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Painting Oiled Timber

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  1. #1
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    Default Painting Oiled Timber

    We purchased some timber screens and oiled them ready to be put up, and now the other half has decided that she would like like them painted to match other areas of the house!My question is what preparation would I need to do to be able to paint over the oiled timber?Thanks Sabre

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SabreOne View Post
    We purchased some timber screens and oiled them ready to be put up, and now the other half has decided that she would like like them painted to match other areas of the house!My question is what preparation would I need to do to be able to paint over the oiled timber?
    Ah, I have the same problem -- but far more extensive. All my windows, door frames, etc, were oiled timber. On some of them, a professional painter just applied an acryllic undercoat and 2 acryllic topcoats (Dulux). Of course, it peeled off after a while. An exterior environment is inevitably unforgiving.

    So anyway, I'm doing the rest of it myself -- slowly. Here's the sequence I've progressively settled on (after several years of trial and error)...

    1) Sand back fairly heavily (unless your timber is very smooth to begin). The sandpaper will clog up very quickly. I ended up just buying large rolls of the stuff, and discarding the clogged pieces very frequently. I hope you don't have to do that -- it's a PITA.

    2) Clean thoroughly with turps. After drying, this might raise the timber fibres, making it feel rough. Re-sand with a higher grit if so.

    3) Prime with Penetrol (straight). This stuff has the advantage that it dries to all-solids -- it's not like a paint whose solvent must evaporate. So it penetrates as far as possible, and then dries solid. This minimizes the amount that the timber grain will rise again when you apply the paint.

    4) 2-3 coats of a slow-drying oil-based undercoat (e.g., Taubmans PrepRight traditional). For best results, allow each coat to dry for 2-3 days before the next.

    5) If the timber grain has raised, sand it again -- but only as much as necessary to re-smooth. Spot-prime any areas of timber that were exposed by the sanding (possibly after first wiping on a small amount of Penetrol first and allowing to dry). Re-apply 2 or more oil-based undercoats.

    6) Maybe apply more oil-based undercoats depending on whether any of the darker grain is still showing through the paint.

    7) Allow to cure thoroughly (at least a week).

    8) Sand very lightly and apply 3-4 acryllic top coats.

  3. #3
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    I had a timber door frame that refused to take any water based paint. It would just split and peel. So I just coated it with some oil based poly / estapol, allowed it to cure and then painted over with water based.

  4. #4
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    Bugger, sounds this could be a real PITA!

    What about using Zinsser?

  5. #5
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    If you want to paint over the oil stained finish, you will have to sand the surface then apply a coat of oil based sealer primer undercoat. Once the oil undercoat is dry (24 hours later) Lightly sand with a very light sand paper or I prefer a sanding pad. Dust off and apply your top coat/s being either waterbased or oil based top coats.

  6. #6
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Quote Originally Posted by keepontruckin View Post
    If you want to paint over the oil stained finish, you will have to sand the surface then apply a coat of oil based sealer primer undercoat. Once the oil undercoat is dry (24 hours later) Lightly sand with a very light sand paper or I prefer a sanding pad. Dust off and apply your top coat/s being either waterbased or oil based top coats.
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

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