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Painting weatherboards without sanding?

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  1. #1
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    Default Painting weatherboards without sanding?

    Hi All,

    About to paint my house and wanted to know if there's any paint or undercoat that can go directly over old paint on weatherboards? There's the odd area that's flaking which i'll sand back, but the majority of it is still good. So I'd like to get away without sanding the whole lot if I can.

    I was looking at the Dulux step 1 stuff and it says to just sugar soap the existing paint and paint over it. Would something like that be ok for the exterior of a house? Or are there any paints out there that'll go straight over old paint? I'll be using an airless sprayer if that makes any difference.

    Apologies if this has already been covered.

  2. #2
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Three rules of painting success: good prep, good prep & good prep. Applies especially to external timber such as your weatherboards. Regardless of what any paint manufacturer says you have to prep really well. That means - sanding. scraping all over. Now I've seen pressure washers do an OK job, but can be overkill as they will lift and remove even strongly adhered paint so I reckon for an occasional DIYer don't use them unless you want bare timber start. So sand, scrape so that you are sure that the existing paint is not about to come off.

    You need to spot prime/undercoat - the brand name self-priming exterior acrylics do work quite well so us the same type and colour for the prime coat and then the two or three finish coats. Three for sure if you are using the spray gun. I reckon a full gloss enamel style lasts longer and looks better longer too, but paint manufacturers mostly say there's no difference.

    Anyone that says only one coat is in business to sell paint (it's no coincidence that'd be paint makers . . . ) - even with good prep two coats will last longer than one and look better too. But I suppose if you don't count your own labour a re-coat in 5-6 years instead of 8-10 might be worth it . . . or if you plan on selling then it's someone else's problem!
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the feedback and advice.

    I wasn't talking about only doing one coat if that's what you thought when I mentioned the Dulux "step one" product. I intend on applying 3 top coats as well as spot priming areas that need it. I was just curious about the prep part, and if sanding every inch of weatherboard surface was necessary.

    I will be selling within 12 months (hopefully) so I'm not sure what to do still. What do the pro painters do? I just can't imagine they would bother sanding the whole lot.

  4. #4
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    Short answer is if you are going to sell soon, 'minimal' prep (e.g. a good sugar soap wash, a light sand and spot priming bare areas) will do the trick.

    Some friends got some "pros" in (many $x,000) to paint their exterior, and they pretty much just ran a 1/4 sheet orbital sander across the lot. Then on sunny dewey mornings bubbles would appear, and would disappear just as quickly before the painters could possibly arrive to inspect (of course!), so rather cleverly they marked the bubbles with a marking pen so they knew where to tell the pros to prep properly and repaint. In short, not all pros are pros...

  5. #5
    Old Chippy 6K
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    Quote Originally Posted by r3nov8or View Post
    Short answer is if you are going to sell soon, 'minimal' prep (e.g. a good sugar soap wash, a light sand and spot priming bare areas) will do the trick.
    I guess - it's not what I'd do . . .
    Advice from me on this forum is general and for guidance based on information given by the member posing the question. Not to be used in place of professional advice from people appropriately qualified in the relevant field. All structural work must be approved and constructed to the BCA or other relevant standards by suitably licensed persons. The person doing the work and reading my advice accepts responsibility for ensuring the work done accords with the applicable law.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloss View Post
    I guess - it's not what I'd do . . .
    With the quaility of paints these days I'm not sure a lot more prep is going to buy you many more years. And at the end of the day how will you really know?

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the help guys. I'll probably just stick with the minimal prep approach.

  8. #8
    China
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    Make sure you tell the new owner you did a lousy paint job

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    They will find out in a few years- as we did with our place, which was barely chalking when we moved in and 1.5 years on has lifted from the bottom coat and all has to be scraped back to bare wood. Painting the exterior is one of the maintenance items you expect with a timber dwelling, and it should last a good few years yet. I suspect most paint jobs on timber properties are 'lousy' ones

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Make sure you tell the new owner you did a lousy paint job
    Caveat emptor

    Many new owners will repaint anyway, if not straight away, within in a few years, where they are free to do their own lousy job or pay a 'pro' to a do a lousy job for them...

  11. #11
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    100% need to lightly sand (its realy not a big job) and dust down especially if your spaying. Spot prime any bare bits and 2 coats of a self priming exterior low sheen

  12. #12
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    Get a pressure washer, it'll remove a lot of the flaking paint with ease and you can sugar soap it with it aswell. It cuts back on some of the scraping. But be carefull you dont go overboard as it can also damage the timber, if used too close. Make sure its dry though before you paint. Then sand etc where required.

    Also Bunnings are trying to get rid of all their stock of Wattyl solagard (self priming) due to their war with Safeways, if you go to the right bunnings you might get a good deal on the paint. Ring a few stores. Dont hesitate as they are already diminishing stock or have.

  13. #13
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    Great info everyone, appreciate it.

    I do have a pressure washer already, so I could make use of that. I can't imagine it would save me much time though. Really, there isn't a lot of spots that are flaking. And I'm happy to tackle those with a scraper.

    I had another idea though. I'm fairly sure i've seen sandpaper on a foam backing somewhere, probably bunnies. So, what if I used one of those to do the sugarsoap with, which should scuff up the old paint enough for good adhesion. At the same time it's getting a wash. Thoughts?

  14. #14
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    [S]Ignore everything that Bloss advised in this thread and you will be fine.[/S].I don't think this is required, it's unnecessary and provocative.
    (Pressure washing external areas with sugar soap before painting is highly advisable before painting. If your pressure washer is a handyman version wich iam guessing it is you have no fear of it damaging your weatherboards, just be sure to allow to dry properly before painting)
    If the existing paint has already turned to chalk then it is not a "Simple paint job"..

    EDITED BY BEDFORD.

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