Hire the best Tiler

Tiling over existing horsehair plaster for bathroom

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6

    Default Tiling over existing horsehair plaster for bathroom

    Hi folks,

    I'm new to the forum but am reasonably handy when it comes to DIY.

    I plan to convert a bedroom in our circa 1960 house into a bathroom. It is lined with horsehair plaster in VGC (minimal if any movement and no signs of cracking etc). My query is, is it OK to tile directly over the painted plasterboard? I intend to waterproof the floor and coves, plus shower recess and splashbacks with Davco K10, and use the reinforcing matting, and I was going to rough sand the paint for the membrane and tile glue to better key into the wall. Additionally, for the shower recess the existing plaster will need to be removed to rough in the plumbing.

    So, I am hopefull to remove only what plaster is required for the rough-in, and then to patch with 10mm WR board (as it would be the same thickness as the existing plaster), rough sand all over and then waterproof where required before tiling.

    Normally for this sort of job, I would completely gut, straighten walls and reline with 6mm villaboard, however my wife is due in a couple of weeks with our second child, and I intend to suprise her by producing this new bathroom during the 4 days she will be in hospital. Before you all cry "it can't be done", I have teed up some help to hit it hard as soon as the labour starts, and the layout won't require any walls to be moved etc.

    In terms of straightening the walls, we'll achieve that on the run by varying the adhesive thickness...not ideal but will expediate the whole process and give us a fair chance of completing the task in the 4 day timeframe.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance folks for any input.

    Regards,

    Steve

  2. #2
    2K Club Member seriph1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Kilmore, near Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    63
    Posts
    2,238

    Default

    Welcome to the forum - you will find a wealth of info here and no shortage of opinion!



    You 'can' tile directly to your plaster but if you think about it (sorry to sound like an old school teacher) all you'll be tiling to is paint, so unless the paint adhesion is as good as tile adhesive you risk losing all your hard work over time.

    I would not be removing the plaster though if I could avoid it - having owned a home with fibrous plaster what I did was sheet over it. In the bathroom you could do the same, using the appropriate tile board. Then you know you've got a good mechanical anchor.

    The transition between tile and wall can be easily disguised using a tile cap or some similar decorative element.

    HAVE FUN!

    BTW pics of existing conditions and one or two of the exterior of the home really help folks to know how best to advise
    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here

  3. #3
    1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jindabyne
    Posts
    1,041

    Default

    My "two bob's worth" is I agree. By the time you muck around with the plaster surface it will be easier and quicker to put up new villaboard over the top. You can true this surface up quite easily then tiling is straight forward. For a quick job, you don't need any unexpected issues... so preparation, preparation, preparation then go like hell!


  4. #4
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks for the input fellas.

    I agree with the suggestion of sheeting over the existing plasterboard and truing up the walls to some extent. In doing this, I'm thinking to locate the studs and whack plenty of screws through the plaster, just to solidify what's there. I'm also thinking, perhaps 10mm WR board might be the go, simply as I can use plenty of screws in fixing this over. Normally I'd use villaboard, with stud adhesive direct to the studs and my coil nailer, but given the painted surface perhaps screws though new WR plaster might me better...from experience, screws don't sink very flush in villaboard.

    Any comments on WR board vs villaboard over the existing plaster?

    Thanks again guys.

    Cheers,

    Steve

  5. #5
    Hammer Head - 1K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    IMO villa is way to go, we just run a 10mm bit before screwing off.

    i only use Wet area plasterbaord for ceilings in bathrooms & walls on lundrys

  6. #6
    4K Club Member ringtail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    brisbane
    Posts
    8,266

    Default

    x 2 for villa.

    PS, keep that coil nailer in its box. Hand nailing is by far the best and normal gyprock nails work fine and set easily. Gal clouts work fine too but the risk of overdriving is too high with a gun IMHO

  7. #7
    Deactivated User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    N/A
    Posts
    296

    Default

    Be careful to make sure that the waterproofing with the K10 is properly cured. If you start tiling over it prior to proper curing - run the chance of re-emlsifying.

    I gave mine a couple of days to ensure that the corners and coves were properly cured - especially as these are the most critical areas where the membrane could possibly fail under stress through movement.

    Other area that could be a hold up - if waterproofing over the screed will need a few days depending on weather for the screed to dry properly prior to applying a membrane. I am conservative and allowed my last one at our house almost 2 weeks.......as I really do not want to be pulling it apart after putting the work in. Can be reduced I believe with some quick cure screeds from Ardex or the such, or using a pre made shower pan.

    Re bogging out of plum walls during tiling - realistically - you're definitely making life hard for yourself. If you have help with you - it could possibly be quicker and easier to remove the plaster, apply any extra studs for wall "straitening", and apply villaboard.

    A rushed job will show. An out of plumb job will show. A job where the waterproofing membrane fails will show later........

    Bathrooms require planning for proper execution. "6 P's "

    There are other ways to save time - possibly using compressed cement sheet on the correct grade to a shower channel with tiling lip - ie negates the need for screeding (as long as the channel can run between/parallel to the joists) - something like this Tile to Tile Lineal Drain Installation Guide | Creative Drain Solutions

    Moving house, divorce, job change, etc including new family member arrival are all up very high on the contributors to stress. If it was me - I would be to think very carefully about what you wish to achieve and the likeliness of achieving the desired outcome.... In addition to "how" to achieve what you are visualising.

    By the way - my Mrs was out of the hospital on day 3 after a caesarian for our second one - hospital too noisy and annoying for her......

    Cheers

  8. #8
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Thanks for the additional advice guys...I really appreciate it.

    Normally on bathrooms I do the full strip, straighten, reline with villa, screed, K10 and tile, as I like to do things once and once only. And part of me is embarrassed to have asked advice on hurrying my own bathroom, but as you guys have said, there wont be much difference in overall time if I strip and straighten first so that the tiles can then go on quickly...Thanks again guys, and I know I'm on a hiding to nothing to actually complete the bathroom, however I might get it close and have all the noisy stuff done.

    Now my next question is, what are the legalities of letting my 2 1/2 year old handle a sabresaw and circ saw?

    Cheers again,

    Steve

  9. #9
    Novice
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    29

    Default

    My rule of thumb: if they're taller than it, they can use it

  10. #10
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Haha, good rule! Although if my wife saw my 90cm son using my 70cm chainsaw, the said chainsaw might be used by said wife to shorten another part of me!

Similar Threads

  1. Tiling over existing tiles
    By stevew111 in forum Tiling
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14th Oct 2011, 10:38 AM
  2. Re-tiling bathroom, over solid plaster
    By scratch in forum Tiling
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 1st Apr 2011, 05:07 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 5th Apr 2010, 11:35 PM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 20th May 2008, 10:30 AM
  5. Tiling over existing tiles
    By Andy Mac in forum Tiling
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 8th Feb 2006, 03:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •