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Setting out a stringline where you only know the middle points.

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  1. #1
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    Default Setting out a stringline where you only know the middle points.

    I need to rebuild a fence that was knocked down by a storm last year.

    It was an old wooden pine fence that had 90x90 posts set in concrete.

    The old posts had rotted away, so now I have a dome of concrete where the posts were with a square hole in them. I've hammered in star pickets so I can remember where they were.

    At the same time as the fence falling over, my neighbour was doing some excavating. And now I have lost the corner post and the post hole second from the corner.

    Their fence also went over, so there is no way of telling where our corner boundary is.

    Here is a diagram:
    img_2783.jpg

    Is there a way to use the four post holes that I have to run my stringline and keep it straight - the intersecting point on the side fence will be my boundary?

    If I accidentally run it off at an angle it could intersect at the wrong point.

  2. #2
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    You've got enough points to get a straight line as long as they all line up. I would go with the string line then both you and your neighbor check your boundary dimensions against title and if you are both happy then box on.

    Tools

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    When you say "line up' do you mean by eye balling it? We've checked out Survey Plan but it isn't really helpful.

  4. #4
    4K Club Member ringtail's Avatar
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    Get it surveyed. It may cost you $1000 but splitting that cost with your neighbour is small fry compared to a boundary argument down the track.

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    +1

  6. #6
    1K Club Member Random Username's Avatar
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    Laser pointer in the evening? Clamp it to the third post back, align (allowing for offset) the beam with the next two posts, and then see where the beam ends up for the corner post.
    DIY electrical house wiring details suitable for Australia - http://goo.gl/9d33T (PDF file)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ringtail View Post
    Get it surveyed. It may cost you $1000 but splitting that cost with your neighbour is small fry compared to a boundary argument down the track.
    I looked into getting an Identification Survey, it was about $2,500, which is a bit more than I am willing to pay! I get along really well with my neighbour and for personal reasons I wouldn't hit them up for half (even if it was my right).

    I like the idea of the laser pointer... I was hoping there was some trick of the trade that I could use

  8. #8
    1K Club Member Spottiswoode's Avatar
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    start your string lie back a few holes where you know it is right (back along the solid line in your diagram), then you can line it up and continue forwards. Do that for both sides of the existing holes/fence then pick the middle. The laser pointer idea is similar to the string line but more techie

  9. #9
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    you should know your boundary dimensions.. cant you measure from your opposite side fence..

  10. #10
    4K Club Member ringtail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormwalker View Post
    I looked into getting an Identification Survey, it was about $2,500, which is a bit more than I am willing to pay! I get along really well with my neighbour and for personal reasons I wouldn't hit them up for half (even if it was my right).
    Fair enough but he may not be your neighbour forever. Fencing and boundary issues are the number one dispute between neighbours. The only way to get it right is by survey. It's a very small price to pay ( although it is a rip off).

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormwalker View Post
    I looked into getting an Identification Survey, it was about $2,500, which is a bit more than I am willing to pay! I get along really well with my neighbour and for personal reasons I wouldn't hit them up for half (even if it was my right).

    I like the idea of the laser pointer... I was hoping there was some trick of the trade that I could use
    It sounds like your surveyor is up selling something that you don't need. For a fence mm accuracy isn't needed because no matter what happens the fence will straddle the boundary line by up to the the thickness of the posts, rails etc. A simple slender stake with no accurately placed nail will do without the dept of lands searches.
    inter

  12. #12
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    I had a fence built between the backyard of two properties that had a fence dividing the first section of the blocks but never had one dividing the backyard. I got tired of the tenants and their dogs using my backyard, my jetty and driving their car through it.

    Informed the owner who consented to pay half the cost, only to receive a letter a week later that we had to do a survey to determine location of fence. No amount of reasoning that I was using a fencing contractor and that he would continue the fence line from the front half of the block would dissuade him from this.
    $1000 later we had a peg exactly where we knew it was going to be.

    Half way through the job, we got another letter stating that we had to stop all work and that the surveyor had to come and assess that the fence was being built where he put the peg.

    I called him and told him that if he wanted extra assessments he could pay for himself. Of course no one came.
    Dearest fence ever. Owner is a city lawyer.
    Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance
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  13. #13
    2K Club Member toooldforthis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tools View Post
    You've got enough points to get a straight line as long as they all line up. I would go with the string line then both you and your neighbor check your boundary dimensions against title and if you are both happy then box on.

    Tools



  14. #14
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    I've had several fences surveyed, they should range between about $500-900. That should pay for a plan and a guy to come out and put two pegs in the ground. Well worth it.

  15. #15
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    Thanks everyone, I've called to get a second quote - hopefully it's cheaper. It would be my preference to know exactly where the surveyed boundary is. But, if it's going to cost any more than $1k, I'll just wing it and err on the side of caution and build the fence a little closer in. The rear boundary is located above a retaining wall in what is mostly unusable space (other than a garden). It backs on to council owned land anyway which is scrub between my house and a motorway.

  16. #16
    3K Club Member johnc's Avatar
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    As a point of minor interest is we have had the situation of a neighbour doing building works who got in a surveyor which revealed that the fence was spot on at the footpath and a full metre out at the back fence, you just never know what you might find. Obviously this was sparked when someone found out that what should have been a square block wasn't when they went to set out a slab, it was though after we demolished the fence.

  17. #17
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    Here in the west you can "usually" find the pegs that mark the corners. That doesn't guarantee they are right, but getting a confirmation survey was cheaper for me than a whole new one...

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