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What are your thoughts on polished floors in the kitchen?

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  1. #1
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    Default What are your thoughts on polished floors in the kitchen?

    Ive got timber floors in the lounge and dining room.The old kitchen had lino that Im ripping up and installing a new kitchen.

    Im planning to polish the floorboards in the lounge, dining and continue it into the kitchen.

    any pros or cons to this?

    whats your preference for kitchen floors?


  2. #2
    Pretend my avatar moves! bitingmidge's Avatar
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    No Cons.

    Easy to maintain, looks flash, warm underfoot, more gentle on dropped things than tiles.

    Cork is the best by far, it's very resilient and drops just bounce back into your hands. Pity it's soo uncool.

    P

  3. #3
    Member markharrison's Avatar
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    Our last house had polished floorboards in the kitchen. It was fine.

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    Senior Member munruben's Avatar
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    I have been thinking of doing the same in my office but was a bit worried as to how the floor would stand up to the constant rolling back and forth of the office chair. Anyone got timber floor in their office?
    Cheers, John
    Just a thought: If you borrow money from a pessimist, do they expect to get it back?
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  5. #5
    scooter
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    I agree with Darren re: cork. It's a great surface, shame about the look of it.

    Only con with polished boards in the kitchen is that if they're pine, they will collect a lot of dings that can look average. The nice look of the polished timber may outweigh concerns about this though.

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    4K Club Member OBBob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by munruben View Post
    I have been thinking of doing the same in my office but was a bit worried as to how the floor would stand up to the constant rolling back and forth of the office chair. Anyone got timber floor in their office?
    You could get a higher quality chair with rubber casters or you can get the clear plastic mats that they tend to put on carpet, which would also stop the scratches.

  7. #7
    Fossil Member Pops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markharrison View Post


    Our last house had polished floorboards in the kitchen. It was fine.
    Hi Daren,

    Have lived in houses with Jarrah boards, pine boards, tiles, slate, concrete, vinal and lino (for those that can remember it).

    So, I agree with Mark, BM and Scooter. No problem with timber floorboards, however a hardwood would be my preference. I intend to put Jarrah boards in my kitchen, one day. Then I can build the kitchen. Joy!!

    Better on the feet than tiles I reckon and, like others have said, things get a better chance to live after falling on timber as opposed to harder surfaces.

    This question has been raised before, regarding slip issues with timber. Do a forum search for more info. For me slip hazards on timber floors in a kitchen are minimal, not much differenet to some other surfaces. And really, how much running does one do in the kitchen anyway?

    I would also be happy to continue the floor covering in the main living areas into the kitchen. Usually this continuity looks better than a change in materials, but it depends on the layout of course.

    If the kitchen timber floor is prepared and sealed professionally then you should have no problems with it from the normal wear and spillage of any kitchen. Just my opinion though, I do like timber floors.

    Give us an update when the job is done Daren.

    Cheers
    Pops

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    thanks for the replies everyone

    will post an update with pics when done, Pops. Might be awhile though, as Ive got to do a complete bathroom and kitchen first.

    That reminds me - I had a thought of polishing the floors in the kitchen before installing the new kitchen. (The kitchen is completely gutted at the moment.)

    By polishing the floors first I thought it might cut out the hassle of sanding right up against the cabinets. But the usual is to do the floors last right?

    (Still havent decided to get a pro to do the floors or have a chop myself)

    thoughts?

  9. #9
    Pretend my avatar moves! bitingmidge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by munruben View Post
    I have been thinking of doing the same in my office but was a bit worried as to how the floor would stand up to the constant rolling back and forth of the office chair. Anyone got timber floor in their office?
    Yep. All good, but we live at the beach so there tends to be a fair amount of grit turns up underfoot, and it's easy to get scratches where the wheels are if you aren't careful.

    If you buy a good quality chair, you can get soft castors made for hard floors - do that and you won't have any troubles.

    Cheers,

    P

  10. #10
    Fossil Member Pops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daren View Post
    thanks for the replies everyone

    will post an update with pics when done, Pops. Might be awhile though, as Ive got to do a complete bathroom and kitchen first.

    That reminds me - I had a thought of polishing the floors in the kitchen before installing the new kitchen. (The kitchen is completely gutted at the moment.)

    By polishing the floors first I thought it might cut out the hassle of sanding right up against the cabinets. But the usual is to do the floors last right?

    (Still havent decided to get a pro to do the floors or have a chop myself)

    thoughts?

    Hi Daren,

    I am a patient man so am happy to wait for the update.

    Well, funny you should doing the floors before the kitchen install. Why? Because that is exactly what I have been considering for a while. I reckon whether the pros do it or I do it, it has to be easier and faster. Downside is, the kitchen installers need to be a bit more careful with the floors. Sounded an OK thing to do to me.

    Yes, I do believe it is usual that the kitchen is installed first, you save a bit on not sealing the timber under the cabinets too I guess.

    There may be other very good reasons to do the usual, kitchen first, floors polished second, but others may need to help out here.

    Pro vs DIY sanding/sealing of floor. Some friends have done it and were happy with the result, others were not. For me, (one who is basically lazy and reluctant to learn the skills on my own floor and probably stuff it up) I would go with the Pros, particularly for a large area /several rooms. But it can be done with top results DIY.

    Cheers
    Pops

  11. #11
    2K Club Member barney118's Avatar
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    Post timber floors

    Quote Originally Posted by OBBob View Post
    You could get a higher quality chair with rubber casters or you can get the clear plastic mats that they tend to put on carpet, which would also stop the scratches.
    Hi, this is my first post as I was looking for something else for myself, however I can tell you I have baltic pine floorboards in the sunroom/computer room approx 50yrs old and I had them polished with most of the house 5 years ago and they came up quite good, however with the computer chair moving (wheels) I started to get a fine cracks which looked like the laquer was peeling in my haste I decided to pull some off thinking it would just peel off (flake) however I was WRONG and it split the timber and required glueing sanding and a mini reno on the floorboard. Now I have a mat to put the chair on and I am much wiser.

  12. #12
    scooter
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    Gday Barney, welcome, & thanks for chiming in.


    Cheers................Sean

  13. #13
    Champion Messmaker Dirty Doogie's Avatar
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    DEfinitely sand the floor before your cabinets go in if you can - much easier.

  14. #14
    Diamond Member Terrian's Avatar
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    we (meaning me!) redid the kitchen about 10 years ago, about 4 weeks ago I got around to sanding the floor (again) and sealing it with Cabots CFP water based polyurethane, then last weekend we (ie: me) removed almost everything from the laundry and added the same finish to there.
    A pic I just took:

    dsc00255.jpg

    The missus loves the finish. The Cabots CFP is great, 1/2hr and you can walk on it, 3hrs between coats - sand between coats. Cost about $95 for 4lt, enough to do the kitchen & laundry

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty Doogie View Post
    DEfinitely sand the floor before your cabinets go in if you can - much easier.

    so, you think sand AND polish before installing the kitchen. Or should I sand only - install the klitchen then polish ??

  16. #16
    A Member of the Holy Trinity silentC's Avatar
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    We sanded and finished our kitchen floor first, then the buffalo who came to install the kitchen put a big ding in it where he stood the pantry cupboard on it's corner and left some nice scuffs and scratches in it, so I would say maybe sand first and finish after the cupboards, that way it's easier to repair any damage before applying the finish. Either that, or put down one coat of finish over the whole thing and then a second coat after the install.
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the kind of person I'm preaching to."

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pops View Post
    ...and, like others have said, things get a better chance to live after falling on timber as opposed to harder surfaces.

    Quarry tiles - a good way to get rid of things you don't like

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by silentC View Post
    We sanded and finished our kitchen floor first, then the buffalo who came to install the kitchen put a big ding in it where he stood the pantry cupboard on it's corner and left some nice scuffs and scratches in it, so I would say maybe sand first and finish after the cupboards, that way it's easier to repair any damage before applying the finish. Either that, or put down one coat of finish over the whole thing and then a second coat after the install.
    yeah ok, I think I might sand first, finish after the cupboards are in then

  19. #19
    Son of a Handyman jmk89's Avatar
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    We put parquet through our last house including the kitchen and the deal there was:
    1. sand and one coat on the floor
    2. install kitchen
    3. clean floor and put final coats on.
    The initial coat means that the wood is protected under the cupboards and the sink/dishwasher. That sealing is very useful if you have a water leak....
    Cheers

    Jeremy

    When a thing's done, it's done, and if it's not done right, do it differently next time - Arthur Ransome

  20. #20
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    Just saw & read this post while searching for something else.

    I'm going to continue the polished boards from the lounge room into the kitchen, & also into the hall. The kitchen & lounge are next to each other with the hall running off in line with the kitchen. I think it will look better to polish all three, as you can see from one to the other clearly from most spots depending on where you're looking from. 99.9% of the time I will see 2 of the areas simultaneously, so it will look good.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails pc030005.jpg  

  21. #21
    Golden Member GraemeCook's Avatar
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    Hi Daren

    We have 100+ year old Tas Oak floorboards in our kitchen sealed with one-pot estapol polyurethane. Its very comfortable, forgiving if we drop things and easy to maintain. It wears a little unevenly in doorway, in front of sink and in front of a work bench. As soon as wear starts to be visible we wash the floor thoroughly, lightly resand and apply another coat of polyurethane.

    At the moment we have one-pot estapol, but if I ever get the floor back to bare wood then I'll use two-pot for the extra durability.

    What I suggest that you do is:

    • Clean the floor thoroughly using ammonia to remove all trace of wax and fat.
    • Put a metal strait edge across the floorboards and if there is any sign of cupping or bowing then get the floor professionally sanded. You do not want to learn the skills on your highly visible kitchen.
    • If the floor is flat then sand it yourself using a large random orbital sander. And sand through the grades of sandpaper from about 60 to 1,000 grit. The last grit determines the quality of finish.
    • Punch all visible nails and putty holes as necessary. Resand here.
    • Vacuum thoroughly at least three times, then wipe with a cloth moistened in turps to remove all sawdust.
    • Apply with smooth roller one coat of polyurethane (preferably two pot), wait ten minutes then wipe off the poly with a smooth rag (old sheet). Wiping smooths the polyurethane into the poors of the timber and helps smooth the final coat.
    • Dry overnight then apply another coat of polyurethane.
    • Next morning sand lightly, ROS with 500 and 1,000 grit, clean thoroughly and carefully brush on final coat of polyurethane.

    This should give a highly glossy floor which should be kept clean with fresh water. About every two years lightly sand and brush on another coat of polyurethane to keep it fresh.

    Never use wax, silicon or other commercial polishes on the floor as you then cannot retouch the floor without removing all microscopic traces of the polish.

    Cheers

    Graeme

  22. #22
    1K Club Member arms's Avatar
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    remove old kitchen ,sand entire floor ,seal floor with one coat of sealer ,install kitchen then when all trades have finished top coat floor ,remember to lay a thin peice of mdf or ply on the floor to roll the fridge over back into position
    kind regards
    tom armstrong
    www.kitcheninabox.com.au
    Flat Packed kitchens to the world

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