Using hex head tek screws.

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  1. #1
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    Default Using hex head tek screws.

    What is the correct way to use tek screws for attaching zincalume to top hat for a fence? Some seem to go straight through but others take much longer, but I don't think my technique varies. I am using an old 1000W power drill.
    Is fast speed, slow speed preferable? A lot of pressure or minimal? I tried the hammer function but that just made a lot of noise.
    Sorry about the basic questions but it is difficult to find answers online.
    Janine

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    You using timber or metal screws.. If its pointy then it will be harder , you need self drilling screws.. Also cordless impact drivers are the best for roofing screws, or any screws for that matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    If its pointy then it will be harder , you need self tapping screws..
    Self tapping are pointy, self drilling tek for metal.
    http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/446422/f...=1427382383830

    Agree, invest in a battery combo drill/impact driver set.

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    gimme a break .. havent had my morning coffee yet.....fixed..

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    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    gimme a break .. havent had my morning coffee yet.....fixed..

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    AHHH.. thats better,.. also you can screw through the valley of the sheet and use much shorter screws as well. If you so desire.

  7. #7
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    Firm pressure is better as long as your not bending or damaging the sheet. Helps if there's good support behind it.

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    They are tek screws for metal. They have B8 on the head. The local metal centre sells them in bags of 100.
    I was watching some guys install a fence recently. One had a brand new cordless drill and the teks would go straight in. The other bloke was using a much older cordless and it took him much longer.
    Now I have to ask what is the difference between a drill, driver and hammer drill?

  9. #9
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapienreno View Post
    Now I have to ask what is the difference between a drill, driver and hammer drill?
    You need an impact driver which is not the same as a hammer drill, though they sound similar. A hammer drill simply turns with an up and down action. The impact driver imparts rotational force in a downward action.
    Once you have tried an impact driver there is no going back.

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    Helps if there's good support behind it.
    Top Hat rails don't seem to move much once secured to the posts. Zincalume fences are standard out here. Actually zincalume/colorbond houses are too- roof and walls

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    I have never, repeat, never used an impact drill/driver to install screws, just put some real pressure on them.
    If they are self drilling, then you have to keep the pressure on them until they cut through the sheet and top hat just like you would with a drill bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    I have never, repeat, never used an impact drill/driver to install screws...
    I was once re-roofing a carport and my tradie neighbour saw me using a standard drill driver, he brought over his impact driver. There was a measurable improvement in speed of my work. That's when I invested in a new cordless drill combo with impact driver

  13. #13
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    I was using firm and consistent pressure. Time taken to install screws varied a lot. Some seemed to take forever and I lost a few of them when the pressure I was using caused them to suddenly slip and shoot away. Others went straight in even though nothing had changed. I was starting to think some of the screws mustn't be as sharp.

    I replaced all the old nails on the roof with 'zips' and it was a much easier job than trying to install these tiny fencing screws.

    I am also going to see about magnetised drill bits for installing screws so I don't keep dropping them.

    I discovered the benefit of using soap on screws and nails when working inside the house. The 120 year old hardwood frames make installing gyprock and extra noggins etc really difficult. Don't tell me the soap will corrode the metal as it has been the only way anything will penetrate the wood. I can pre drill but it is still impossible to insert anything. The soap is miraculous, makes it easy.

    Janine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapienreno View Post
    I was using firm and consistent pressure. Time taken to install screws varied a lot. Some seemed to take forever and I lost a few of them when the pressure I was using caused them to suddenly slip and shoot away. Others went straight in even though nothing had changed. I was starting to think some of the screws mustn't be as sharp.
    Reminds me of when I first started using these with a standard power drill, pressure and getting no where. Now seems an easy thing to do, must be a knack you get somehow.... and eventually!

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    Impact driver is designed specifically for driving screws. Has variable speed and delivers a series of radial impact when the going goes harder, that is a rotating hammer and not an axial hit ... that is a series of downward blow as the hammer drill does to break concrete or bricks with a masonry drill. Sometimes you get a few dodgy screws in a bag. If it does not go in first try, discard the screw. Fencing screws need speed to drill the hole and firm pressure. if you use an ordinary drill it can be too slow. Sometimes the only way to place the screw where you want it is to pre-drill and use a longer screw.
    An impact driver is a must particularly if you get a good quality and very short variety.
    Enjoy present pleasures in such a way as not to injure future ones.
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    Variance in effort to drill hems no couod downs on a few things. The most obvious thing is probably the quality control on the screws. Some of the ones I've seen are pretty ordinary in terms of the sharpness of the point. A few times I've spent ages trying to get one to drill in, only to switch it for another and have it drive in in seconds.
    Measure twice, cut once, trim some off the end, trim some more. Too short. Rinse, Repeat.

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    http://www.hvaceducationaustralia.co...ew%20Types.pdf
    The above is really interesting.
    The troubleshooting guide on page 10 is helpful. P25 is about metal self drilling screws.
    Metal self drilling screws have a hardened point and are designed in a manner much the same as a HSS high speed steel drill bit.

    The speed the point travels through the steel is about ten times slower than the thread advance speed. Through 3mm steel the pint takes about 7 seconds to drill through, the thread one second.

    Best results are obtained using electric screw drivers (TEK guns) of approximately 380-650 watt rating, operating between 2.000-2,500rpm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spottiswoode View Post
    Variance in effort to drill hems no couod downs on a few things. The most obvious thing is probably the quality control on the screws. Some of the ones I've seen are pretty ordinary in terms of the sharpness of the point. A few times I've spent ages trying to get one to drill in, only to switch it for another and have it drive in in seconds.
    Is that first sentence from a chinese site and you used a chinglish translation..youre right about the screws.. 9 times out of 10 if its hard to screw it is the screw.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    Is that first sentence from a chinese site and you used a chinglish translation..youre right about the screws.. 9 times out of 10 if its hard to screw it is the screw.
    Man I hate autocorrect! Makes you lazy, thinking that you actually typing in real words when your fat fingers are typing gibberish.
    Measure twice, cut once, trim some off the end, trim some more. Too short. Rinse, Repeat.

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  21. #21
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    Wbut bebbfcd? U ongrstund qvdything
    Enjoy present pleasures in such a way as not to injure future ones.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapienreno View Post
    Some seem to go straight through but others take much longer,
    Janine
    you'll probably find the drill point on some of the screws is just cut/ground crap on some of the screws making them harder to start and not drill properly.
    Remember if you don't sin, then Jesus died for nothing

  23. #23
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    I think they are galvanised. I am not sure how that is done. Dipping them would probably result in different thicknesses. I don't know how the other methods work.

    I was thinking about using soap to enable me to put fasteners into my very old hardwood house frames. I wonder if silicon on them would work as well, or better?

    Silicon coatings are applied to injection needles (stainless steel) to make them easier to use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapienreno View Post
    I think they are galvanised. I am not sure how that is done. Dipping them would probably result in different thicknesses. I don't know how the other methods work.

    I was thinking about using soap to enable me to put fasteners into my very old hardwood house frames. I wonder if silicon on them would work as well, or better?

    Silicon coatings are applied to injection needles (stainless steel) to make them easier to use.
    Don't worry how the screws are done, it will be a very long time before they rust out your way.
    Soap is an old lubricant trick for screws into timber or plastic plugs etc, and silicone is just as good, but with most old hardwood, you need to predrill the hole first or there is a good chance you will bust the screw.
    Those of us who have been around a while will remember when carpenters would run screws and nails through their hair which was full of brylcream or californian poppy (hair oil).

  25. #25
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    Those of us who have been around a while will remember when carpenters would run screws and nails through their hair which was full of brylcream or californian poppy (hair oil).
    That was a long time ago. I remember Dad putting on the brylcream.

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