Hire the best Painter

weatherboard paint prep

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    mt gambier, sa
    Posts
    2

    Default weatherboard paint prep

    Hi, i am in the throws of preparing to paint my weatherboard house. It is in pretty good condition but definitely needs a lift. What i need help with is how to remove the paint that is currently on it (haven't tested for lead as yet), and what is best to use to remove. I have been told a heat gun would be quickest but not real sure on that!! Any help greatly appreciated.
    Cheers............Pauline


    PS: I am hoping to get started and done before winter hits!!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    109

    Default

    If the weatherboards aren't too bad use a orbital sander to scuff the suface. If the paint is flaking off everywhere, use a belt sander. If there are bubbles in the paintwork, then I would recommend removing the paint with a heat gun.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cairns
    Posts
    146

    Default

    We're planning the same in the next year or two. Our local house painter said we should use a heat gun for the bad stuff. There are several posts on this site that go into a bit of detail on this job, especially with regards to using heat guns on cladding. Our weatherboard is round form with 50 years of paint layers and sanding it off would take an eternity.

    cheers
    Brett

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Regional South Aust
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Heat gun on timber Weatherboard is playing Russian Roulette !!!
    This topic has been debated many times..

    I-Strip offers a unique and affordable paint removal system for lead based paints.

    Or alternatively if you intend doing large areas..

    Peelaway Australia

    I have no affiliation with either product !!!

    Goodluck...

  5. #5
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    mt gambier, sa
    Posts
    2

    Default

    thanks so much to all of the above for advice. I did hear that heat guns not a good idea!!! Will let you all know how my mission turns out and what path i took to get there.

    Cheers and happy Aussie Day!!

  6. #6
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Kyneton, VIC
    Posts
    18

    Default Re- HEAT GUNS for paint stripping

    FYI
    I spoke to a guy who used to restore for the National Trust and he recommended a heat gun for thick paint layers. Elsewhere on the web I read that if removing lead paint then heat guns must have temperature control to keep the softened paint below the vapourising point of the lead oxide. However, it's much slower removing paint at lower temperature.

    Maybe that lower temperature would make it less likely to burn the timber as well? But slower.

    Cheers,
    Nick

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Regional South Aust
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gracehoper View Post
    FYI
    I spoke to a guy who used to restore for the National Trust and he recommended a heat gun for thick paint layers. Elsewhere on the web I read that if removing lead paint then heat guns must have temperature control to keep the softened paint below the vapourising point of the lead oxide. However, it's much slower removing paint at lower temperature.

    Maybe that lower temperature would make it less likely to burn the timber as well? But slower.

    Cheers,
    Nick
    Like I said Heat gun and Timber Weatherboard you are playing Russian Roulette..
    Add to this Lead based paint and you now have two bullets in the chamber..


    As advised above there are much safer alternatives..

  8. #8
    1K Club Member jago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    ....
    Posts
    1,411

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Strom View Post
    Like I said Heat gun and Timber Weatherboard you are playing Russian Roulette..
    Add to this Lead based paint and you now have two bullets in the chamber..


    As advised above there are much safer alternatives..
    Strom where's you sense of fun theres nothing more fun than a bloody big blow torch nay flame thrower and painted timber ...I've set a few timbers alight interesting smells aswell, must have been the lead.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Regional South Aust
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jago View Post
    Strom where's you sense of fun theres nothing more fun than a bloody big blow torch nay flame thrower and painted timber ...I've set a few timbers alight interesting smells aswell, must have been the lead.

    Lol..
    Jago your a clown...

  10. #10
    2K Club Member barney118's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NSW
    Age
    51
    Posts
    2,369

    Default

    I used a heat gun slow and tedious. My paint was flakey and the heat helped it peel off. A quick sand too. If the paint is like a PVC it can be hard to burn off but its not much better clogging up sanding sheets. You are outside so any fumes with a mask should be ok.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Poolaijelo Vic
    Age
    62
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I have thought about how to prepare old rounded type weatherboards for repainting. What is needed in my opinion is a nylon type powered brush which will confirm to curves but not be too abrasive. My current method up til now has been replacing weatherboards with blue board for rendering when complete. Expensive compared to painting but from my understanding it should be a once only job. Also I can insulate walls as I go.

    Dean

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Poolaijelo Vic
    Age
    62
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Love that I-Strip. Based on web page pictures it even grows trees, lawn and rose bushes for you.

    Dean

  13. #13
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Unless the weatherboards are in diabolical condition, whatever happened to just washing down the weatherboards with paint-prep, scraping any loose and or flaking areas , putty any nails holes etc, light sand and paint?

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Poolaijelo Vic
    Age
    62
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxminder View Post
    Unless the weatherboards are in diabolical condition, whatever happened to just washing down the weatherboards with paint-prep, scraping any loose and or flaking areas , putty any nails holes etc, light sand and paint?
    Are you talking about the boards themselves in diabolical condition or the paint? I have never had anything to do with painting weatherboards myself so my experience was with just trying various methods of cleaning them up. The paint is very old. We have been here 10 years and paint was old when we moved in. I guess you could say that the paint was in diabolical condition in places. If you scrape it it just keeps peeling off so I guess it has lost it adhesion.

    I live in the country in a bushfire prone area and thought that blueboard would be better protection from fire. Also I am trying to make the property as low maintenance as I can.

    Dean

  15. #15
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD
    Posts
    1

    Default Heat gun and scraper is my choice!

    I'm in the process of repainting my house. The paint doesn't look to bad on my house. It isn't flaking off to bare boards, yet I didn't want to paint straight over it as it want a very neat finish. I've decided to remove the old paint, and I'm sure it has lead in it.

    I've tried just patch sanding it with a sander polisher with i think a 24 grit pad but I've decided to take it back to bare timber. It works best with either a heat gun or a gas torch.

    I found the gas torch a bit unsafe and hard to control the amount of heat on the timber etc. The heat gun works a great yet it does take some time. The results after painting are perfect.

    Mind you after I strip the paint of with the heat gun, I use a Ryobi, I sand it with the course grit, then again with a finer grit. You can see I've done the top of my house all ready: back to bare timber, sanded and painted.

    house-sanding-burning-2.jpg
    Below is the scrapper I find the best. Gets under the weatherboard as well.
    You can see in the photos above on the right of the window I've tried to sand off the old paint, and below it I became serious with the heat gun. It takes forever to sand and the dust is a pain. I'd rather not subject my neighbours to it. At least using the heat gun you can catch all the paint scrapings on drop sheets and dispose off.

    Just make sure you were the full dust and fume protection stuff.

    titaninp278.jpg122233d1258442082-3m-half-face-respirator-recommended-img_0967.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails house-sanding-burning.jpg  


Similar Threads

  1. Weatherboards and Lead paint. How to Prep?
    By snaza in forum Painting
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17th Nov 2010, 04:55 PM
  2. Paint Prep
    By Twisted Tenon in forum Painting
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 16th Oct 2010, 10:43 PM
  3. Paint prep over gloss enamel?
    By Cecile in forum Painting
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14th Jul 2010, 09:28 PM
  4. high pressure cleaner for paint prep?
    By montiee in forum Painting
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 15th Jan 2010, 09:41 AM
  5. Bubbles in paint on Weatherboard
    By interested16 in forum Painting
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 8th Apr 2009, 09:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •