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Skirting and trim uneven finish

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  1. #1
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    Default Skirting and trim uneven finish

    Sorry if this has been answered before but I am painting windows and trims of a very old and neglected bungalow. There were numerous layers of paint and some chipped right to the bar timber, I sanded as smooth as possible without being obsessive compulsive and then undercoated in a 3 in 1 oil based primer, then two coats of enamel with 50mm brush and did not sand between each coats. Now looking at them I can see the different layers of paint and some imperfections (small dents etc) in certain light and angles so am thinking of a 3rd coat but before was thinking to use a filler to try and get a smoother finish before I paint . I used no more gaps on one section but was wondering if there is a tip from the pros regarding this type of issue? I was thinking maybe a joint compound so I could lightly sand but then would I need the undercoat again before doing the final coat? Just wondering what people do when it isn't possible to get perfectly smooth base if there is a way to get a better result. Not that it is bad and realistically the house is 90 years old so has many bumps and scrapes but like I said just want to know I am doing the best possible finish I can do....haha maybe I am obsessive compulsive after all!! Thanks for any advice tips...

  2. #2
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    It is possible to get a smooth base but it always depends on how much time and hard work you are willing to put in. Patience, preparation and good paint is the key to a great finish.

    1. Start off by scraping and sanding the surfaces removing the flaking paint and sheen. This will help with the paint bonding to the surface.

    2. Before undercoating the surface, dust down and wipe surface with a suitable cleaner. I use turps. Dampen the rag with turps and wipe the surface down. Use a dry rag to secondary wipe the surface down. Allow about 5 minutes to dry then apply the oil undercoat.

    3. Allow 24 hours to dry then apply an appropriate filler. Sand filler smooth and then spot prime the surface with the oil undercoat or I recommend undercoating the complete surface again. (A tip is to tint the undercoat to the top coat colour so your top oil coat covers in one coat.)

    4. After allowing 24 for the undercoat to dry, lightly sand surface with a light grit paper such as a 180 grit or 240 grit paper or sanding pad. Basically this is to remove any bugs or dust that has landed on the surface during the drying period. Dust down and clean again with turps rag and dry rag.

    5. Apply the top coat of Oil Based Enamel laying off the paint to allow for a smooth finish. Allow to dry for 24 hours. If the paint is transparent, allow 24-48 hours for the top coat to dry, lightly sand again clean then apply a second coat. It is important to allow enough drying time for the top coat as it may appear dry on the surface, but may still be wet bellow. Applying the second coat too soon can cause the paint to crack leaving a crocodile skin.

    Hope this information helps. Good luck

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by keepontruckin View Post
    It is possible to get a smooth base but it always depends on how much time and hard work you are willing to put in. Patience, preparation and good paint is the key to a great finish.

    1. Start off by scraping and sanding the surfaces removing the flaking paint and sheen. This will help with the paint bonding to the surface.

    2. Before undercoating the surface, dust down and wipe surface with a suitable cleaner. I use turps. Dampen the rag with turps and wipe the surface down. Use a dry rag to secondary wipe the surface down. Allow about 5 minutes to dry then apply the oil undercoat.

    3. Allow 24 hours to dry then apply an appropriate filler. Sand filler smooth and then spot prime the surface with the oil undercoat or I recommend undercoating the complete surface again. (A tip is to tint the undercoat to the top coat colour so your top oil coat covers in one coat.)

    4. After allowing 24 for the undercoat to dry, lightly sand surface with a light grit paper such as a 180 grit or 240 grit paper or sanding pad. Basically this is to remove any bugs or dust that has landed on the surface during the drying period. Dust down and clean again with turps rag and dry rag.

    5. Apply the top coat of Oil Based Enamel laying off the paint to allow for a smooth finish. Allow to dry for 24 hours. If the paint is transparent, allow 24-48 hours for the top coat to dry, lightly sand again clean then apply a second coat. It is important to allow enough drying time for the top coat as it may appear dry on the surface, but may still be wet bellow. Applying the second coat too soon can cause the paint to crack leaving a crocodile skin.

    Hope this information helps. Good luck
    Thanks for the Reply, the boards are really full of character meaning they have been painted numerous times or there are bumps scratches etc all over them, I can get them pretty smooth but not like new timber.. So what filler do you use and is no more gaps the best when you ultimately find an imperfection after the first top coat is already done? I understand that I could sand back to bare timber but I would like to finish this in my lifetime and wonder what a pro would do to save time but still do the best finish possible...thanks for any input

    Rob

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reno8ter View Post
    Thanks for the Reply, the boards are really full of character meaning they have been painted numerous times or there are bumps scratches etc all over them, I can get them pretty smooth but not like new timber.. So what filler do you use and is no more gaps the best when you ultimately find an imperfection after the first top coat is already done? I understand that I could sand back to bare timber but I would like to finish this in my lifetime and wonder what a pro would do to save time but still do the best finish possible...thanks for any input

    Rob
    Hi Rob

    Definately dont go any where near the timber with no more gaps....This product is not made to sand.

    If the paintwork is poor its best to get a heat gun and scraper to get back to the bare timber then you would sand it smooth.

    If you dont want to use a heat gun or completely remove the work you have completed it would be best to give it a sand then to apply a smooth skim coat of 2 pack filler such as builders bog. Try to keep these skim coats of filler smooth ( dont overfill) so to keep the sanding to a minimum. Apply serveral coats if needed, gradually building to a smooth surface. The product goes hard quickly..depending how much hardener you mix in so its easy to use several thin coats. Sand smooth, then undercoat and re enamel.

    Good Luck.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotthas View Post
    Hi Rob

    Definately dont go any where near the timber with no more gaps....This product is not made to sand.

    If the paintwork is poor its best to get a heat gun and scraper to get back to the bare timber then you would sand it smooth.

    If you dont want to use a heat gun or completely remove the work you have completed it would be best to give it a sand then to apply a smooth skim coat of 2 pack filler such as builders bog. Try to keep these skim coats of filler smooth ( dont overfill) so to keep the sanding to a minimum. Apply serveral coats if needed, gradually building to a smooth surface. The product goes hard quickly..depending how much hardener you mix in so its easy to use several thin coats. Sand smooth, then undercoat and re enamel.

    Good Luck.
    Thanks for that...I have been using no more gaps to fill any imperfections on the walls between first and second coat and was told by a mate who paints for a living it is better than filler as it doesn't need to be under coated and can be painted over 30 mins later which is a bonus. On the skirts and architraves they were very poor and have sanded for hours but they still have slight marks, imperfections which don't show up until the enamel is on, so using builders bog, I assume I would then need to undercoat again before the final? Also could I just use cornice adhesive as it dries quickly and could be undercoated the same day...as you can see I am trying to speed the process up but don't want to do a substandard job....I am pretty pedantic and to sand back to bare timber would take forever as there are skirts, architraves, picture rails which are intricate etc etc....so my question is if I should use a builders bog, or if I can use cornice adhesive/generic filler do I need to under coat? Thanks, my mate thinks I am being really over the top and maybe he is right an old house won't be perfect and it adds character? Like I asked I was wondering what a professional painter would do in our house with multiple layers and scratched, dented skirts and if I can get close to that I would be happy. Thank for any input

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reno8ter View Post
    On the skirts and architraves they were very poor and have sanded for hours but they still have slight marks, imperfections which don't show up until the enamel is on, so using builders bog, I assume I would then need to undercoat again before the final?
    Yes, possibly more than once if you want a high quality job. Also note that polyester resins like builders bog tend to set very quickly -- you only have a few minutes of working time. So if you're doing a lot of tedious filling you'll probably waste lots of bog. And if you let it reach the point where it's starting to set, you might find later that it hasn't adhered properly.

    An alternative is Zinsser ReadyPatch. Sand heavily first, then apply oil-based undercoat. When thoroughly dry, apply the ReadyPatch over the bad surfaces with a spatula or whatever. Allow to dry thoroughly. (Although it's touch dry within an hour or so, you should leave it until at least the next day, or longer, to ensure it has bonded sufficiently with the underlying surface.) Then you can sand again (with a cork block!), undercoat again, and so on...

    Also could I just use cornice adhesive
    IIRC, it's really hard to sand, so you might want to do a test first...

    [...] I am being really over the top
    I have the same attitude to my own place. Don't listen to people who try to convince you that a crummy job is somehow better. You're the one who must live with, and look at, the result every day. You'll never regret the time invested in creating a fantastic result.

    what a professional painter would do in our house with multiple layers and scratched, dented skirts
    They'd charge you a large amount of money until your bank account gets too sick and you decide reluctantly to accept a much crummier job...

    If you can master the relevant basket of techniques, and know how to learn from your mistakes without becoming frustrated and giving up, you're better off doing it yourself.

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