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Help with partially collapsed gyprock bulkhead

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  1. #1
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    Default Help with partially collapsed gyprock bulkhead

    During one of the recent storms a lot of water got into the bulkhead downstairs and caused it to come apart and collapse in one section. I have propped it up to dry but looking for some advice as to how I might secure it. The bottom sheet was glued to metal furring channels using what appears to be a (red) stud adhesive. The sheets were also mitred on the edge and stuck together with some more adhesive.

    I was wondering what the best product might be to stick the bottom sheet to the furring channel and also the sheets together. I am thinking either Liquid Nails or Sikaflex. I am thinking that I may need to screw the bottom sheet into the furring channels with self drilling screws to hold it up while the adhesive sets. Is there a particular type of screw for this purpose.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bulkhead-002.jpg   bulkhead1.jpg   bulkhead-003.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Default Glue

    A small tub of stud adhesive would do the job with some standard plasterboard screws. The trick is to practice with the screws so that you get just the right degree of penetration. You dont want to imbed the screw head through the paper. Also dont screw through the wet glue. Have you considered replacing that whole section of damaged plaster board? The difficulty is that it is not straight and even though you have done a good job of propping it up, you still need to bend it back down to apply some fresh glue. I assume that you have rectified the source of the leak first.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hey thanks. Would the standard plasterboard screws self drill into the metal furring channels.

    I did think about cutting it out and replacing it. I thought there would be a bit of work in achieving a smooth transition between the existing and replacement sections and fair bit of sanding. Before going to that extent I though I would try putting it back together and see if if I can get a good enough finish. If not I will cut it out and replace.

    cheers

  4. #4
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    Default Sanding

    You would have to do a fair bit of sanding whatever way you tackled this job. Repair or replace is the decision that you face. You will be looking up at the repair from your bed for a long time. Wet plasterboard tends to sag.
    Assuming your isurance does not cover this damage?
    It is hard to tell but it seems like in pic 2 that the Rondo clip has become detatched from the furring channel. You can clip his up with hand pressure.
    Standard plasterboard screws will drill into the center of the furring chanel but mark these first so that you are drilling into the center rather on the more substantial edges.
    You have located and fixed the water leak of course!

  5. #5
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    Default

    Much better to replace the board. When water soaks into plasterboard it is basically stuffed. The board gets very heavy and sags as above photos. Its not a big job to fix judging by the photos and a tradie should do it fairly cheaply, especially if you offer to sand it, which wouldnt take long to do.

    cheers

  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by REBSS View Post
    Much better to replace the board. When water soaks into plasterboard it is basically stuffed. The board gets very heavy and sags as above photos. Its not a big job to fix judging by the photos and a tradie should do it fairly cheaply, especially if you offer to sand it, which wouldnt take long to do.

    cheers
    Several things here. Plasterboard when wet will sag and when it dries will stay in sagged state. However if propped it will dry back flat no problem. It can also be dampened and then propped to re- shape it flat.

    Next, this is prefabricated bulkhead, where the back of the sheet is routered out to the face liner board, then bent to 90 deg. then taped or glued along the back to hold it together. This may have been factory made or made on site. The idea is to eliminate the need of external angles saving on stopping up.

    So the fix for this job is pretty simple. Screw the sheets back to the furring channels, (no need for glue) just screw the edge and double screw the center. Then use an external angle to finish it off.

    cheers
    GREAT PLASTERING TIPS AT



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