Hire the best Cladding Experts

Nails for Hardiplank Smooth Weatherboard and fixing method discussion

Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    17

    Default Nails for Hardiplank Smooth Weatherboard and fixing method discussion

    Hi

    I am about to begin cladding a shed in Hardie plank and wanted to get opinions on the best method to do this. I have a finishing nailer and according to JH install instructions 2.8x40mm gal nails should do the trick.
    Question is,
    1. Can this be done with a nailer straight into the board or will it split?
    2. Where is the best place to put the nail - top of the board so that the next board overhang will cover the nail, or on the top board overhang so that the nail goes through 2 boards but is visible.


    any other fixing tips would be greatly appreciated
    i.e windows and door frames flashing etc seems to be a minefield of flashing


    cheers

  2. #2
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,107

    Default

    You need a coil gun. i wouldnt go any closer than 25mm from the ends. maybe check the james hardie site. Im sure they have installation instructions. We used a framing gun with 50mm gal nails for the primeline on an entire house. Not one split or blowout.

  3. #3
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    17

    Default

    thanks
    JH install instructions say 2.8x40mm gal nails if you could do it with a framing gun then I should be good with the finishing gun. Its a lot gentler.

  4. #4
    The Master's Apprentice Bedford's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Yarra Valley Vic oz
    Posts
    8,238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barrow View Post
    thanks
    JH install instructions say 2.8x40mm gal nails if you could do it with a framing gun then I should be good with the finishing gun. Its a lot gentler.
    The Hardiplank nails are a flat head like clouts but a little smaller, I doubt you'll get them to work through a finishing gun.
    Last edited by Bedford; 12th Oct 2021 at 05:05 PM. Reason: finishing gun not fixing
    Posted by John2b, And no, BEVs are not going to save the planet, which doesn't need saving anyway.

  5. #5
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,107

    Default

    exactly ... the brad nails have a tiny head.. you need a clout type nail which is the same as the coil nails. Do NOT use a finishing gun.

  6. #6
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,755

    Default

    Coil gun if you want to do a good job.
    Bostitch is good, Hitachi is the RR
    https://www.totaltools.com.au/138543...-coiler-n66c1k

    https://www.totaltools.com.au/132733...ler-nv65af3h1z
    Science is never settled,
    it advances one funeral at the time.
    Max Planck

  7. #7
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    17

    Default

    am I missing something? I cant use a finishing gun but I can use a framer? or is the coil gun something different that will shoot a clout

    Thanks for you help

  8. #8
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,755

    Default

    Nail guns are chosen according to the nail they can shoot, rather than the way they are built. Or better, they are built to shoot a particular nail.

    What you are asking is, why can I use a Colt and not a Beretta.

    The right question is what sort of nail do you need for the job, not what sort of gun.
    You need a 2.8 x 40 gal flat head nail / round head , not a bullet head, not a clout, not a clipped head.
    You can drive this nail with a hammer or a gun.
    Any gun that can shoot that nail.
    If you go pig hunting and you want to use a 223, you need a gun that shoot that. If you prefer 308, only a gun in 308 will do

    Framers shoot full round or clipped head nails
    Finishing guns shoot braders either D, C or T and different variations ... no good for hardiplank.
    Coil guns shoot a variety of flat head nails and can load coils containing a large number of nails. It's the best choice for repeat shots, pallet, cladding, fencing etc.
    A coil gun will shoot 2.8x40 gal all day long, a bradder will not. A framer, if it shoots full round heads, no problem, although the framer tip will most likely mark your cladding unless it has a padded tip.
    Science is never settled,
    it advances one funeral at the time.
    Max Planck

  9. #9
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Thats a great explanation thanks Marc.

    Any views on nail placing i.e. top of the board so the next board hides it or at the bottom to go through 2 boards at once giving working out to 2 nails per board?
    is one nail per stud enough?

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Altona
    Posts
    80

    Default

    There's a load of great info on manufacturers website with videos by them on you tube.

    Maybe have a read of this from their website: https://assets.ctfassets.net/rg5y8r6...ion_230421.pdf

  11. #11
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,755

    Default

    I see their first choice of gun is Hitachi 65 ...
    Science is never settled,
    it advances one funeral at the time.
    Max Planck

  12. #12
    Seasoned DIY droog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,487

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barrow View Post
    Thats a great explanation thanks Marc.

    Any views on nail placing i.e. top of the board so the next board hides it or at the bottom to go through 2 boards at once giving working out to 2 nails per board?
    is one nail per stud enough?
    Weatherboards should not be nailed through 2 boards, you want them to be able to expand and contract. For Hardi plank boards it is often nailed at the top then there is no patching, there is no reason you cannot nail it at the bottom but like normal timber boards the nail should be placed above the line of overlap so it is fixing only that board.

  13. #13
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,107

    Default

    Indeed. top nail hidden bottom nail patched.

  14. #14
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I hired a coil nailer from Kennards and it was rubbish. It dry fired ever other nail then double nailed and got jammed. so I took it back for a refund and went with Marc's suggestion and bought a Bostich. Ill give that a go today.

  15. #15
    7K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    7,790

    Default

    Coulda done it by hand by now.
    But I do understand the need for new tools!

  16. #16
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    15,975

    Default

    Think I would have used a hammer, it's not a lot more effort.

  17. #17
    1K Club Member UseByDate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,342

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phild01 View Post
    Think I would have used a hammer, it's not a lot more effort.
    Radical.
    “What a fool believes, he sees. No wise man has the power to reason away”- The Doobie Brothers

  18. #18
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,107

    Default

    Its a hell of a lot more effort. take 10 times longer. Havent seen cladding nailed by hand since last century.

  19. #19
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    15,975

    Default

    It's only a shed, placing the board would be the hardest part.

  20. #20
    7K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    7,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    Its a hell of a lot more effort. take 10 times longer. Havent seen cladding nailed by hand since last century.
    Yeah but DIYers only need to do this once, not once a week or whatever, and the time is soon forgotten (in my experience anyway).

    Though I did once by a framer to do a 10m wall frame, because first and foremost I wanted a framer .

  21. #21
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    15,975

    Default

    Yes, framer is a must.

  22. #22
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,755

    Default

    Hi Barrow,how did you go with the cladding?
    Science is never settled,
    it advances one funeral at the time.
    Max Planck

  23. #23
    Novice
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by r3nov8or View Post
    Yeah but DIYers only need to do this once, not once a week or whatever, and the time is soon forgotten (in my experience anyway).

    Though I did once by a framer to do a 10m wall frame, because first and foremost I wanted a framer .
    The input is probably a bit late now.... but I think this point is overlooked a lot. "Professional" practices involve factors which have differing importance when doing the work yourself, ie the balance of speed, time and effort vs quality of finished product.

    The thing with nailing any cement board is that you are hoping that the cement binder is crushed to powder and the fibres punch straight through the other side. They don't part laterally like wood fibres, they just crack apart.

    I prefer to pre drill then use a hammer/palm nailer, eg a 2.5mm drill bit for a 2.8mm FC nail. The board is never cracked or weakened and I get the nails perfectly flush. 4.5mm eaves material is more forgiving, but once you get into thicker cladding material pre drilling is the safest way of avoiding any cracks and delamination of the fibres.

  24. #24
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,107

    Default

    The way these hardie weatherboards are made its pretty hard to crack. As i said we did an entire house with 14mm boards using framing nails. Sometimes nailing within 20mm from the end. Never had 1 board split or crack. Coil nails are even smaller so no chance. Timber weatherboards are best hand nailed but not the fibre cement ones. Also you can do something fast and still have a quality finish.

Similar Threads

  1. Hardieplank weatherboard smooth
    By Jackson.baker in forum Cladding
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 8th Mar 2016, 11:28 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 23rd Apr 2015, 07:58 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 13th Mar 2013, 12:13 AM
  4. Best method of fixing skirting?
    By apollo40 in forum Doors, Windows, Architraves & Skirts
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14th Jul 2009, 09:50 AM
  5. Hardiplank vs Weatherboard cost
    By jayem in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 20th Jun 2007, 08:31 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •