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Electric sander for painting prep.

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  1. #1
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    Default Electric sander for painting prep.

    Hello all.

    I've started prepping my plasterboard interior for a fresh coat of paint. The previous owners painted the interior in very dark browns, a chocolate/deep purple etc feature wall in every room, and a mid-brown/coffee color on the other walls. I'm sick of the dark colours and want to go lighter, probably Hog Bristle full or half (very 2010, I know).

    I've just gone around the house with a torch, and I think I know why they went so dark. Every wall has significant imperfections, but practically the entire house looks like it once had one of those 6 inch wide horizontal wallpaper strips on it. There are two horizontal lines at about head height (probably the old glue edges) and all sorts of random plaster imperfections in between the two lines - looks like they had a half arsed attempt to patch it (where they tore the gyprock paper off I guess), did a poor job so they just painted it in dark colours to hide it for sale (yes, I'm the sucker). It's not obvious from a normal distance under normal light.

    It will show up with the lighter paint though so I need to fix it. Hand sanding it all back will take a long time and I'm not sure I have the patience.... I'm thinking an orbital sander will make the job quicker and easier - am I on the right track or should I be looking at something else?

  2. #2
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    Actually light paint can hide imperfections much better than dark paint. The lighter the better.

    Though I'm not sure that Hog Bristle is light enough for best results.

  3. #3
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    Ok thanks, thought it was the other way around, for no real reason. I'm considering half strength hog bristle which is fairly light, I'll try a coat of that after I do the basic prep work. Either full or half is a lot lighter than what is there now and the imperfections aren't that obvious - they certainly stand out when a torch is shone along the wall, but under normal light it's barely noticeable. Maybe I'm being too fussy.

  4. #4
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    Yes, the torch test is bound to show up imperfections on any wall!

  5. #5
    1K Club Member Random Username's Avatar
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    I have a cheap Ozito sander that I have relegated to plaster sanding duty as I don't like the idea of dragging plaster dust through a more expensive sander. It has a clip on style base (not velcro pad) which means it's possible to use the mesh sheet plasterboard sandpaper, which is a little bit more kind on the board's paper face than 60 grit sandpaper for plaster sanding.

    If you are using a vacuum cleaner, don't be surprised by getting static shocks off metal body/pipes as static builds up something fierce with plasterboard dust!

    There are specific plasterboard sanders available on ebay which might make the job more pleasant if you've got a number of rooms to do!
    DIY electrical house wiring details suitable for Australia - http://goo.gl/9d33T (PDF file)

  6. #6
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    Thanks Random. Good tip about being able to use mesh sheets.

    After having another look last night and a think about it, I really only need to sand off the high points in the glue/paint with an electric sander. Sanding the plaster filler back by hand isn't that difficult (just dusty).

    I'll buy a cheapie sander from the green shed and see how it goes.

  7. #7
    Paint Dealer Blocker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    Thanks Random. Good tip about being able to use mesh sheets.

    After having another look last night and a think about it, I really only need to sand off the high points in the glue/paint with an electric sander. Sanding the plaster filler back by hand isn't that difficult (just dusty).

    I'll buy a cheapie sander from the green shed and see how it goes.
    Tim,
    If you are left with numerous minor imperfections,I would suggest using a matt acrylic wall paint instead of low sheen.
    Regards,
    Blocker.

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