Hire the best Painter

Cornice Cement vs Liquid Nails?

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2

    Default Cornice Cement vs Liquid Nails?

    Hi, This is my first post... I love this forum already.

    I went down to the local hardware store to buy cornice cement to cover the gap between the ceiling and the inbuilt wardrobe and was advised to use liquid nails rather than cornice cement as it provides the same strength, without the mess. I was sceptical, but was pursuaded to buy the liquid nail. Now I am thinking twice and not sure what to do. The section I need to do is about 3 metres.
    Has anyone ever put up cornices up using liquid nails? Is there any reason as to why I should not do this?

    Thanks.
    Badb0y

  2. #2
    Golden Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Morley WA
    Posts
    559

    Default

    Funny you should bring this up cause I've been thinking along the same lines but using silicon sealant which I've recently used to stick ceramic tiles up in an overhead situation which worked a treat with instant grab and was recomended by Selleys over liquid nails.

    Having recently installed the cornices in a couple of rooms I agree cornice cement its messy, and as I have few more rooms to do I'm considering the silicon, but will do a test first.

    Theres only a couple of draw backs that I can see, one being the cost of liquid nails / silicon to cornice cement and the other is if silicon is used and it is squeezed out there maybe a problem in painting the affected area.

  3. #3
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    I've got to disagree. It might be alright for sticking a few tiles on, but not for cornices. If you don't put enough liquid nails on to squeeze out between the gap, then you'll be left with a gap. If you do put enough on, then it will be impossible to smooth it off. That stuff is like chewing gum and you'll end up with a horrible mess trying to scrape off the excess. You'll never get it smooth. If any does drop on the carpet it will be impossible to remove it. Cornice cement dissolves in water, even after it's dry.

    Put a drop sheet down before you fix the cornice in case any does drop. Butter each edge, press it in place, scrape off the excess then wipe it with a sponge and the job is done.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  4. #4
    Golden Member Harry72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Pirie SA
    Age
    50
    Posts
    844

    Default

    If your making lots of mess with cornice cement your mixing it too thin.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW, Australia
    Age
    59
    Posts
    113

    Default

    We had to use both!

    The walls were that horrid wood-grain paper veneer stuff, so I rang a gyprock mob to check what adhesive to use. They were very helpful, and recommended cornice cement for the cornice-to-gyprock edge, and liquid nails for the cornice-to-wall edge.

    The nice thing about cornice cement is what pawnhead mentioned - the smoothing trick. I was told to brush over the joints with a damp paint brush (same idea as the sponge, I guess. Softening again with water). No sanding needed, and a neat, clean finish.

    Cheers,
    Andrew

  6. #6
    quality + reliability - 3k Club Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,315

    Default

    My view is to leave the liquid nails in the cupboard, for many of the reasons already listed above.

    However I would not use cornice adhesive on the timber. I would used screws to screw the cornice to the timber and cornice adhesive along the ceiling edge. Use the cornice adhesive to finish off the mitres and patch the screw holes. Then use a paintable sealant along the bottom edge.

    The cornice adhesive cleans up well as does the sealant. The liquid nails would be an absolute nightmare to clean up if you got on any surface not intended.

    Cheers

    Rod
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT


  7. #7
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thanks guys. You're feedback was very valuable.
    I'm still not 100% sure, but think I will use cornice cement and find some other use for the liquid nails.
    Cheers.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Broken Hill
    Posts
    107

    Default Cornice cement vs Liquid nails

    did that last weekend...
    paint on the ceilings and new gyprock on the walls.. cement just wouldn't stick - so me and the missus used selly's quickgrab LN...
    as to finishing... well, LN cleans up with water - and we had no bother wiping along the 'gap' with a damp/wet rag... then sunday after the LN had cured, we went round with a stanley scraper and cut off all the little snots left, then gunned a bead of No-Gap over the top, finger-smoothed it and today looks like a brazillion dollars...
    will take pics if'n you'd like to see
    cheers
    Jedo
    When all the world said I couldn't do it - they were right...

  9. #9
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Age
    62
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jedo_03 View Post
    paint on the ceilings and new gyprock on the walls.. cement just wouldn't stick - so me and the missus used selly's quickgrab LN...
    If there was paint on the ceiling then it wouldn't grab as fast. Normally it holds, especially if you hold the cornice in place for a minute or so. If there's paint on the surface just drive a clout in the wall under the cornice to support it for ten minutes or so, then pull them out and push a dob of cement in the hole before you wipe down.
    As I've said, you can't get a smooth finish with LN without having to attack the snots with a stanley knife, then going over it all again with gappo. And if you get any on the wall, you'll be cutting that out and patching it as well.

    I'm sure it probably looks a million bucks, but it's a lot more hassle doing it that way.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Broken Hill
    Posts
    107

    Default Hassle

    Aye John... the long way round...
    smooth it off
    hack it with a stanley after its dry
    No-Gap covering the gaps and gashes...
    Long as it looks good in the end...
    Daughter phoned us tonight (away up the property all weekend)
    Said "It looks great dad - thanks..."
    Considering I'm a woodie - that's a compliment..
    Jedo
    When all the world said I couldn't do it - they were right...

  11. #11
    Golden Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Morley WA
    Posts
    559

    Default

    Over the weekend I tested the use of silicon to stick cornice. Talk about bloody good. Just did a small test using a couple of off cuts, let the silicon set over night and then the next day tried to bust the joint and couldn't. The cornice broke instead.

  12. #12
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Jerrabomberra New South Wales
    Posts
    2

    Default Using Cornice Cement

    I've always used cornice cement without any problems. Other than the issues with using silicon and liquid nails already mentioned (gaps and mess etc); many people working at hardware stores are not qualified in any trade and aren't always the best people to get advice from.

    I use cornice cement and a dampened fence brush to finish off the cornice edges. This leaves a nice sharp line between the ceiling/wall and the cornce edge. Painting is also easier as cornice cement takes paint well.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Regional South Aust
    Posts
    257

    Default

    I would NOT recommend silicone as a glue for fixing cornice. It will inevitably squeeze out onto the paintwork / plasterboard and you will most certainly have adhesion problems with your painting..
    Leave the silicone for what it is intended for and that is deffinatly not fixing cornice !!!

    Cheers..


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 20th Aug 2010, 07:21 PM
  2. Nails required for 4.5mm cement sheet.
    By peter_sm in forum Plastering
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11th Mar 2008, 12:02 AM
  3. Tiling with liquid nails
    By presch in forum Tiling
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 5th Sep 2007, 09:34 AM
  4. Use of liquid nails to build deck
    By lopezjm2001 in forum Decking
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 3rd Jun 2006, 08:51 PM
  5. Liquid Nails vs Sikaflex, Bostik etc
    By vGolfer in forum General Odds & Sods
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 16th Jan 2006, 01:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •