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Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

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  1. #1
    JB1
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    With the way property prices are increasing, I'd decided to buy a cheap and cheerful rental in a regional town about 2.5 hours from me, sight unseen.

    It's cheap enough for me not to care too much for the building itself.

    Being cheap, unfortunately it has the original bathroom. And it's 2.5 hours so I don't have much time to fix it.

    Ideally one it can be spruced up over 1 weekend.

    Attached are the photos.

    What I'm thinking of doing is:
    - painting bath tub and tiled bench with Rust-Oleum Tub And Tile Refinishing Kit
    - Replacing basin with 600mm wall hung vanity and (quality ceramic disc) mixer. Will push vanity to the left corner.
    - replace bath tapware with some quarter/half turn taps (tenants can't overnighten), spout and shower head.
    - shower curtain

    Questions
    - Anyone use these DIY bath tub and tile paint before?
    - once the chrome finish on the bath waste, anything you can do about it other than replace the waste?
    - recommended paint to paint the green wall? There's some patterns to make me think it was tile that has been painted green.

    I'm sure this bathroom was fashionable at one stage, but pink bathtub and basin with green tiles?

    Any other suggestions would be appreciated.

    Keep in mind I won't have much time to fix it up. Needs to be 2 days max.

    Good thing is there's a big green shed nearby so I can pick up any bits and bobs along the way.

    S

  2. #2
    Golden Member havabeer's Avatar
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    I think you'll be VERY hard pressed to get all that done in two days. In this type of rental market, giving the bath room a total pretty up isn't going to really get you more rent compared to not doing it.

    if it was me i would:
    clean everything, even consider paying someone to come in before you get there to have cleaned it fully just to save a ton of time.
    replace all the tap washers (keep the taps)
    paint all the green white as best you can.
    re-silicon everything
    make sure there is a fan/vent in there
    make sure the shower curtain is working properly
    make sure the paint and timberwork are in ok condition

    I honestly wouldn't bother with trying to paint the bath or basin. I think the prep and drying times will kill your 2 day timeframe and is just gives something else to fail (chips from stuff dropped on it). I'd be much more focused on making sure the bathroom is serviceable and not going to require a ton of maintenance once a tenant is in.

    if you really want to jazz it up, go stick on some new acrylic panels over the existing ones and put some shelves in, where ever you can.
    Remember if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing

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    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    For me, the hand basin is a real turnoff and perhaps the bath too (although it might clean up with one of your magic erasers ). At the least, and if doable, I would replace the basin with something that offers a bit of space for items. Even something as simple as a bench with a drop in basin and maybe a simple shelf underneath..

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    I haven’t used the DIY refinishing kit but we had an avocado green bathtub, tiled above with white tiles and a strip of green tiles. We got one of those bathroom refinishing companies to make it all white. Done in a few hours. Looked OK and was fairly indestructible.

    The tiles looked like a refinish job because of the way it went over the grout. Tub looked better - felt like plastic but was pure opaque white.

    it appeared to be an epoxy.

    That’s what I would do again. As a long term landlord I don’t take on unfamiliar jobs which might keep a property off the market just to save a few dollars.

    Also, agree with previous comment - if I was a tenant my main problem would be lack of storage (somewhere to put all the bathroom products) ahead of the colour.

  5. #5
    JB1
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    Quote Originally Posted by havabeer View Post
    I think you'll be VERY hard pressed to get all that done in two days. In this type of rental market, giving the bath room a total pretty up isn't going to really get you more rent compared to not doing it.

    if it was me i would:
    clean everything, even consider paying someone to come in before you get there to have cleaned it fully just to save a ton of time.
    replace all the tap washers (keep the taps)
    paint all the green white as best you can.
    re-silicon everything
    make sure there is a fan/vent in there
    make sure the shower curtain is working properly
    make sure the paint and timberwork are in ok condition

    I honestly wouldn't bother with trying to paint the bath or basin. I think the prep and drying times will kill your 2 day timeframe and is just gives something else to fail (chips from stuff dropped on it). I'd be much more focused on making sure the bathroom is serviceable and not going to require a ton of maintenance once a tenant is in.

    if you really want to jazz it up, go stick on some new acrylic panels over the existing ones and put some shelves in, where ever you can.
    Good idea on getting the bathroom cleaned by someone else. I'll get the rental manager to recommend someone, plus they will then have the keys.

    Also need to check if there is a fan. If just a vent, will get fan installed. I think I'll leave the acrylic panels alone. If anything, I'd paint it with the Rust-Oleum Tub And Tile Refinishing Kit rather than replace it with another layer of acrylic panels.

    Good idea about the shelving. I don't know if there is any. I haven't seen the bathroom in person.

    Maybe need to budget 3 days- a bit tight but do-able. But will need to come back a few days after after the 3nd day to caulk/finish off.

    Day 1. Clean bathroom- Remove shower curtain. I'm not really sure what's required to paint the green walls. Need to test if it's oil based or water based. If oil based, then I will need to prime with oil based undercoat which blows out the time. Then again, it's pretty small. so say 1 day.

    Day 2, Replace sink with vanity (won't install plumbing yet) Tile section above vanity with subway tiles. Sand bathtub and some of the tiles to be painted. Install plumbing if time permits. Paint walls. Paint Bathtub 1st coat. Leave because I heard it's stinks, so you want to do as much as you can before the end of the day.

    Day 3. Complete plumbing. Replace bath tapware, showerhead and shower curtain. Tile section above vanity with subway tiles. Paint 2nd coat bathtub.

    Day 7. Come back to grout and silicone.

  6. #6
    JB1
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    Quote Originally Posted by phild01 View Post
    For me, the hand basin is a real turnoff and perhaps the bath too (although it might clean up with one of your magic erasers ). At the least, and if doable, I would replace the basin with something that offers a bit of space for items. Even something as simple as a bench with a drop in basin and maybe a simple shelf underneath..
    Most definately, it is a real turn off. I wouldn't feel clean after washing my hands in there haha.. hence why the vanity was priority #1. Then I thought, you know, let's tackle the bathtub and other tapware too.. lol... hmm that green wall would look better in white... you know how it goes.

    If I lived closer, I'd gut the whole bathroom. New shower, vanity and tile the whole lot within a 10 days. Alas, it's just too far for me to DIY, nor would the cheap rent warrant me paying someone to re-do it all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arron View Post
    I haven’t used the DIY refinishing kit but we had an avocado green bathtub, tiled above with white tiles and a strip of green tiles. We got one of those bathroom refinishing companies to make it all white. Done in a few hours. Looked OK and was fairly indestructible.

    The tiles looked like a refinish job because of the way it went over the grout. Tub looked better - felt like plastic but was pure opaque white.

    it appeared to be an epoxy.

    That’s what I would do again. As a long term landlord I don’t take on unfamiliar jobs which might keep a property off the market just to save a few dollars.

    Also, agree with previous comment - if I was a tenant my main problem would be lack of storage (somewhere to put all the bathroom products) ahead of the colour.
    What did it cost you to recoat the bathtub and tiles?. I haven't been able to get a quote because I don't have the keys yet. I will ask the agent early if it's possible to access to the property for some repairs before settlement.

    Yeah will definitely put shelving in there.

  7. #7
    The Master's Apprentice Bedford's Avatar
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    How many similar places are for rent at this time?

    If there's not many you could probably just get a decent clean and lease it as it is.
    Posted by John2b, And no, BEVs are not going to save the planet, which doesn't need saving anyway.

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    On a side note, can you spot the chick[en] in those tiles?
    Love it when DIYERS pin the blame on plumbers for their own shoddy work

  9. #9
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plum View Post
    On a side note, can you spot the chick[en] in those tiles?
    More than one.

  10. #10
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
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    I have used the tile paint and it's ok, the latest one used was the water based renovation range, it was easy to apply, dries quick, does not smell.

    The trick with any tile paint is the prep, if you don't do it correctly don't waste your time painting it, as the paint will just come off.
    I haven't done a bath, I would leave this for a professional, as it's a high use / harsh appliance that needs a commercial type coating.

    I would tend to leave it as is, try and get the stains out of it, and just go with it's colour, if you paint the walls / ceiling / tiles white it won't really stand out.
    Probably go with black tap, shower shelf and shower soap dish as black works well with pink, and will sort of look like it was meant to be that way

    Put a new floor mounted vanity this will give storage, some new tiles behind the vanity, subway is ok, or cheap 600 x 300 white gloss to keep it simple and minimise grout.
    Actually I wouldn't bother painting any tiles, just tile straight over them with new tiles and use Davco SMP EVO, it's designed for this purpose, will save a lot of time, and look a lot better.

    New shower curtain, or you can retrofit a swinging glass door (done this before and it looked much better, but was in brick walls so mounting points were guaranteed).

    No need for slow drying oil based undercoat, use the Dulux Oil based primer below, dry in under 1.5 hours, I usually put water based undercoat over the top of it, but according to Dulux you can topcoat straight over it..
    It's really good stuff, blocks all sorts of stains other wont, such as very difficult Tannin stain etc..

    Use bathroom / kitchen paint as it has mould blockers

    Be aware drilling into the walls most likely Asbestos from the look of those panels and joiner strips.

    Also check exhaust fan, just put a new one in to be sure, new light would be good if the one there is crap.

    Can't see you getting it done in two days, if you want to start painting tiles, the prep takes a while and then there are multiple coats etc it all takes time.

    I would skip this idea and tile over them, will be a lot quicker obviously new tiles behind new vanity, Davco have a grout / glue product, so you glue then grout straight away with the one product.
    I would still go separate, you can glue in the morning, and then grout the next morning, or if really pushed, glue morning, grout in the afternoon, done it before and didn't seem to be an issue.




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  11. #11
    Golden Member havabeer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    Good idea on getting the bathroom cleaned by someone else. I'll get the rental manager to recommend someone, plus they will then have the keys.

    Also need to check if there is a fan. If just a vent, will get fan installed. I think I'll leave the acrylic panels alone. If anything, I'd paint it with the Rust-Oleum Tub And Tile Refinishing Kit rather than replace it with another layer of acrylic panels.

    Good idea about the shelving. I don't know if there is any. I haven't seen the bathroom in person.

    Maybe need to budget 3 days- a bit tight but do-able. But will need to come back a few days after after the 3nd day to caulk/finish off.

    Day 1. Clean bathroom- Remove shower curtain. I'm not really sure what's required to paint the green walls. Need to test if it's oil based or water based. If oil based, then I will need to prime with oil based undercoat which blows out the time. Then again, it's pretty small. so say 1 day.

    Day 2, Replace sink with vanity (won't install plumbing yet) Tile section above vanity with subway tiles. Sand bathtub and some of the tiles to be painted. Install plumbing if time permits. Paint walls. Paint Bathtub 1st coat. Leave because I heard it's stinks, so you want to do as much as you can before the end of the day.

    Day 3. Complete plumbing. Replace bath tapware, showerhead and shower curtain. Tile section above vanity with subway tiles. Paint 2nd coat bathtub.

    Day 7. Come back to grout and silicone.
    i used to think this was the case as well, but i called up dulux when painting our rental not too long ago. The tech support man basically said you can use any primer (water or oil based) and go over it with what ever you want. The main reason people used oil based paints is that they give much higher gloss then water will, but thats also its down fall the gloss resists other paint to it which is why you're meant to scuff it up with sand paper before painting. but once its dry its dry.

    also in your time plan: ALLOW FOR STUFF TO GO WRONG! its an old home with old problems, budget for this
    Remember if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing

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    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    Actually I wouldn't bother painting any tiles, just tile straight over them with new tiles and use Davco SMP EVO, it's designed for this purpose, will save a lot of time, and look a lot better.


    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    Can't see you getting it done in two days, if you want to start painting tiles, the prep takes a while and then there are multiple coats etc it all takes time.

    I would skip this idea and tile over them, will be a lot quicker obviously new tiles behind new vanity, Davco have a grout / glue product, so you glue then grout straight away with the one product.


    Is this the same Davco product or 2 different types!

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    JB1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bedford View Post
    How many similar places are for rent at this time?

    If there's not many you could probably just get a decent clean and lease it as it is.
    I'll be able to rent it out for sure, but the issue is, the better the place is, the better tenant that you will get. You don't want to be offering it to the only applicant.


    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    I have used the tile paint and it's ok, the latest one used was the water based renovation range, it was easy to apply, dries quick, does not smell.

    The trick with any tile paint is the prep, if you don't do it correctly don't waste your time painting it, as the paint will just come off.
    I haven't done a bath, I would leave this for a professional, as it's a high use / harsh appliance that needs a commercial type coating.

    I would tend to leave it as is, try and get the stains out of it, and just go with it's colour, if you paint the walls / ceiling / tiles white it won't really stand out.
    Probably go with black tap, shower shelf and shower soap dish as black works well with pink, and will sort of look like it was meant to be that way

    Put a new floor mounted vanity this will give storage, some new tiles behind the vanity, subway is ok, or cheap 600 x 300 white gloss to keep it simple and minimise grout.
    Actually I wouldn't bother painting any tiles, just tile straight over them with new tiles and use Davco SMP EVO, it's designed for this purpose, will save a lot of time, and look a lot better.

    New shower curtain, or you can retrofit a swinging glass door (done this before and it looked much better, but was in brick walls so mounting points were guaranteed).

    No need for slow drying oil based undercoat, use the Dulux Oil based primer below, dry in under 1.5 hours, I usually put water based undercoat over the top of it, but according to Dulux you can topcoat straight over it..
    It's really good stuff, blocks all sorts of stains other wont, such as very difficult Tannin stain etc..

    Use bathroom / kitchen paint as it has mould blockers

    Be aware drilling into the walls most likely Asbestos from the look of those panels and joiner strips.

    Also check exhaust fan, just put a new one in to be sure, new light would be good if the one there is crap.

    Can't see you getting it done in two days, if you want to start painting tiles, the prep takes a while and then there are multiple coats etc it all takes time.

    I would skip this idea and tile over them, will be a lot quicker obviously new tiles behind new vanity, Davco have a grout / glue product, so you glue then grout straight away with the one product.
    I would still go separate, you can glue in the morning, and then grout the next morning, or if really pushed, glue morning, grout in the afternoon, done it before and didn't seem to be an issue.




    Cheers, good advice.

    I did read the Davco SMP EVO spec sheet and it stated it's not for painted surfaces.

    I have the opportunity to visit next week and will scratch the green paint to see how well it's bonded. If it's bonded well, painting is the preferred option.. but will definitely tile above the vanity. a couple of 600x300 tiles may suit better.

    I'll take down some measurements.. I'll see what size tiles will suit best with less cutting.

    Reason I prefer wall hung is that I know that the bottom of the vanity will suck up moisture and swell. Plus wall hung will make it feel more spacious.

    Could you recommend a Bathroom and Kitchen paint? I'll be using that Dulux sealer and undecided paint for the section below the bath and skirting.

    Good choice on the black tapware, great mind think alike... haha

    Who knows, pink may come back in fashion one day.

    Quote Originally Posted by havabeer View Post
    i used to think this was the case as well, but i called up dulux when painting our rental not too long ago. The tech support man basically said you can use any primer (water or oil based) and go over it with what ever you want. The main reason people used oil based paints is that they give much higher gloss then water will, but thats also its down fall the gloss resists other paint to it which is why you're meant to scuff it up with sand paper before painting. but once its dry its dry.

    also in your time plan: ALLOW FOR STUFF TO GO WRONG! its an old home with old problems, budget for this
    OK, good to know about waterbased undercoats. I may use that Dulux PRECISION® High Opacity Stain Blocker Metrix recommended. 1.5hr recoat time is quick. Plus it will be early summer by the time I get the keys... I remember painting oil based enamel in Melbourne's winter.. look weeks to cure.. haha

    Thanks for all the suggestions so far.. I'll make up my mind once I see it in person. In particular if I can clean the stains from the bathtub.. if I can't then I'll have to decide whether to DIY enamel or get a Pro in.

    At the very least, it will be new vanity and tiles above vanity and tapware... everything else is still open.

    I don't really like to take too many shortcuts but the situation is tradies will be hard to come by 2 weeks before Christmas, and I want to have tenants in there before Christmas.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    I'll be able to rent it out for sure, but the issue is, the better the place is, the better tenant that you will get. You don't want to be offering it to the only applicant.




    Cheers, good advice.

    I did read the Davco SMP EVO spec sheet and it stated it's not for painted surfaces.

    I have the opportunity to visit next week and will scratch the green paint to see how well it's bonded. If it's bonded well, painting is the preferred option.. but will definitely tile above the vanity. a couple of 600x300 tiles may suit better.

    I'll take down some measurements.. I'll see what size tiles will suit best with less cutting.

    Reason I prefer wall hung is that I know that the bottom of the vanity will suck up moisture and swell. Plus wall hung will make it feel more spacious.

    Could you recommend a Bathroom and Kitchen paint? I'll be using that Dulux sealer and undecided paint for the section below the bath and skirting.

    Good choice on the black tapware, great mind think alike... haha

    Who knows, pink may come back in fashion one day.



    .
    So the tiles under the bath, you might want to tile over them, few problems first you wont find a glue that would warrant that as there are too many opportunities for something to go wrong, and the new tiles will protrude past the bath line opening up a new problem to alleviate this.

    Alternatives are to remove the tiles and tile again this would be time consuming, so you may have no choice but to repaint them, you could use the specific tile paints,
    Really need to determine what's on there currently, I would say it's oil based enamel, possibly lead based, you can test for this easily with a lead test kit.

    Easy way to check what's on there, rub the various paints with metho, if the paint transfers to the rag its some sort of water based, if it does not, it's oil based.
    To test if the paint has a good bonding, place gaffa tape onto the surface, give it a few minutes, then pull off quickly, if the paint comes off then you have a poor bond.

    If it lead based you can sand it lightly to roughen up the surface, just have to use wet and dry and spray water onto the surface to keep any dust away, then you can prime and paint it, clean up any sanding drips and throw away any rags etc use to clean up.

    To repaint, if it's oil enamel, you could just use this again, if you choose white, go for a slight grey white as it hides the yellowing of the enamel paint, or just go for a tile paint as these don't yellow, remember prep / drying time is the most important for tile paints.

    Apply these using the 100mm / 4mm nap microfibre rollers, these give a flawless finish.

    https://www.dulux.com.au/how-to/proj...oom%20%2Bpaint

    Paint for the walls, Dulux kitchen and Bathroom, British Paints all have anti mould with 7 year guarantee.
    Maybe wear some protective eyeware like this chick



    For the vanity, you can get them with legs instead of timber plinth, so keeps any timber off the floor, wall hung look better but may present a problem installing, also bear in mind it's location to the shower it may get wet, so robust construction is a must, cheapy ones may fall apart.

    Pink is actually a hot colour again in bathrooms, a feature wall of pink is the ticket.

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by phild01 View Post




    Is this the same Davco product or 2 different types!
    Two different ones, SMP EVO can do tile over tile
    Premixed Sanitized Glue Grout is the other one.
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    The area below the bath may also not be tiles but simply one of the patterned sheets, potentially containing asbestos so careful if sanding.

    Oil based prep coats are nothing like Enamel top coats with regard to drying time, other option is using the shellac based prep coat particularly if there are signs of water stains in the old paint.
    https://www.dulux.com.au/products/details/30sx383a

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    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    The area below the bath may also not be tiles but simply one of the patterned sheets, potentially containing asbestos so careful if sanding.

    Oil based prep coats are nothing like Enamel top coats with regard to drying time, other option is using the shellac based prep coat particularly if there are signs of water stains in the old paint.
    https://www.dulux.com.au/products/details/30sx383a
    The oil based Dulux is a bit easier to use vs the shellac one, They are both great product and both will stop any stain from coming through, the shellac, tends to settle in the can and can be a bugger to get going again, sounds weird but it actually dries too quick for some jobs.

    I have both and they both do the job stated on the can, haven't had any stains applied to come through either of them, the water based version does not work, stains come through it.
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  18. #18
    JB1
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    So the tiles under the bath, you might want to tile over them, few problems first you wont find a glue that would warrant that as there are too many opportunities for something to go wrong, and the new tiles will protrude past the bath line opening up a new problem to alleviate this.

    Alternatives are to remove the tiles and tile again this would be time consuming, so you may have no choice but to repaint them, you could use the specific tile paints,
    Really need to determine what's on there currently, I would say it's oil based enamel, possibly lead based, you can test for this easily with a lead test kit.

    Easy way to check what's on there, rub the various paints with metho, if the paint transfers to the rag its some sort of water based, if it does not, it's oil based.
    To test if the paint has a good bonding, place gaffa tape onto the surface, give it a few minutes, then pull off quickly, if the paint comes off then you have a poor bond.

    If it lead based you can sand it lightly to roughen up the surface, just have to use wet and dry and spray water onto the surface to keep any dust away, then you can prime and paint it, clean up any sanding drips and throw away any rags etc use to clean up.

    To repaint, if it's oil enamel, you could just use this again, if you choose white, go for a slight grey white as it hides the yellowing of the enamel paint, or just go for a tile paint as these don't yellow, remember prep / drying time is the most important for tile paints.

    Apply these using the 100mm / 4mm nap microfibre rollers, these give a flawless finish.

    https://www.dulux.com.au/how-to/proj...oom%20%2Bpaint

    Paint for the walls, Dulux kitchen and Bathroom, British Paints all have anti mould with 7 year guarantee.
    Maybe wear some protective eyeware like this chick



    For the vanity, you can get them with legs instead of timber plinth, so keeps any timber off the floor, wall hung look better but may present a problem installing, also bear in mind it's location to the shower it may get wet, so robust construction is a must, cheapy ones may fall apart.

    Pink is actually a hot colour again in bathrooms, a feature wall of pink is the ticket.


    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    The area below the bath may also not be tiles but simply one of the patterned sheets, potentially containing asbestos so careful if sanding.

    Oil based prep coats are nothing like Enamel top coats with regard to drying time, other option is using the shellac based prep coat particularly if there are signs of water stains in the old paint.
    https://www.dulux.com.au/products/details/30sx383a
    I'll just repaint the area under the bath.

    It's not a high wear area anyway.

    Particularly if it potentially has lead, I'll just clean it well with sugar soap and use the stain blocker undercoat. And then bathroom paint.

    If there's a chance of lead, I'll use that as an excuse not to sand it down. Haha

    I've used shellac before, but as Metrix has said, it dries too quick.. so oil based undercoat it is, good to know it's quick drying.

    Great idea regarding the vanity with legs. I forgot those existed.

    Any suggestions on brands that build quality pre-fab vanity units that are more moisture resistant?

    Anyone have opinion of the quality of Ikea vanities?

    S

  19. #19
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    A rental is a commercial proposition. Expenses are tax deductible if you are smart.
    Either stay home and rent as is after a good clean, or pay for a bathroom renovation without much pretenses.
    Trying to do a DIY rush job, is a waste of your time and a guarantee of a poor result.
    “It is not necessary to accept everything as true, one must only accept it as necessary”
    Franz Kafka

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    I would go for something like Aquanamel under the bath, if it gets wet and you use standard wall paint it will get grubby real quick,

    Another alternate is to put a clearcoat over the wall paint if you want to use it down there, or just spray it with a can, the paint in these are pretty tough.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    A rental is a commercial proposition. Expenses are tax deductible if you are smart.
    Either stay home and rent as is after a good clean, or pay for a bathroom renovation without much pretenses.
    Trying to do a DIY rush job, is a waste of your time and a guarantee of a poor result.
    basically this. my rush bathroom job and house pretty up to about 3 or 4 months.

    a tidier bathroom doesn't get you better tenants. raising the rent MIGHT get you a better tenant but its not guaranteed.
    Remember if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing

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    JB1
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    I would go for something like Aquanamel under the bath, if it gets wet and you use standard wall paint it will get grubby real quick,

    Another alternate is to put a clearcoat over the wall paint if you want to use it down there, or just spray it with a can, the paint in these are pretty tough.

    Ok noted. Thanks Metrix.

    I have some aquanamel at home. Saves me buying it.

    Cheers


    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    A rental is a commercial proposition. Expenses are tax deductible if you are smart.
    Either stay home and rent as is after a good clean, or pay for a bathroom renovation without much pretenses.
    Trying to do a DIY rush job, is a waste of your time and a guarantee of a poor result.
    Sorry gotta disagree there Marc.

    Initial repairs before you rent out the property is not tax deductible in the same way stamp duty is not a tax deduction.

    You have to admit, even a new vanity will dramatically improve the bathroom.



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    Well ... I did qualify " if you are smart"
    “It is not necessary to accept everything as true, one must only accept it as necessary”
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Well ... I did qualify " if you are smart"
    I think the word you're looking for is is tax fraud haha

    Search up 'initial repair' https://www.google.com/amp/s/propert...rovements/amp/




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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    Sorry gotta disagree there Marc.

    Initial repairs before you rent out the property is not tax deductible in the same way stamp duty is not a tax deduction.

    You have to admit, even a new vanity will dramatically improve the bathroom.
    I agree, don’t listen to the negativity, the changes you are proposing are not major things, but will make a big difference in a room like yours and won't cost a lot to get a lot of gain.

    The three things I see that you can't do much with and will just need a good clean, the bath, the patterned wall and the tiles at the end of the bath.

    I think of various rentals I have stayed in between house projects, in the bathrooms the things that peed me off were, no storage, crap lighting, fan’s that didn’t work and the rooms filled up with condensation, shyte shower heads, nowhere to put your soap in the shower and lack of storage.

    You don't have to entirely rip out the bathroom and replace it to get a good result, I have done plenty of bathroom jobs for clients exactly as you are doing, ie just a quick tidy up to sell or rent.
    It's all about being selective and smart with what you do, I think you know the drill.

    A coat of paint in a non-offensive white can do wonders for any room, especially if you are covering up an awful colour chosen by the previous owners.

    In this current house they painted various rooms in paint I assume they got for free, one bedroom was Tandoori orange, as soon as it was painted white even without touching anything else in the room it looked 1000 times better, same as the lounge room that was darker caramel, and the main bedroom that was forest green, even the garage that was dark apricoty pink, looks major difference in white.

    Also all the architraves / skirting’s were a very dark brown, covering these up in white has made them disappear instead of being an eyesore.

    Once you paint over that green, the room will appear a lot lighter and bigger, bold colours in small rooms make them look small.

    You don't have to spend a fortune doing the work initially, you can always redo the bathroom at a later stage if the need arises to bring in more rent and it's tax deductible.

    I would do the following.

    1: Clean everything down with sugar soap, mould killer if there is any, Selleys have a Rapid mould killer in trigger form that works very effectively and it's quick, it does stink so bear that in mind so maybe do this first and turn the exhaust fan on, vinegar is a fallacy it doesn’t work, I have tried it many times with no luck.

    2: Remove the basin and splashback

    3: The window frame is most likely oil based enamel, clean with sugar soap and very light sand with 180 just to smooth down any contaminates, coat with Zinsser oil based cover stain.

    4: Under bath tile thing, if they are tiles then very light sand with a 120 block is fine, if you think it's asbestos then just sugar soap and coat with zinsser cover stain.

    5: Water Based undercoat the walls / ceiling / window frame and under bath.

    6: Topcoat the walls and ceiling in low sheen white "Kitchen / Bathroom" type paint that has mould inhibitors, British Paints or Dulux have 7 year mould protection (or so they say on the can) don’t bother with separate ceiling / wall paint just do them all in the one low sheen makes it much easier to paint

    7: Fit a new vanity with mixer tap, go floor mounted with legs as these are easier to fit, or wall mounted if you can get one that has decent storage

    8: New splashback tile

    9: Remove the shower / bath taps and reseat the base, the tool is cheap, just don’t go crazy and grind too much from them, only enough the expose fresh flat brass is enough.

    10: Replace the taps with ceramic disk spindles, you can buy handle / ceramic sets from Bunnings that come with everything you need, make sure to follow the instructions on installing them, they are very easy to install but I have seen people stuff them up by adding plumbers tape which made them leak and don’t overtighten them, ceramic is good as heavy handed renters can’t damage them as easy.

    Note, Does the house have mains hot water as it looks fairly old it might have gravity fed, if so I would stick to regular type of taps as I don’t think the half turn stuff work properly with gravity fed ?
    I also take back my suggestion to go black tapware, I would go chrome as it’s a rental, black taps can easily be damaged by aggressive cleaners, as you can’t control what a renter will be using chrome is a better longer lasting option.

    11: New bath spout and shower head (make sure you can get under the showerhead)

    12: New shower curtain

    13: Fit a mirror on the wall next to the vanity (note fresh paint in not happy to have silicon stuck to it until it cures at least 7 days, so leave a patch of wall unpainted where the mirror will go, use DS tape and mirror silicon to affix it)

    14: Fit a soap holder and a shelf in the shower, you will have to work this out based on wall construction, you can glue them on with something like Selleys hold up, make sure to choose ones with a decent amount of wall contact surface to facilitate gluing on

    15: Fit a new exhaust fan if the old one is stuffed

    16: Fit new light if the old one is shyte, or at least tidy it up somehow, new brighter LED globe makes using the room a lot better at night.

    17: Fit a towel rail if there i snot one already there

    18: If the grout in those bath end tiles is really shyte, I found this Dunlop product shown below works really well, squeeze it on, wipe off excess and let dry, once it's cured it was really resistant to chemicals.

    The bath waste can be easy to replace but they can also be a real pain, if you can get under the house easily to get it of makes it easier, but these old baths generally had galvanised pipes, and really heavy duty fixings, couple this with years of corrosion and you could be up for a real challenge to get it out.

    Get some magic erasers, you may find these can help with the bath stains, and Jif is a good product at removing stubborn stains.

    With the undercoat, just get a 1L or Zinsser cover stain, you don't need a lot as it will only be used for various components, the rest can be covered in regular water based undercoat.

    Put some pics up of the finished product.

    reseat.jpg
    zinsser.jpg
    grout.jpg
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    I think the word you're looking for is is tax fraud haha

    Search up 'initial repair' https://www.google.com/amp/s/propert...rovements/amp/

    Initial repairs before you rent out the property is not tax deductible in the same way stamp duty is not a tax deduction.
    I think you should read and understand the link you provided, https://www.google.com/amp/s/propert...rovements/amp/ before throwing around words like "Tax fraud", that sort of comment can clearly and unnecessarily sow seeds in peoples minds.......


    What is an initial repair?


    In other words, if you buy a property to generate income, the cost of bringing that property to a state where it’s suitable for tenants is considered part of the cost of its acquisition, not a cost of repairing defects that arose while you were renting it.

    You can’t claim an immediate deduction for initial repairs, even if you start to rent the property before you carry out the repairs.

    Generally, the cost of the initial repairs may be included in the capital gains tax cost base of your rental property.


    What are capital works deductions?

    If you own a rental property, you can deduct certain kinds of construction expenditure.

    These are called capital works deductions, and would generally be spread over a period of 25 or 40 years.

    Your total capital works deductions can’t exceed the construction expenditure, and you can’t claim a deduction before the construction is complete.

    Posted by John2b, And no, BEVs are not going to save the planet, which doesn't need saving anyway.

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    Ignoring the comments deprived from wit, the important consideration is the end result as opposed to doing nothing.
    Unless the OP is in search of a hobby to keep busy, in which case anything goes.

    A rental is a business despite the fact that 71% of rentals are single property investors and are mainly treated as a hobby.

    Tenant and also future buyers will demand more that what the average DIY can offer, in the short time the OP is prepared to spend.
    Any improvements you intend to make in 2 days max, will scream, rush cheap job.

    My opinion is to clean it real well, and rent it as is. Save up for a bathroom and kitchen renovation plus paint and do it as soon as there is a vacancy, possibly professionally. Local rental manager will have local trade lined up for this.
    Consult with your accountant the timing and staggering of works in order to maximise tax avoidance.
    Avoid disparaging those who want to help you.
    “It is not necessary to accept everything as true, one must only accept it as necessary”
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    With a rental - it’s always a question of ‘will it pay off in higher rent - or in reasonable tenants rather than scummy tenants’?

    A year ago, I was going to repaint my rental property - and even considering a new kitchen to replace the 40-year old kitchen. But the agent said it wouldn’t make a difference to the rent - so I saved myself from several late nights of painting.


    Do a really good clean (get in there and get every speck of dirt and mildew out). I would consider painting that bathroom white though instead of the green.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joynz View Post
    With a rental - it’s always a question of ‘will it pay off in higher rent - or in reasonable tenants rather than scummy tenants’?

    A year ago, I was going to repaint my rental property - and even considering a new kitchen to replace the 40-year old kitchen. But the agent said it wouldn’t make a difference to the rent - so I saved myself from several late nights of painting.


    Do a really good clean (get in there and get every speck of dirt and mildew out). I would consider painting that bathroom white though instead of the green.
    I found if the place looks dated and daggy it attracts a different type of tenant, the rent may be the same but the tenant is different and this can make a big difference, typically one who doesn't care too much because the place looks very dated can cause bigger issues over the tenancy.

    I would definitely paint over that green, what he is proposing to do is not a lot of cost or work, can easily knock it over in a weekend as it's basically painting a very small room, and replacing vanity, not a hard job.
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Been away camping over the long weekend here in Victoria.

    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    I agree, don’t listen to the negativity, the changes you are proposing are not major things, but will make a big difference in a room like yours and won't cost a lot to get a lot of gain.

    The three things I see that you can't do much with and will just need a good clean, the bath, the patterned wall and the tiles at the end of the bath.

    I think of various rentals I have stayed in between house projects, in the bathrooms the things that peed me off were, no storage, crap lighting, fan’s that didn’t work and the rooms filled up with condensation, shyte shower heads, nowhere to put your soap in the shower and lack of storage.

    You don't have to entirely rip out the bathroom and replace it to get a good result, I have done plenty of bathroom jobs for clients exactly as you are doing, ie just a quick tidy up to sell or rent.
    It's all about being selective and smart with what you do, I think you know the drill.

    A coat of paint in a non-offensive white can do wonders for any room, especially if you are covering up an awful colour chosen by the previous owners.

    In this current house they painted various rooms in paint I assume they got for free, one bedroom was Tandoori orange, as soon as it was painted white even without touching anything else in the room it looked 1000 times better, same as the lounge room that was darker caramel, and the main bedroom that was forest green, even the garage that was dark apricoty pink, looks major difference in white.

    Also all the architraves / skirting’s were a very dark brown, covering these up in white has made them disappear instead of being an eyesore.

    Once you paint over that green, the room will appear a lot lighter and bigger, bold colours in small rooms make them look small.

    You don't have to spend a fortune doing the work initially, you can always redo the bathroom at a later stage if the need arises to bring in more rent and it's tax deductible.

    I would do the following.

    1: Clean everything down with sugar soap, mould killer if there is any, Selleys have a Rapid mould killer in trigger form that works very effectively and it's quick, it does stink so bear that in mind so maybe do this first and turn the exhaust fan on, vinegar is a fallacy it doesn’t work, I have tried it many times with no luck.

    2: Remove the basin and splashback

    3: The window frame is most likely oil based enamel, clean with sugar soap and very light sand with 180 just to smooth down any contaminates, coat with Zinsser oil based cover stain.

    4: Under bath tile thing, if they are tiles then very light sand with a 120 block is fine, if you think it's asbestos then just sugar soap and coat with zinsser cover stain.

    5: Water Based undercoat the walls / ceiling / window frame and under bath.

    6: Topcoat the walls and ceiling in low sheen white "Kitchen / Bathroom" type paint that has mould inhibitors, British Paints or Dulux have 7 year mould protection (or so they say on the can) don’t bother with separate ceiling / wall paint just do them all in the one low sheen makes it much easier to paint

    7: Fit a new vanity with mixer tap, go floor mounted with legs as these are easier to fit, or wall mounted if you can get one that has decent storage

    8: New splashback tile

    9: Remove the shower / bath taps and reseat the base, the tool is cheap, just don’t go crazy and grind too much from them, only enough the expose fresh flat brass is enough.

    10: Replace the taps with ceramic disk spindles, you can buy handle / ceramic sets from Bunnings that come with everything you need, make sure to follow the instructions on installing them, they are very easy to install but I have seen people stuff them up by adding plumbers tape which made them leak and don’t overtighten them, ceramic is good as heavy handed renters can’t damage them as easy.

    Note, Does the house have mains hot water as it looks fairly old it might have gravity fed, if so I would stick to regular type of taps as I don’t think the half turn stuff work properly with gravity fed ?
    I also take back my suggestion to go black tapware, I would go chrome as it’s a rental, black taps can easily be damaged by aggressive cleaners, as you can’t control what a renter will be using chrome is a better longer lasting option.

    11: New bath spout and shower head (make sure you can get under the showerhead)

    12: New shower curtain

    13: Fit a mirror on the wall next to the vanity (note fresh paint in not happy to have silicon stuck to it until it cures at least 7 days, so leave a patch of wall unpainted where the mirror will go, use DS tape and mirror silicon to affix it)

    14: Fit a soap holder and a shelf in the shower, you will have to work this out based on wall construction, you can glue them on with something like Selleys hold up, make sure to choose ones with a decent amount of wall contact surface to facilitate gluing on

    15: Fit a new exhaust fan if the old one is stuffed

    16: Fit new light if the old one is shyte, or at least tidy it up somehow, new brighter LED globe makes using the room a lot better at night.

    17: Fit a towel rail if there i snot one already there

    18: If the grout in those bath end tiles is really shyte, I found this Dunlop product shown below works really well, squeeze it on, wipe off excess and let dry, once it's cured it was really resistant to chemicals.

    The bath waste can be easy to replace but they can also be a real pain, if you can get under the house easily to get it of makes it easier, but these old baths generally had galvanised pipes, and really heavy duty fixings, couple this with years of corrosion and you could be up for a real challenge to get it out.

    Get some magic erasers, you may find these can help with the bath stains, and Jif is a good product at removing stubborn stains.

    With the undercoat, just get a 1L or Zinsser cover stain, you don't need a lot as it will only be used for various components, the rest can be covered in regular water based undercoat.

    Put some pics up of the finished product.


    Many thanks for your advice Metrix.

    Spot on as always.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Ignoring the comments deprived from wit, the important consideration is the end result as opposed to doing nothing.
    Unless the OP is in search of a hobby to keep busy, in which case anything goes.

    A rental is a business despite the fact that 71% of rentals are single property investors and are mainly treated as a hobby.

    Tenant and also future buyers will demand more that what the average DIY can offer, in the short time the OP is prepared to spend.
    Any improvements you intend to make in 2 days max, will scream, rush cheap job.

    My opinion is to clean it real well, and rent it as is. Save up for a bathroom and kitchen renovation plus paint and do it as soon as there is a vacancy, possibly professionally. Local rental manager will have local trade lined up for this.
    Consult with your accountant the timing and staggering of works in order to maximise tax avoidance.
    Avoid disparaging those who want to help you.
    As I stated, we'll agree to disagree.

    In terms of disparaging remarks? Lol.. none of that going on. seems like you're happy to dish out some banter but can't take it.

    Quote Originally Posted by joynz View Post
    With a rental - it’s always a question of ‘will it pay off in higher rent - or in reasonable tenants rather than scummy tenants’?

    A year ago, I was going to repaint my rental property - and even considering a new kitchen to replace the 40-year old kitchen. But the agent said it wouldn’t make a difference to the rent - so I saved myself from several late nights of painting.

    Do a really good clean (get in there and get every speck of dirt and mildew out). I would consider painting that bathroom white though instead of the green.
    2 reasons I want to make it nicer.

    1st is not financial.

    I wouldn't want to live in a place that has a bathroom like that. Very old and dated with no storage. I wouldn't want to subject my tenants to that. Plus if I can spend a weekend or two to make it infinitely better, it's no big deal in terms of cost to me or loss rental.

    2nd is financial.

    As I stated above, if you're a good tenant, you're not going to want to rent a place with a bathroom like that, particularly if one of the tenants are ladies.

    You're most likely going to get a tenant who has been knocked back everywhere else.

    I'm hoping to find a good long term tenant. This is financially beneficial to me.

    I've always had good tenants at my rental properties. Legitimate repairs attended to, no rent increases while the tenants have stayed there, etc.

    This strategy has worked very well for me in the past and I hope to continue it.

    Your suggestion of a very good clean is great, I'm just taking it a little step further.




    alk

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    JB1 your inbox is full
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by METRIX View Post
    JB1 your inbox is full
    Sorry, deleted some message. Cheers

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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Had a chance to visit yesterday.

    Firstly, bathtub wasn't as bad as I thought.

    There was some staining but came off pretty quickly with some elbow grease.

    You can see where I scrubbed it with jif/scourer. Reason for staining is that the showerhead is rusty, so that's good news. There is a small area which has worn away the enamel. But no plans to enamel to white.

    'Tiled' wall. It's not tiles but plastic wall panels with a tile pattern. I'd say it's no more than 3mm thick the way it flexes haha.

    It looks like it's been painted with (green) regular wall waterbased paint.

    I'm thinking of giving it a good clean with sugar soap and painting it with 1 coat Haymes Ultra Premium waterbased sealer/undercoat and then 1 coat white Haymes aquanamel?

    Is there a benefit to paint an undercoat, or should I just do 2 coats of aquanamel?

    Will paint the architrave and the mirror vanity grey Aquanamel to break up all the white walls

    Ceiling is grotty but at least there's a barely working fan that can be replaced.

    I'm not sure what the marks on the ceiling are. Hopefully it will come off easily with some sugar soap.

    If it cleans well, I'll just do 1 coat Haymes Ultra Premium waterbased sealer/undercoat on the ceiling and walls (above the faux tiled walls and shower panels) and then 1 coat white low sheen Solagard.

    Or should I skip the sealer/undercoat and do 2 coats white Solagard?

    If the stains don't scrub off the ceilings- I'll use Zinsser or Dulux oil based Stain Blocker.

    Reason why Solagard? Because it has mould inhibitors and I have about 8L left from painting my soffits.

    Shower/Bath Breech.

    I can't recall what the standard depth of is, but does the breech protrude more than normal?

    I wish to replace the shower and bath wall top assembly taps with these https://www.bunnings.com.au/mondella...p-set_p5002777

    Haven't installed any wall tops for 8 years so can't remember if the depth of this breech may going to give me problems installing these taps.

    Will also
    -retile over existing 800x800 tiled bench.
    -Replace shower rose with hand held shower
    -Replace shower shelf.
    -replace Vinyl floor.

    I arranged for a quote to clean the whole house as it was a piss poor effort akin to selling a knock down house.

    Agent said owner may allow access for painting before settlement which is great. I'll be pushing it to install new vanity.

    Had a look in my garage, have white and grey aquanamel, water based sealer/undercoat and Solagard. Prefer to use up what I have leftover if suitable.

    Pretty sure I have some Zinner shellac somewhere if I can find it.

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    JB please upload your pics, no links.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phild01 View Post
    JB please upload your pics, no links.
    OK.. couldn't link/upload them using Tapatalk.

    Also having trouble with the site's image upload function. I can't upload from the PC/Phone, can only load via a URL


    q8bmrhp.jpg

    8qwtlxj.jpg


    7f9jkwu.jpg


    xmrawv7.jpg

    0injhr2.jpg

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    Thanks JB, yes maybe an issue with your pic file sizes but I understand Tapatalk is the go to for uploading pics.

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    and people want to think the bathroom/shower niece is a new trend.... that shaving cabinet begs to differ.


    couple of points:

    with the hand held shower, be prepared for the tenants to spray that thing every where.
    if you can, while re-tiling the shelf thing... put some fall BACK towards the shower so any water that gets on there doesn't just go straight on the floor
    i would 100% undercoat everything you intend to paint. give it the best chance of sticking. Also helps slightly with blocking the colour underneath.
    buy a heap of bathroom silicon and just squirt the stuff everywhere.
    Remember if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing

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    Some good advice there.

    Will undercoat everything.

    I'll still install a hand shower. I suppose they could spray it everywhere but makes it so much easier to clean the bath with the hand shower.

    The more I think about that shelf, the more I think I'll just I'll just paint it with shellac and then two coats of aquanamel (undecided on white or grey). Will also paint small section between shelf and bathtub.

    Funny you should mention silicone. There's not much mouldy silcone because there is very little silicone anywhere! lol.. no silicone on internal corners of shower panels, nor any silicone where the shower panels meet the bathtub so the panels move quite a bit. I will try to squirt some silcone behind the panels where it meets the tub so you can't see it. Prefer not to see the silicone.. I doubt there's pink silicone to match.. haha

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    Some good advice there.

    Will undercoat everything.
    Yes, this will hide a lot of the green, will still need two topcoats to get rid of it altogether

    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    I doubt there's pink silicone to match.. haha
    You can find anything, just need to know where to look

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    JB1
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    haha.. pink silicone it is

    It's actually hard to decide what colour silicone to use... you have pink bathtub and a speckled white panel.

    I'm most likely use Sika 300ml Mid Grey SikaSeal Kitchen And Bathroom Silicone Sealant https://www.bunnings.com.au/sika-300...alant_p1210405

  41. #41
    Golden Member havabeer's Avatar
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    use black silicon and you'll never have to worry about seeing mould on it
    Remember if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing

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    JB1
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    Quote Originally Posted by havabeer View Post
    use black silicon and you'll never have to worry about seeing mould on it
    That's just cheating! haha

    Black unfortunately stand out too much.

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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Soo I've bought this ex display 800mm wall hung vanity via FB. Paid for it, just need to pick it up. For $200, she'll do. Looks like it comes with a pop up waste too.

    Space for the vanity is around 900mm, but not sure it walls/tiled shelf thingy are square, so 800mm is safer than a 900mm vanity.

    Being not my house, I'd thought I'll install some legs on it incase the tenants sit or attempt to concieve on it haha

    At the back, I'll screw a piece of ~70x35 pine horizontally between 2 studs for the unit to sit on.

    Question 1- for the front of the unit 2 x 40mm black metal leg OR 1 x rectangular frame made out of 70x35mm pine painted black?

    I'm thinking black rectangular frame. Looks more substantial.

    Note, black rectangular frame is only 1 at the front, not one on each end like a table.

    Question 2. 800mm vanity, 900mm space.

    Should I butt the vanity to the left against the wall or install it in the middle, i.e. 50mm gap each side?

    Would be easier to connect the waste if it was in middle for this 'plumber'.



    lk

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    Metrix did a great post a while ago about the best and strongest way to install a wall hung basin - using roofing screws and metal angle. See post #2 here:

    https://www.renovateforum.com/f205/wall-hung-vanity-installation-query-125862/


    It sounds like it would be rock solid done the way he described.

    And would mean no need to add legs or a frame - which would make the bathroom look more spacious.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    Looks like it comes with a pop up waste too.


    lk
    Suggest you get rid of that and replace with a regular waste, popups can give you grief. You don't want the tenant needing a plumber$$$.

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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by joynz View Post
    Metrix did a great post a while ago about the best and strongest way to install a wall hung basin - using roofing screws and metal angle. See post #2 here:

    https://www.renovateforum.com/f205/wall-hung-vanity-installation-query-125862/


    It sounds like it would be rock solid done the way he described.

    And would mean no need to add legs or a frame - which would make the bathroom look more spacious.
    I do have some roofing screws lying around too.

    I don't really know where the studs are located.

    If I can find a length of reasonable sized/ thick angle that I have, I'll use that. Otherwise some pine painted will have to suffice.

    If it was my own place, I wouldn't bother with the legs but I don't know what abuse it may cop. So to play it safe I still want to do legs of some sort.

    Perhaps framed legs on each side will look less bulky and be stronger too. Thoughts?


    lk

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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Quote Originally Posted by phild01 View Post
    Suggest you get rid of that and replace with a regular waste, popups can give you grief. You don't want the tenant needing a plumber$$$.
    Good point but I have a suspicion that it would already be siliconed in place which would be a PITA to replace.

    Fingers crossed it's a quality one, or if it fails, the tenants are happy to just remove the pop up bit.

    Se

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    Quote Originally Posted by JB1 View Post
    I do have some roofing screws lying around too.

    I don't really know where the studs are located.

    If I can find a length of reasonable sized/ thick angle that I have, I'll use that. Otherwise some pine painted will have to suffice.

    If it was my own place, I wouldn't bother with the legs but I don't know what abuse it may cop. So to play it safe I still want to do legs of some sort.

    Perhaps framed legs on each side will look less bulky and be stronger too. Thoughts?


    lk
    If you can’t find any studs, then legs are probably the best idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joynz View Post
    If you can’t find any studs, then legs are probably the best idea.
    I'll be able to find at least 1 stud but I think to be safe, I'll also install legs of some sort.

    Question is, 2 metal legs, single large framed leg (front) or 2 smaller framed legs (side)?

    I think I prefer the framed legs as it's sturdier but not sure if the single framed leg or 2 smaller framed legs will look better?

    And if I go 2 framed legs, do I turn the timber for the frame e.g. using 70x35pine- from the front, do I see 70mm thick legs or do I see 35mm thick legs?

  50. #50
    JB1
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    Default Quick spruce up of rental property bathroom

    Due to distance and a family dinner, I only didn't have a full day at the property.

    A few hours were spent cleaning the bathroom ceiling and walls. And then wiping it down with clean water.

    Sugar soap with a microfibre cloth seems to work much better than a sponge.

    Got rid of most of the dirt/grease that seems to acculumate when you don't use a fan.

    Gee that green is hard to cover.

    That's one coat of Zinsser Bullseye 123 and another coat of Solagard low sheen on the walls and ceiling.

    Will need another 1 to 2 coats of solagard.

    Window frame, medicine cabinet had 1 coat of Bullseye 123. Will sand down and then paint/mini roller with 2 coats of dark grey aquanamel. Going dark grey to break up the all white bathroom, save for the pink bathtub

    Will see how the Bullseye 123 holds up on tiles. Once fully cured, if it doesn't scratch off, I'll paint it with white aquanamel.

    I'll be able to knock off the above in half a day as the prep work is done. Will use to other half day to paint the kitchen, laundry and toilet ceiling.

    Laundry ceiling has mildew, I will need to scrub clean and cover with oil based Shellac (have 1/2 a can that's about 15 years old!). I don't think the Bullseye 123 has enough mildew covering properties.

    Once I get the keys to the house, I'll install the bathroom vanity, change new showerhead and all the taps in the bathroom and kitchen.








    lk

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