129723

Hire the best Flooring Expert and save up to 40%

What flooring is this?

Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default What flooring is this?

    Got a new place. I'm not sure what flooring is this. I think it is pine, but not sure what type.

    Attachment 128854

    In some locations there are big gaps between the boards and filled up. Seems like the timber floor had shrink with time creating those gaps.
    I was thinking of laying laminates over, or engineering flooring.

    Any replies appreciated.

  2. #2
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    15,439

    Default

    Jspan, can you use this site's image uploader for your pics.

  3. #3
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    Looks like a period home, from the limited pictures available I would tentatively say Baltic pine.

    Its a well regarded flooring for older home, on the soft side. The gaps are part of the character of older homes.
    Personal choice but there is no way I would lay laminate or engineered over the top.

  4. #4
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    Looks like a period home, from the limited pictures available I would tentatively say Baltic pine.

    Its a well regarded flooring for older home, on the soft side. The gaps are part of the character of older homes.
    Personal choice but there is no way I would lay laminate or engineered over the top.
    Thanks. Not a period home but just a classic weatherboard home.
    The reason for thinking about laying over it is the gaps between the some of the timber.

    Baltic pine is soft wood, am I right?

  5. #5
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    Thanks. Not a period home but just a classic weatherboard home.
    The reason for thinking about laying over it is the gaps between the some of the timber.

    Baltic pine is soft wood, am I right?

    High ceilings, open fireplace, picture rails, looks period from the photos.
    Any pine marks fairly easily.

  6. #6
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    How about laying hardwood over original floors? I read it is feasible.

    Glue/Nail down 3mm plywood, then Glue/Nail down blackbutt solid floor over it?

  7. #7
    1K Club Member Gooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    46
    Posts
    1,058

    Default

    Why? What problem are you trying to solve?
    I'm no expert, but know enough to be dangerous...
    __________________

  8. #8
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gooner View Post
    Why? What problem are you trying to solve?
    The pine floors are old, worn out with gaps between boards. Taking them out is difficult, so thinking of a suitable overlay

  9. #9
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,215

    Default

    That would be like powder coating a hand forged sculpture.
    Leave it as it is, or replace the floor board entirely.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  10. #10
    3K Club Member johnc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sale
    Age
    65
    Posts
    3,859

    Default

    Gaps are normal, the boards are unlikely to be worn out either

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    259

    Default

    it's radiata pine and looks like some has been sealed with oil based poly and some with water based poly.

    I have baltic pine in my hallway and lounge and have the same problem. borer and gaps. We are going to do a proper reno at some stage, so the band aid fix was to lay 12mm laminate over the existing floor with a 6mm underlay.
    No more draughts or spliters!

  12. #12
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by InsaneAsylum View Post
    it's radiata pine and looks like some has been sealed with oil based poly and some with water based poly.

    I have baltic pine in my hallway and lounge and have the same problem. borer and gaps. We are going to do a proper reno at some stage, so the band aid fix was to lay 12mm laminate over the existing floor with a 6mm underlay.
    No more draughts or spliters!
    I haven't got a closer look yet - waiting for settlement, but how can you tell the difference between the two? - radiata pine or baltic pine flooring

  13. #13
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    I haven't got a closer look yet - waiting for settlement, but how can you tell the difference between the two? - radiata pine or baltic pine flooring
    Sometimes it can be really hard to tell, Baltic tends to have lots of small knots in the timber while Radiata tends to have fewer and larger knots and sometimes the knots run sideways through the timber.
    Baltic generally were wider boards such as yours.

    Dusty a member on here has lots of examples on his website

    https://www.clintfudgefloorsanding.c...ic-pine-floors
    https://www.clintfudgefloorsanding.c...ta-pine-floors

  14. #14
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,215

    Default

    https://www.clintfudgefloorsanding.c...ic-pine-floors
    As you can see, someone in their infinite wisdom thought "Let's get these gaps filled, it'll look heaps better" - I'm sorry, but NO...it doesn't.
    Ha ha , reminds me of a property I bought in the nineties. Cypress pine covered with rotten carpet, and big gaps. Stripped the carpet and since the gaps were all large and even, I putty them with white putty. Can't remember the mixture I used but it was some home made brew. The outcome was rather pleasing and looked like the deck of a yacht. And the putty stayed put for some 20 years until we removed a wall and decided to replace the lot.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  15. #15
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default What flooring is this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    How about laying hardwood over original floors? I read it is feasible.

    Glue/Nail down 3mm plywood, then Glue/Nail down blackbutt solid floor over it?
    Very especially, but no need to install plywood between the timber.

    You can save some money and use 12-14mm overlay flooring, rather than 18mm solid.



    lk

  16. #16
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    Very especially, but no need to install plywood between the timber.

    lk
    I read in some threads some say plywood in necessary while some others says its not.

    Iím intending to lay the flooring in the same direction as the original.

    I consulted some and they said
    - 3mm plywood glue and nail over existing timber floor
    - 12-14mm solid timber, bostik ultra set glue and hidden nails.

    Am I right to say the glue is the main thing holding down the floors, the nails is primarily there to hold the floors down for the glue to set.

    Another question - how long should the hidden nails be? Should they be long enough to shoot through to the original timber floor?

  17. #17
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    How about this one? Radiate or Baltic flooring?

    Attachment 128874

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    259

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    How about this one? Radiate or Baltic flooring?

    looks like radiata to me

    the post above by Droog with the side by side comparison is pretty spot on. Radiata tends to have big round knots and wider grains. Baltic tends to have smaller knots and closer grains.

  19. #19
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    I would still lean towards Baltic due to the width of the boards, buts as said it can be very hard to tell.

    Do you know the era of the house ? or an outside picture so we can see the style and determine the era.

  20. #20
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default What flooring is this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    I read in some threads some say plywood in necessary while some others says its not.

    I’m intending to lay the flooring in the same direction as the original.

    I consulted some and they said
    - 3mm plywood glue and nail over existing timber floor
    - 12-14mm solid timber, bostik ultra set glue and hidden nails.

    Am I right to say the glue is the main thing holding down the floors, the nails is primarily there to hold the floors down for the glue to set.

    Another question - how long should the hidden nails be? Should they be long enough to shoot through to the original timber floor?


    I can't see what 3mm ply is going to do. It's not very strong, there's a reason why they use 12mm ply under floorboards.

    Yes, nails are really there just to hold the timber in place while the glue dries.

    You can install the new flooring parallel but ideally perpendicular.

    I'd get a rough sand to make the floor slightly flatter and a better bond for the glue.

    Yes, nails should shoot through to the bottom. I'd say 38mm secret nails will do.

    lk

  21. #21
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,215

    Default

    The glue is what holds the board down ... until a board that was not completely dry starts shrinking and pulling until the glue gives, usually at night with a big bang, and then it is back to the nails to keep it in it's new position.
    The 3mm plywood introduces an added weakness between the old floorboards and the new. Sanding of the old floorboards, glue an secret nail the new boards is the correct procedure.
    The plywood is directed at even out irregularities in the old floorboards. Rather than 3mm plywood, fix the old floorboards properly, screw down the lose one, adjust the joist or bearers under it to achieve level, rather than adding more problems for later to do an expedient job and run.

    A much better job is to lift the old boards and lay new ones. Simple really. And would probably cost the same if done by a competent person.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  22. #22
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    15,439

    Default

    I would go with a floating floor as you originally suggested, they look good, no hassle, insulate, no gaps, easy to replace.

  23. #23
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post

    A much better job is to lift the old boards and lay new ones. Simple really. And would probably cost the same if done by a competent person.
    I think it will cost much more to lift the old boards and then install new ones.

    Also you can't secret nail it (if that's your preference) nor could you use 12/14mm overlay boards which will increase the price.

  24. #24
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,215

    Default

    You can't secret nail tongue and groove boards?
    And you can not use overlay boards ... well sure, because you are not overlaying.
    And cost? Standard 19mm floorboards if sourced competently, can be cheaper than all that patch up idea of a fix. New floor and new skirting boards, rather than a backwards fix.
    I agree with Phil, a floating floor at least is honestly fake with no pretenses.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  25. #25
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default What flooring is this?

    Can't secret nail if there's no subfloor.

    Sk

  26. #26
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    I would still lean towards Baltic due to the width of the boards, buts as said it can be very hard to tell.

    Do you know the era of the house ? or an outside picture so we can see the style and determine the era.
    First sold 1984. Don’t know anything before.
    Attachment 128885

  27. #27
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default You have gold, donít cover it

    Almost certain they are Baltic pine going by the grain and also width of board. Donít put laminate over them, you will increase the value of tve house and itís way nicer (and cheaper) to have them sanded back and gaps filled. Laminate is always going to look like Laminate and engineered floating wood boards are limited lifespan (as with laminate). Iíd personally sand, lighten them with something like Bona White prime then coat with a water based poly to prevent yellowing. Baltic pine is already quite light though so you can also just sand and water base poly and keep them natural. Or go for a dark if thatís your go.

  28. #28
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    I can't see what 3mm ply is going to do. It's not very strong, there's a reason why they use 12mm ply under floorboards.

    Yes, nails are really there just to hold the timber in place while the glue dries.

    You can install the new flooring parallel but ideally perpendicular.

    I'd get a rough sand to make the floor slightly flatter and a better bond for the glue.

    Yes, nails should shoot through to the bottom. I'd say 38mm secret nails will do.

    lk
    Maybe the ply is to ensure the existing timber floor becomes flat. But if I do a ply in between that is like a double glue. Hmm.....

    I have existing hardwood floors in my current house, all nailed from the top to the bottom joists directly. So if i imagine I were to do an overlay, that original floor becomes the sub floor and I need to make sure that original floor is stable with no bounce. If there is a bounce I may have to nail it a couple more nails to secure it. Am I right?

    Any floor installers here?

  29. #29
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Basilratbrush View Post
    Almost certain they are Baltic pine going by the grain and also width of board. Don’t put laminate over them, you will increase the value of tve house and it’s way nicer (and cheaper) to have them sanded back and gaps filled. Laminate is always going to look like Laminate and engineered floating wood boards are limited lifespan (as with laminate). I’d personally sand, lighten them with something like Bona White prime then coat with a water based poly to prevent yellowing. Baltic pine is already quite light though so you can also just sand and water base poly and keep them natural. Or go for a dark if that’s your go.
    Thanks. But I am really confused now. Haha.

    I know old Baltic pine is gold but its still soft wood. Kids will kill it though.
    Beauty versus practicality.

  30. #30
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    First sold 1984. Don’t know anything before.
    Baltic was commonly used in Melbourne into the 1950’s, the original style of your house underneath the renovations could well fall into that era.

  31. #31
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Your best bet, and cheapest is to sand. Put a heavy duty top coat over and lots of rugs down. My aunt has Baltic pine in her farm house and raised two boys there from babies to 20 odds without an Issue. Itís always been a big entertaining house and stood the test of time. Sheís only just had them resanded recently to freshen them up. You will see a few superficial dents etc but thatís going to happen with any floor , wood it part of the character but scratched laminate looks awful! real wood you can always resand when the tome comes snd change the colour of stain unlike laminate which needs to be replaced when something goes wrong.

  32. #32
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,215

    Default

    I remember as a 5 year old, chiselling a hole in the oak parquet to play marbles with my brothers

    Keep your floor until it is really gone. Don't assume. There is always time to replace it, sometime down the track ... far away ... in 20 years.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  33. #33
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Basilratbrush View Post
    Your best bet, and cheapest is to sand. Put a heavy duty top coat over and lots of rugs down. My aunt has Baltic pine in her farm house and raised two boys there from babies to 20 odds without an Issue. Itís always been a big entertaining house and stood the test of time. Sheís only just had them resanded recently to freshen them up. You will see a few superficial dents etc but thatís going to happen with any floor , wood it part of the character but scratched laminate looks awful! real wood you can always resand when the tome comes snd change the colour of stain unlike laminate which needs to be replaced when something goes wrong.
    Iím now keen on an overlay using wider blackbutt flooring 13mm thick over the existing flooring.

    Iíve been googling around and also other houses and I think mine isnt baltic pine. Pretty distinct from the knots. I will confirm it when I get the keys.

    For those who lay solid flooring, how to choose between small width or wider boards? (90/130/180mm)
    I can imagine smaller width boards on big rooms dont look too nice

  34. #34
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    I’m now keen on an overlay using wider blackbutt flooring 13mm thick over the existing flooring.

    I’ve been googling around and also other houses and I think mine isnt baltic pine. Pretty distinct from the knots. I will confirm it when I get the keys.

    For those who lay solid flooring, how to choose between small width or wider boards? (90/130/180mm)
    I can imagine smaller width boards on big rooms dont look too nice
    If I remember correctly it is recommended to top nail wider boards due to the risk of cupping. With overlay flooring the usual method is to glue and secret nailing.

  35. #35
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Is it also necessary to put any vapour barrier on the existing timber floor?

    I understand it is necessary to sand the existing timber floor a little to (1) make sure it is thoroughly flat and (2) remove the finish, roughen the surface so the glue adheres well. Am I correct?

  36. #36
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default What flooring is this?

    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    If I remember correctly it is recommended to top nail wider boards due to the risk of cupping. With overlay flooring the usual method is to glue and secret nailing.
    Assuming moisture isn't an issue and the timber has acclimatised, risk of cupping is low.

    Had 180mm overlay hardwood in 2 houses fixed via secret nails and glue. No issues with cupping or gaps.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    Is it also necessary to put any vapour barrier on the existing timber floor?

    I understand it is necessary to sand the existing timber floor a little to (1) make sure it is thoroughly flat and (2) remove the finish, roughen the surface so the glue adheres well. Am I correct?
    No vapour barrier required as you're not on a slab.

    Correct. Good idea.

    You can ask the floor sander to do a rough sand.

    I got a floor sander to sand my yellow tongue upstairs before installing overlay blackbutt.

    All up around 150sqm for which he charged me around $300 from memory. Had other quotes that were 5 times the amount!

    Floor sander said he rarely sands yellow tongue, but I wanted it as the edges are never flat, plus glue works better without the wax.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    For those who lay solid flooring, how to choose between small width or wider boards? (90/130/180mm)
    I can imagine smaller width boards on big rooms dont look too nice
    It's all just personal preference.

    I used 180mm in my previous and current house as that was my preference.. but it's just my preference.

    Attached is a photo, used waterbased satin.

    lk

  37. #37
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default


    Had 180mm overlay hardwood in 2 houses fixed via secret nails and glue. No issues with cupping or gaps.
    How do you install the boards closer to the wall where its too tight for the floor nailer?
    Top nail or a finishing nailer at an angle through the tongue (still hidden)?


  38. #38
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default What flooring is this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jspan View Post
    How do you install the boards closer to the wall where its too tight for the floor nailer?
    Top nail or a finishing nailer at an angle through the tongue (still hidden)?

    Finishing nail on top on the first and last row.

    You just need to hold it down the the glue dries, so no need for large top nail.

    Not very noticeable.

    lk

  39. #39
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    Finishing nail on top on the first and last row.

    You just need to hold it down the the glue dries, so no need for large top nail.

    Not very noticeable.

    lk
    What brand of pneumatic floor nailer do you use? 16ga nails?

  40. #40
    JB1
    JB1 is offline
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melb
    Posts
    1,699

    Default What flooring is this?

    Bostik.

    Secret nails/staples are 15g

    Sent

Similar Threads

  1. Wall frame on flooring or next to flooring
    By MartinJS in forum Flooring
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12th Jun 2020, 11:02 PM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 16th Nov 2011, 11:58 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 8th May 2011, 10:38 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24th Jun 2007, 03:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •