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Damp under tiles

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  1. #1
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    Default Damp under tiles

    Hi All, Iíve been lifting floor tiles and have found some damp patches just in one area. (Damp to the extent that there is water pooling in the old tile glue.) Iím pretty sure itís not coming down a wall as itís dry next to the wall. Pretty sure itís not coming in from outside as although itís close to the patio, the patio is dry. Only thing I can think of is itís seeping up through the slab. Is this possible? Weíve had a lot of rain here on the Sunshine Coast this year. If itís seepage, what do I do about it?
    Cheers, Pete

  2. #2
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    Not enough information, if it’s a bathroom where this is occurring then it may be the shower, kitchen or laundry could be other taps or waste.
    You mention it’s dry next to the wall and I assume you refer to an exterior wall but what about the other walls including interior.
    A concrete slab is not waterproof by itself, assuming it is ground level rather than a multi story setup there should be a vapour barrier under the slab. Of course with people converting old areas into habitable space eg garage conversion, sometimes the slabs were poured without a barrier.

    You really need to chase it all directions to find its extent, that will tell you where it is not coming from.

  3. #3
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    It's usually referred to as rising damp and yes it is rather wet here at the moment
    The fact it is pooling makes it even worse.
    Need to know the lay of the land to address seepage problems
    What type of construction
    i.e Are you on a slope
    Is the home cut into the land
    How old is the home as in could there possibly be water services poured into the slab circa 1970's-1980's

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys. The room is a lounge room and not adjoining a bathroom, laundry or kitchen. Its a single level slab house built on a very flat block in the early 90s. The patch is about 4ft long and 6Ē wide. It is close to a door to outside but there is a thin dry area ( a couple of inches) between the damp patch and the door. The area outside the door is dry. Iíve now raised all the tiles in the (very large) room and there are no other damp areas.

  5. #5
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    It'd be more than coming from the patio doorway, capillary action of a horizontal crack between the tile bed and the slab, from a rain event.
    inter

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by vicpete1 View Post
    Thanks guys. The room is a lounge room and not adjoining a bathroom, laundry or kitchen. Its a single level slab house built on a very flat block in the early 90s. The patch is about 4ft long and 6” wide. It is close to a door to outside but there is a thin dry area ( a couple of inches) between the damp patch and the door. The area outside the door is dry. I’ve now raised all the tiles in the (very large) room and there are no other damp areas.
    Assuming you are going to grind the floor to remove the glue see what it is like once you have done that.
    You may have a spring under that particular spot.
    Anything is possible with water.
    Is there any possibility there are drains under that area.
    I have come across situations where water tracks along the drain trenches.

  7. #7
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    Inter, Iím beginning to think youíre right . It has dried this morning and looks like it was just on the surface, My theory is that hot humid air (which we had some extreme conditions of earlier in the year) is getting under the patio door. When said air hits the relatively cold slab condensation happens. Then your capillary action draws that moisture in. When not so humid the area immediately inside the door dries out. Iíll keep an eye on it for a few days before I proceed with anything.
    Thanks!

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