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Backblocking questions

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  1. #1
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    Default Backblocking questions

    Hi Guys

    I have my plasterboard arriving tomorrow and so have been doing some last minute reading up on plastering techniques. I came across a great reference from Gyprock Gyprock : Installation Manuals - Residential Installation Guide.

    In that manual it suggests to make butt joins in between joists and to bend the boards up slightly then set them in place with a back block and back blocking cement to create a slight depression in the join. Is this the normal way to create butt joins, and should this technique also be applied to butt joins in walls.

    Thanks
    Mike

  2. #2
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    There are other ways. But this is a very good way.
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT


  3. #3
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    Hi Rod

    Thanks for the reply. Would you recommend Rondo B005 metal channel to create depression in the butt join or just using battons and a small packing piece underneath the join. I'm working with 600mm joist centres.

    Also do you have any tipps on how to back block a join where there is no access from behind the board - such as where the roof comes down to meet the walls and there is very little room to work above the ceiling, and also on plastered walls.

    Regards
    Mike

  4. #4
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    Default

    Hi Mike,
    I reckon battons and packing are the way to go - cheap and efficient.
    Backblocking on hard-to-get-to places is usually done as you go - cut all your sheets and backblocks ready to go, put first sheet on, go mix your cornice cement or masonry adhesive pretty sloppy, use an 8-10mm toothed trowel to put it onto the backblock, stick backblocks onto the already fixed sheet and fix the next sheet on.
    Gotta be done quickly though, otherwise the adhesive will not stick on properly.
    But how come you have to have butt joints on such places? Can't you re-arrange sheets so that butt joints come to more accesible areas?
    Cheers

  5. #5
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    If I use the batten method I just crimp the ends of a 400mm long batten off cut. With 2 screws it will give you the same effect.

    Cheers Rod
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT


  6. #6
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    wixxer

    But how come you have to have butt joints on such places? Can't you re-arrange sheets so that butt joints come to more accesible areas?
    I'm referring here to backblocking over the tapered joins where they run to the wall edges where the roof space gets too low to work in. I'll plan to make the but joins in more accessible places.

    Rod Dyson
    If I use the batten method I just crimp the ends of a 400mm long batten off cut. With 2 screws it will give you the same effect.
    I dont understand the above, could you please explain in more detail.

    Thanks
    Mike

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by HandyDaddy View Post

    I dont understand the above, could you please explain in more detail.


    Thanks
    Mike
    We are refering here to cleats used to fix butt joins between joists rather than the usual back blocking method. The Rondo B005 is used to screw up the butt joins and create a depression that you trowel flat.

    The same result can be achieved by cutting an 400mm length of batten and crimping the end so when these are screwed at right angles to the butt joint the center of the butt joint is pulled up, which creates the depression the can be troweled flat. You can use pliers or your snips to put a crimp in each end of the short length of batten.

    When you screw the cleat on the first sheet you start with a screw about 100mm from the end of the sheet then put a screw in 25mm from the end. These are placed across the join about 250 mm apart. When the second sheet is put up start with a screw 25mm from the end then the screw at 100mm.

    A good tip here is to just nip the screws up tight but not counter sunk into the sheet. This will prevent the screws pulling through when applying pressure on the other screws. Then just go back and nip them up tighter to sink the heads below the surface of the sheet.

    Cheers Rod
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT


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