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Internal airless - Order of work- masking - backrolling

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  1. #1
    Member celestem's Avatar
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    Smile Internal airless - Order of work- masking - backrolling

    Hey
    I am planning to spray our renovation, three rooms (approx room sizes 5 x 5m, 5 x 8, 4 x 3) with an airless gun with a 517 tip. As I have never used one to spray indoors before, just outdoor single colour stuff, I was wondering what is the best order of work.

    I will enamel the mouldings with a foam roller before they are installed , leaving just the walls and ceilings to paint with the airless gun. Ceilings are paper faced gyprock and walls are hard set plaster.

    This goes against brush and roller methods, but I was thinking of painting the walls first. Here is my plan
    1. Sealer/undercoat the ceilings & back roll
    2. Seal/under coat the walls & back roll
    3. 2 x top coats on walls
    4. Mask wall off at bottom edge of cornice with blue mask and plastic and just letting it hang down (Otherwise if I do the ceiling before the walls, it seems more fiddly to mask upwards and have to stick the plastic in two places.)
    5. 2 x topcoats on ceiling

    In regard to masking, the other option I was thinking of was skip masking the cornice/wall join and to actually cut in a thin line along the the top of the wall by brush, and then after it has dried just use a 600x400mm thin plastic 'wobble' board and have a helper hold it in place where the cornice meets the wall, while I spray underneath or above it. This might save on fiddly masking. But I know from doing similar things and using a straight guide with a brush that it needs constant cleaning. But I have seen the outside of a house painted with no use of masking tape, just a 'wobble board' near the windows, and it turned out fine.
    To wobble board or not to wobble board at wall/cornice join - that is the question??

    As I have different sealer undercoats for the paper faced gyprock and hard set plaster walls, I thought it is best to keep them in the respective areas, so even when I am spraying the undercoats it seems like it should be masked between the ceiling and the wall as well, or shouldn't it matter if some paper faced gyprock sealer/undercoat gets on hard set plaster walls??

    With backrolling the sprayed paint, I was thinking that maybe only backroll the sealer binder to ensure good adhesion and penetration and then skip back rolling on the first top coat, but back roll the final 2nd coat.

    Has anyone used an airless indoors and can vouch for which is the best practise?
    Last edited by celestem; 29th Jul 2010 at 01:42 PM. Reason: Add detail

  2. #2
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    Hi again...
    I am not a fan of using the airless in doors and back rolling..
    In my experience (Better yet vast experience) bye the time you mask everything for spraying and then have to back roll as well it is quicker to to Just roll..
    There if far to much cleaning of rollers / spraying equipment to be doing both !!!

    Goodluck..

    P.S I am guessing you made a decision on which airless machine to purchase ??..
    Which machine did you end up running with ?..

  3. #3
    Member celestem's Avatar
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    Hi Strom
    Thanks for chipping in...
    I did a lot of reading and many people swear by airless spraying and how much time it saves. Though it becomes borderline if the rooms are furnished where absolutely everything needs to be covered or masked. In our case the rooms have no floor coverings yet, just concrete, and new walls and ceilings, so the only thing to mask is 4 windows and the ceiling/wall line.

    Will see how we go...

    When I came to buying a unit, I took on board your excellent advice about going for a diaphragm pump model and not the Graco piston ones with electronic brains, that you found susceptible to frying themselves. The model I bought was the Atomex GM-20E. There was an excellent deal going - $999, so I got a 450mm extension too and 313 tip for doors, plus extra filters.

    It should arrive next week - Woo hoo!

    I'll post an update when I get around to using it.

    If anyone else has a useful opinion feel free...

  4. #4
    Abh
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    My method is mask the windows, bench tops, pre finished surface and any glass then spray a sealer coat on the ceilings and back rolling get a wide roller on an extension pole and backroll like a madman then spray a sealer on the walls once again backroll then pole sand lightly all ceilings and walls spray 1 topcoat on the walls and backroll and then finish your ceilings and back roll. Then brush and roll the final coat of low sheen on the walls, I find this the best method for my self back back rolling helps so much. Make sure you give the ceilings and walls a good dust down and sweep the place out before starting dont forget a decent respirator with the correct filters. hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Member celestem's Avatar
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    Hi Abh

    Thanks for your post! Sorry if these look like dumb questions, but I don't do much painting and want to do a decent job, as am here long term.

    Quote Originally Posted by Abh View Post
    My method is mask the windows, bench tops, pre finished surface and any glass...
    What about the cornice/wall join? Don't you mask that? I didn't think that an airless gun would be that good for cutting in. ? Though I suppose for the sealer/undercoat it a bit of overspray would not be critical.

    Quote Originally Posted by Abh View Post
    backroll like a madman
    That's a good visual!
    Though I already a madman so it goes without saying!

    Quote Originally Posted by Abh View Post
    pole sand lightly all ceilings and walls spray
    Would about 220 grade we good for this or finer be better?
    I guess this is more like wiping rather than really sanding - true?

    Quote Originally Posted by Abh View Post
    1 topcoat on the walls and backroll and then finish your ceilings and back roll.
    This is the interesting bit...So one top coat on the walls, then finish the ceiling...But don't you get a lot of ceiling overspray on the walls? What did you protect the walls with or aren't you fussed about the small amount of atomised speckle at this stage because there is one final top coat for the walls to come?

    Quote Originally Posted by Abh View Post
    Make sure you give the ceilings and walls a good dust down and sweep the place out before starting dont forget a decent respirator with the correct filters. hope this helps.
    I have a very good compressor with about 15m of hose and a trigger nozzle. Is this good to dust down with or would a barely damp flat mop be best?
    Last edited by celestem; 3rd Aug 2010 at 02:57 PM. Reason: Extra detail

  6. #6
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    What is backrolling and why do you do it and what is pole sanding and why do you do it. I have a fair idea what it is all about but I would like to confirm it. Just in case I ma off track.

  7. #7
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    Back rolling is the process of rolling over the wet sprayed surface to achieve a roller finish for future touch up purposes. A pole sander is a screw on sanding block attached to a roller pole. Pole sanding is the method of sanding the ceilings and walls between coats to remove any grit that settles during the drying process.
    Some people back roll every coat including undercoat but I only back roll final coats.

  8. #8
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    Thanks "keepontruckin". Do you have to backroll at all.?

  9. #9
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    If you don't mind a spray finish and you are a pro with the airless and everything goes well then you don't have to back roll. You may over spray areas by acident and cause runs but I would just back roll the area where there are runs or heavy blotching has appeared. Then you would definatly have to back roll the final coats.

  10. #10
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    Ok so when backrolling do you still load up the roller or use it dry or just moistened with paint.
    I saw it somewhere on here the various usage rate but now cant find it. What is the various usage rates eg airless,rolling.

    Cheers

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