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Want to remove bathroom/toilet wall myself. How to?

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  1. #1
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    Cool Want to remove bathroom/toilet wall myself. How to?

    So we just moved into a flat and the bathroom and toilet are both tiny. We are thinking of removing the wall between them and changing a few things around without it
    a) costing more than $500
    b) we want to reuse all the tiles and fittings
    c) keeping most of it the same.

    We have no idea about renovations and are really just looking at estimates. Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Resigned SilentButDeadly's Avatar
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    Not a hope in Hades. Flat owners normally only own the space created by the walls...not the walls themselves. You can change the wall surfaces but not (typically) the walls. Check your title.

    Either way it certainly can't be done for $500 nor can you re use tiles (unless you fancy a mosaic).

    Live with the flat a little. Learn what you can deal with. Think slowly about what you might like to live with in the future...and then do something about it.
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  3. #3
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    We've done a few reno's in flats removing the odd wall here and there to make larger bathrooms but $500, way out of the ballpark.

  4. #4
    2K Club Member barney118's Avatar
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    How do you know if the wall is load bearing or not?
    cheers Look out if I have a tape measure in my hand.....I'm upto something

  5. #5
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    First find out if the wall is load bearing or not. Ask a pro to look at it. Likely you'll be lucky with this.

    Aside from that, you need to factor in any plumbing or electrical work. If you can avoid any alterations of these, you will significantly lower the cost.

    Also consider if what you do compromises the waterproofing (more cost). Not all areas of bathroom require full waterproofing but this depends on the layout of your bathroom, relation of shower/bath to the area you are altering, etc.

    If you get past all these hurdles without much pain and you get materials (cheaply) and do all the work yourself (better start researching how to), you could do pretty well on cost.

    Lots of ifs and buts tho.

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    You'll also need approval from your body corporate before you demolish anything!

  7. #7
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    Is the wall masonry or timber framed?

  8. #8
    4K Club Member ringtail's Avatar
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    A - absolutely no chance
    B - absolutely no chance
    C - why bother if you want to keep "most of it the same"

  9. #9
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    To give you some idea of "Real world" costs.
    We just did a small bathroom renovation, and I do mean small, 1800*1800; we estimated $12,500 and it wound up costing $16k.

  10. #10
    2K Club Member barney118's Avatar
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    firstly, you haven't mentioned if the units are single level/ ie ground level or you are part of a multi storey (I assume you own this !), if the latter you wouldn't have a hope in hell as the wall is likely to be part of the overall structure and bring considerable issues with body corporate etc of damaging other properties, however I cant see the issue if we are talking ground level dwelling/block non load bearing situation as others have mentioned please enlighten me.

    I helped my dad remove a non load bearing wall between his toilet and bathroom which was at the junction of the shower. There was some considerable rot in the walls of the shower (1970's build and no waterproofing used, or no signs except zinc angles in the corner which did nothing).

    Your budget is going to hold you back to start, the repair to the gyprock/cornice/joins will look like that, a repair. You will find a difference in matching floor tiles alignment (unless this would be a "feature") You will most likely find the floor levels be different and slope in different directions (water pooling later).

    If there are any electrical wiring in the wall then based on the comments in the electrical forum, your budget is blown away before you start with the call out fee for the sparky), sorry guys I couldn't resist that one.

  11. #11
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Sadly as many have said you are expecting too much. As Shauck and others have said you need to find out much more info such as is it a timber or brick wall, is it load bearing and so on. In either case you can't 're-use tiles', you might be able to reuse fittings of what you mean are things like toilet roll holder and towel rails, not any of the ceramic/ porcelain ones. As soon as you try to move anything then you'll need a plumber - for $500 they might come out and tell you what needs doing! You'll have a gap where the wall was an no matching tiles to fill it. And on it goes. Ringtail said it simply - no way Jose! And others have raised the issue of body corporate permission etc. SilentButDeadly offers sage advice - wait and see.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ringtail View Post
    C - why bother if you want to keep "most of it the same"
    I think they just want a bigger area.

  13. #13
    4K Club Member ringtail's Avatar
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    Hit and run by the looks of it anyway

  14. #14
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    shauck is right, we just want more space. I'll fill in the details and maybe it might make more sense.

    My mother in law owns it and has said to get an idea on costings.
    I meant $5000.
    Its single story.
    I dont think the wall is load baring. There would be some plumbing/electrical I dare say...
    The body corperate are a-ok with it as it wont affect any other flats (theyre joined together by a garage)

    Ideally we would like to keep the 'feel' the same, reusing tiles would have been nice but if it's not possible then its not possible. I'd like to remove the wall myself but I'm not sure where to start? Its just a plaster wall and the rest of the house is brick. the bath tub and shower are against the wall and I'd like to remove them both and have a claw footed bath with a rain maker shower fixture put in instead, just free standing in the middle and not move the toilet or sink. Anything I can do to keep costs down would be great!

  15. #15
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    Best to take a pic so we can see. Is it a shower over bath at moment? Is it the foot of the shower/bath against the wall you want removed? Are there any power points on that wall? Do any electrical cables run through that wall? That may be a hard question to answer without taking off the tiles and plaster. Perhaps a sparky may be able to tell you this one.

    What you are saying is more than just opening up the space. Any time you move plumbing, it can get expensive. If you want your plumbing moved to come down through the ceiling, I imagine it will be a big job involving plumber, rip out of majority of tiles, proper waterprooofing to suit this design and a big re-tiling job.

    If you can find a way to stick closer to the original plumbing and be happy with the design, you will keep cost down. Perhaps post in the bathroom section where experts in this can tell you how to minimise costs through keeping the job simple.

  16. #16
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Quote Originally Posted by celeste88 View Post
    shauck is right, we just want more space. I'll fill in the details and maybe it might make more sense.

    My mother in law owns it and has said to get an idea on costings.
    I meant $5000.
    Its single story.
    I dont think the wall is load baring. There would be some plumbing/electrical I dare say...
    The body corperate are a-ok with it as it wont affect any other flats (theyre joined together by a garage)

    Ideally we would like to keep the 'feel' the same, reusing tiles would have been nice but if it's not possible then its not possible. I'd like to remove the wall myself but I'm not sure where to start? Its just a plaster wall and the rest of the house is brick. the bath tub and shower are against the wall and I'd like to remove them both and have a claw footed bath with a rain maker shower fixture put in instead, just free standing in the middle and not move the toilet or sink. Anything I can do to keep costs down would be great!
    Now that makes more sense. If the wall is timber and not load-bearing (need to check that - it might be carrying joists even of not roof loads) then easy enough to open that all up. Useful to grab one of those room planner sheets with to-scale graph lines - and draw the room up. Then you can cut out scale sized items (bath, shower, toilet etc) and see how they fit. Tiles should be just neutral - use furnishings to provide variety and colour etc.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

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