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Do you stagger the butt-joins when hanging a ceiling?

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  1. #1
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    Default Do you stagger the butt-joins when hanging a ceiling?

    ?

    say in the first row I hang a 3m, 2.4 and a 2.4
    then the next row I hang a 2.4, 2.4 and a 3m.
    so that the buttjoins are all staggered rather than in one straight line.

    Is this the way to go ?

  2. #2
    Alien in a Strange Land Honorary Bloke's Avatar
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    Yes.
    Cheers,

    Bob

    "The population of Sydney was divided into two classes, those who sold rum and those who drank it."
    --Dr George Macakness (1806)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Honorary Bloke View Post
    Yes.
    thanking you

    do you think 300mm will be enough of a stagger?

  4. #4
    That's SIR!!......Not CUR Ivan in Oz's Avatar
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    Wouldn't it be a 600mm Stagger?
    You 'could' cut a 3000 or 2400 in half for the 2nd Row.

    Just thinking aloud.
    Navvi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivan in Oz View Post
    Wouldn't it be a 600mm Stagger?
    You 'could' cut a 3000 or 2400 in half for the 2nd Row.

    Just thinking aloud.
    Thats a good idea about halving a sheet for the 2nd row..

    The celilngs up now though -It actually worked out to be a 500mm stagger - That just happened to be where the battens were. So I cut the sheets to suit the battens, so the buttjoins all ended on a batten.

    I wouldve loved someone experienced to show me the perfect way to do it, but I think its turned out alright.

  6. #6
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    What you have done should be ok if the joins are trowelled up properly and taped with paper tape only.

    The further apart the butt joins are the better.

    It is also better to have a "floating" butt join between the battens. Which are back blocked and pinned using cleats over the join from batten to batten (about4), then a spacer between the cleat and the join to force the sheet up slightly.

    Cheers Rod
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod@plasterbrok View Post

    It is also better to have a "floating" butt join between the battens. Which are back blocked and pinned using cleats over the join from batten to batten (about4), then a spacer between the cleat and the join to force the sheet up slightly.

    Cheers Rod
    Is there anywhere I can see pictures or furthur explanation of this process, Rod ?

    ie. what is back blocking? and what do the cleats look like and how are they attached etc.

  8. #8
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    Darren I dont have a drawing or photos on my web site, its something I must get arround to.

    Back blocking is a strip of plaster about 300mm wide that is laminated to the back of the sheet covering the join. Either back blocking cement or cornice adhesive is best used for back blocking although any setting plaster will do.

    A cleat is a temporary strap that is fixed from truss to truss spanning the floating butt join. A packer is then inserted between the cleat and the join to cause the join to be pushed up creating a hollow that when taped and trowell properly will allow the butt join to be flat with the rest of the ceiling. The cleats are removed after 24hrs which allows the back blocking cement to set and dry. Leaving the join in that position.

    A 200mm strip of plaster board 700mm long can be used for a cleat. Cut one side of the strip length ways and fold to a right angle. Place it across the join and screw or nail it to the truss on each side. This works very well.

    Cheers Rod
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