Hire the best Tiler

shower soap tray

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    393

    Default shower soap tray

    I will be installing a corner positioned ceramic soap dish in the shower. How do you hold it in position while the glue is setting?

    Having never done this, I was guessing the dish would tend to fall back off the wall as soon as I had taken my hand away, unless something holds it in position.

    I had been planning on letting the adjacent tiles (left, right, and below) set before attempting the soap dish, and then fitting the dish. I was considering using masking tape to keep it in place, maybe even wedging something underneath to take the weight of it while the glue sets. And only when dry would I carry on the tiling higher up the wall.

  2. #2
    1K Club Member Godzilla73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Legoland
    Posts
    1,291

    Default

    G'day,

    Yep, i've done exactly as you've described only i used duct tape...
    I had a life, but my job ate it...

  3. #3
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney North
    Posts
    9,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ErrolFlynn View Post
    I will be installing a corner positioned ceramic soap dish in the shower. How do you hold it in position while the glue is setting?

    Having never done this, I was guessing the dish would tend to fall back off the wall as soon as I had taken my hand away, unless something holds it in position.

    I had been planning on letting the adjacent tiles (left, right, and below) set before attempting the soap dish, and then fitting the dish. I was considering using masking tape to keep it in place, maybe even wedging something underneath to take the weight of it while the glue sets. And only when dry would I carry on the tiling higher up the wall.
    Masking tape is no good, it is too weak, go for a good quality cloth based gaffa tape, these have high grip.

  4. #4
    1K Club Member Godzilla73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Legoland
    Posts
    1,291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Metrix Building View Post
    Masking tape is no good, it is too weak, go for a good quality cloth based gaffa tape, these have high grip.
    I'm sure he mentioned using glue as well, not just masking tape...

    Tile glue has pretty good "grab", masking tape will be fine as long as the surrounding tiles are set...
    I had a life, but my job ate it...

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SE Melbourne
    Posts
    435

    Default

    If you have time fit the surrounding tiles first and let the adhesive go off. Then using your adhesive put the soap dish in place and hold it there with tape for about 24 hours (or until the adhesive holds). The type of tape is not real critical providing it sticks to the surface above.

  6. #6
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney North
    Posts
    9,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla73 View Post
    I'm sure he mentioned using glue as well, not just masking tape...
    LOL, I have seen one of these just held in by a bit of tape after it fell off and they didn't know how to put it back on, they used a red gaffa tape to match the pink tiles, as they could not find pink gaffa !!!

    They did comment they tried duct tape, and masking tape and Gaffa was all that held it up

  7. #7
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Qld
    Posts
    3,278

    Default

    It seems the old soap holder is now almost a thing of the past.

    Almost all the new homes now have a niche in the shower wall/s.

    I did a couple last week that had provision for LED lighting in the top of the box.

    Good luck.
    Growing old is compulsory, growing up is not.
    http://www.wet-seal.com.au/waterproofing/locations.html

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    393

    Default

    Just thought of something. Each of the two walls in the shower will be tiled. Each wall will then be grouted, except for the corner. The corner will not be grouted but sealed using silicon because I gather walls may move and it is standard practice to silicone them as it allows some tolerance if the walls move. However, I was planning on gluing the soap dish to both walls with the tile cement and grouting around it. This seems to be at odds with the notion of allowing for walls to move. Perhaps Iím missing something. What is the method of fixing corner shower soap dishes?

    Either the soap dish is glued to one wall only, which would seem like a precarious situation. Or I glue it to both walls and risk the soap dish cracking if the walls move. (Catch-22.)

  9. #9
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Melbourne south east
    Posts
    2,103

    Default

    Use sika for the soap dish if its across a corner. They use it on caravans and boats which are subject to constant movement.

  10. #10
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney North
    Posts
    9,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ErrolFlynn View Post
    Just thought of something. Each of the two walls in the shower will be tiled. Each wall will then be grouted, except for the corner. The corner will not be grouted but sealed using silicon because I gather walls may move and it is standard practice to silicone them as it allows some tolerance if the walls move. However, I was planning on gluing the soap dish to both walls with the tile cement and grouting around it. This seems to be at odds with the notion of allowing for walls to move. Perhaps Iím missing something. What is the method of fixing corner shower soap dishes?

    Either the soap dish is glued to one wall only, which would seem like a precarious situation. Or I glue it to both walls and risk the soap dish cracking if the walls move. (Catch-22.)

    It will be fine to glue it on both walls,
    I would suggest if you get enough movement in the walls to crack the soap dish then you have a much bigger problem to worry about
    Movement of bathroom walls might only be a fraction of a mm, to crack a soap dish you would have to move the walls about 5mm or more.

  11. #11
    1K Club Member Pulse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Port Macquarie
    Posts
    1,759

    Default

    These soap dishes are pretty dangerous, seen plenty break when fallen against and cause deep lacerations. I personally stick to metal ones

    Cheers
    Pulse

  12. #12
    Je pense, donc METRIX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney North
    Posts
    9,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pulse View Post
    These soap dishes are pretty dangerous, seen plenty break when fallen against and cause deep lacerations. I personally stick to metal ones

    Cheers
    Pulse

  13. #13
    China
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    876

    Default

    In the old days they used to come with a single screw hole underneath for fixing

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    393

    Default

    It's on!

    And remarkably easy to do so too. The glue does a remarkable job of 'sucking' that my additional support, various props may not have been required, but were used anyway. However, one thing that needs to be checked is drainage from the tray. I knew how much my walls sloped the wrong way in the way I have been cutting my tiles in the corner. So, when the soap tray was on and my tile spacers in place and getting ready to put the kettle on I got myself a glass of water and spoon and carefully spooned in a few tablespoons of water into the tray. With some dissappointment I saw the water accummulate toward the back of the tray. (No one likes soggy soap.) So, I applied some pressure to the lower end of the soap tray until the water began to drain toward the front. Unfortunately the tray now has a slight tilt, but hell, my walls have a slight tilt too. The only other thing I forgot, that an experienced tiler would have considered is the size of the tiles that are surrounding the tray. The corner of this shower has the cut tiles, with whole tiles everywhere else. This means that two tiles have cut outs to accommodate the tray. On one wall the cut out is about 25mm on the other wall the cut out is about 12mm. This worked, and was more of good luck than design or skill on my part. I wouldn't have liked to attempt to cut a tile narrower than 12mm cut out. It may not have looked particularly neat.

Similar Threads

  1. replacing shower tray
    By The_Fixer in forum Bathrooms
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10th Aug 2012, 04:17 PM
  2. waterproofing when using a shower tray
    By Stan 101 in forum Bathrooms
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 8th May 2012, 12:25 AM
  3. Shower tray, that can walk...
    By zeroseven in forum Bathrooms
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 15th Oct 2010, 07:56 AM
  4. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 18th Feb 2008, 05:18 PM
  5. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 18th Dec 2005, 01:03 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •