage. Unless you spill an acetone or something, but more fool you if ya do. BTW, I've also found that when doing the final sanding a prior coat of oil makes it easier to see any "low spots."

    I really wouldn't recommend trying this with a PolyU.

    As already mentioned, sheets are a good idea. I use those cheap blue Bunnies tarps, I use them for near everything, and haven't noticed any problems. Yet.
    I may be weird, but I'm saving up to become eccentric.

  10. #10
    Hwd Flooring Manufacturer glock40sw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Grafton, N.S.W.
    Age
    62
    Posts
    786

    Default

    G'day All.
    I've seen the result of people using plastic to cover floors.
    Severe cupping (like walking on corragated iron).

    Severe shrinkage (drop a biro between the tongue and groove of boards).

    Subfloor ply and/or battens pulled from the slab.

    bearers and joists lifted 60mm up fron the stumps.

    If it was my house, I wouldn't do it. too risky.

    Hooroo.
    Regards, Trevor.
    Grafton.

    P.S. coating with Tung Oil is a very good protector until final finishing.

  11. #11
    Hammer Head - 1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    I would be wacking a coat of cheap tung oil on with a mop, to protect and seal the floor, but cheack with the flooring company as they may "try" to charge extra to sand it off, other options above work well, no plastic as it causes problems as suggested.(look what happens when you cover your lawn with a tarp).

    Being in the bus, this stuff is 2nd nature BUT at home our living room which we laid 12 months ago is still waiting to be polished, no problems till our new pupy decided to pee on the bloody thing so now i am going to have to cut out the effected boards and replace as pupy pee is realy strong stuff and can even damage coatings.

  12. #12
    Member tcns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Another thought - head down to your local SES and ask if you can borrow a big tarp - canvas - might help keep the sweating to a minimum

    Tom

  13. #13
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Victoria
    Age
    64
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Hi i put down 165sq m's of Sydney blue gum in my house secret nailed and glued....when you have sanded it all and finished coated it you will be stoked! The sanding is simple BUT!!!! Its about 3 times as hard as Jarah...so it only takes...f...g days to get it all dead flat!
    Sinjin

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sinjin1111
    Hi i put down 165sq m's of Sydney blue gum in my house secret nailed and glued....when you have sanded it all and finished coated it you will be stoked! The sanding is simple BUT!!!! Its about 3 times as hard as Jarah...so it only takes...f...g days to get it all dead flat!
    Sinjin
    Thanks for that. We really love the richness and variety in the bluegum that we went for. What finish did you end up going with? I think we have settled on a semi-gloss finish - I love the full gloss but have been told y SWMBO that it will be too hard to keep clean.

    And did you live on the raw boards at all before they were polished?

  15. #15
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Victoria
    Age
    64
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Hi as you can imagine doing 165 sq m's on my own after work each night this wasn't a 2 evening job. So it took a couple of months....and of course surfing got in the way over summer as well. Like most renovaters, once i had started the job i could not see any logical reason to finish....wife could though...funny about that.
    I wouldn't be worried about stains as once you start sanding and its very big job anything that was there came off.
    As for finishs i'm very one eyed. From the time i started my apprenticeship i have only ever used 2 pac urethanes. The full gloss if you went that way i wouldn't be to worried about. It time it tend to soften...the glare that is. But the timber is incredibly hard. I had to buy a new compresser as it simply couldn't punch the staples i used to hold them down that staple gun is no longer available. My boards were secret nailed/stapled glued...took ages but well worth trhe effort.
    Sinjin

Similar Threads

  1. cheap temporary flooring?
    By sundancewfs in forum Flooring
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2nd Feb 2008, 05:32 PM
  2. Temporary Fire Panel for Cooktop
    By MasterOfNone in forum Kitchens
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2nd Jun 2007, 07:55 PM
  3. Oldest Living Tasmanian
    By Tankstand in forum Books, Videos & Plans
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29th Apr 2007, 11:57 AM
  4. Temporary benchtop
    By Shedhand in forum Kitchens
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28th Dec 2006, 12:26 AM
  5. Poles for temporary ceiling support
    By robson in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 27th Dec 2006, 08:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •