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G'Day, Question about Frameless Bulkheads

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  1. #1
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    Default G'Day, Question about Frameless Bulkheads

    G'day all, I've signed up to the forums because I've seen Rod's how2plaster web-site and wanted to ask a couple of questions about the Frameless bulkheads, which I hope someone might be able to answer.

    I'm not sure I want to tackle this job myself necessarily, but I like understanding the how-to even if I end up getting a tradie to do the work for me.

    Basically I would like to put some bulkheads in place in our main living area as part of making it easier to fit a home-theatre projector (one bulkhead) and a drop-down projector screen (another bulkhead).

    I'm not sure the frameless bulkhead approach is even appropriate given I want to place something "inside" the bulkhead (projector, screen) but it's still a good starting place to learn from.

    So, onto my questions, apologies for the long post:

    1. My house is double-storey, bulkheads going downstairs, so the ceiling joists are basically [also] the upstairs floor joists. My ceiling joists run parallel to the bulkhead. Does this mean I'll have to install noggings between two joists every 900mm or so to support the ceiling track (that the vertical face of the bulkhead will hang from)?

    2. In the pictures (eg. pic 5 in the sequence) it shows a strip of track that has been attached to the wall plate. Do you cut-and-fold the track or use some kind of L-shaped angle bracket accessory here?

    3. I need to cut out a little "porthole" in the plaster for where the projector will shine through. Can't leave the rough edge of the plaster, so is this where I use some of the Rondo metal trims to cover the cut-edge of the plaster? There seems to be ones that you just clip on (or press-fit on) and ones where you seem to have to stop over them.

    3a. Actually I'm not even sure if the porthole will be through plaster because I also need a way to get access to the projector itself, and the only way is from the front (vertical face) of the bulkhead. Any ideas of the best way to do this because I want to maintain a flat vertical face on the bulkhead and the minimal possible "gap" if there is an access door. Basically I want the access door to be as invisible as possible.

    4. I need an open space within the projector bulkhead of around 600 wide by 500 deep by 250 high to house the projector within. The frameless bulkhead idea seems to be more about achieving a required look than providing any structural substance (other than necessary to support the plaster) so in my case am I better off pre-building an enclosure (eg. Melamine MDF) and physically attach that to eg. underneath floor joists, and build the bulkhead around that? Or perhaps even forget the whole frameless idea and put more structural framing in place (though I'm guessing steel will still make it easier to get perfectly straight?)

    5. The screen (in the other bulkhead) resides in a substantial box about 2200 long, 200-250 wide, and 200 deep roughly. And it's heavy. That's okay as these things usually aren't fixed to the ceiling plaster (they tend to use turnbuckles or chains hung from a ceiling joist and adjusted so the bottom of the box is level with the ceiling). The two issues I see here are that the length of the box means the required bottom trimmers can't be installed for the frameless bulkhead, and also that the opening cut into the plaster means the sheet will "sag" in that region due to lack of support. Again, perhaps the frameless approach isn't appropriate here, so any ideas gratefully accepted.

    Thanks guys

    Kevin

  2. #2
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    G'day all, I've signed up to the forums because I've seen Rod's how2plaster web-site and wanted to ask a couple of questions about the Frameless bulkheads, which I hope someone might be able to answer.
    We will give it a try.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    1. My house is double-storey, bulkheads going downstairs, so the ceiling joists are basically [also] the upstairs floor joists. My ceiling joists run parallel to the bulkhead. Does this mean I'll have to install noggings between two joists every 900mm or so to support the ceiling track (that the vertical face of the bulkhead will hang from)?
    Yes you would have to do this even if you fully framed the bulkhead.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    2. In the pictures (eg. pic 5 in the sequence) it shows a strip of track that has been attached to the wall plate. Do you cut-and-fold the track or use some kind of L-shaped angle bracket accessory here?
    The trimmer in this case is only to straghten the vertical face of the bulkhead, I used a small off cut of track fixed to the timber and then put the trimmer in place secured it to the wall side and adjusted the vertical face to my stringline and secured the bulkhead side. In this example the builder put the timber around the wall and along the ceiling, Normally I would have used a track in lieu of the timber, negating the need for the small bit of track used in this example.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    3. I need to cut out a little "porthole" in the plaster for where the projector will shine through. Can't leave the rough edge of the plaster, so is this where I use some of the Rondo metal trims to cover the cut-edge of the plaster? There seems to be ones that you just clip on (or press-fit on) and ones where you seem to have to stop over them.
    One is a casing bead (ugly) and the other is a stopping bead (similar to a casing bead in profile). Or better still you can use a stopping angle which is easier to install IMO. this has the profile of an arch bead but you can get them with a 6mm 10mm 13mm 16mm ........... 120mm, leg You would use a 10mm legged stopping angle or 10mm stopping bead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    3a. Actually I'm not even sure if the porthole will be through plaster because I also need a way to get access to the projector itself, and the only way is from the front (vertical face) of the bulkhead. Any ideas of the best way to do this because I want to maintain a flat vertical face on the bulkhead and the minimal possible "gap" if there is an access door. Basically I want the access door to be as invisible as possible.
    You can get access panels that are touch lock and set bead, set bead means they are flush finished with the plasterboard, they come in various sizes and you can get them made to order for a specific size. These would be better installed in the ceiling rather than the bulkhead face. You would only need the min size to service the projector.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    4. I need an open space within the projector bulkhead of around 600 wide by 500 deep by 250 high to house the projector within. The frameless bulkhead idea seems to be more about achieving a required look than providing any structural substance (other than necessary to support the plaster) so in my case am I better off pre-building an enclosure (eg. Melamine MDF) and physically attach that to eg. underneath floor joists, and build the bulkhead around that? Or perhaps even forget the whole frameless idea and put more structural framing in place (though I'm guessing steel will still make it easier to get perfectly straight?)
    I would fully frame up and plaster the the frame with the access panel in the ceiling. Either metal or timber will do the job. We use metal for the speed of assembly and material cost. This is not neccessarly the best reasons to deceide your material type. If you are doing it yourself you may be better working with timber.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevmeister View Post
    5. The screen (in the other bulkhead) resides in a substantial box about 2200 long, 200-250 wide, and 200 deep roughly. And it's heavy. That's okay as these things usually aren't fixed to the ceiling plaster (they tend to use turnbuckles or chains hung from a ceiling joist and adjusted so the bottom of the box is level with the ceiling). The two issues I see here are that the length of the box means the required bottom trimmers can't be installed for the frameless bulkhead, and also that the opening cut into the plaster means the sheet will "sag" in that region due to lack of support. Again, perhaps the frameless approach isn't appropriate here, so any ideas gratefully accepted.
    You will have to provide support for the plasterboard here. Again I would use metal studs and track to do this but you may find it easier to work with timber.

    Cheers Rod
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT


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