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Do no-eave gutters leak into house?

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  1. #1
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    Default Do no-eave gutters leak into house?

    I am getting a single story, fibro stud wall extension built. It has no eaves, because of setback requirements from a sewer main. The roof has a relatively low pitch (5 degrees), and is corrugated zincalume.

    I have heard that , in a big downpour, the gutter can overflow back into the ceiling.

    Does anyone know if this is true, and how to avoid it.

    Currently, the roofing iron is on, and the guttering is ready to install.

    Thanks

    Mark

  2. #2
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    Arent you supposed to put the gutter on first, then the tin?
    Thats how its done on site..

  3. #3
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    the project homes being built these days dont have eaves (i presume to keep costs down?!) i havent heard of any consistent leaking problems with this set up...

    how big is the area of your roof feeding this gutter?

    my suggestion is ensure the gutters are installed with atleast the min fall needed and keep them clean!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sports fan View Post

    my suggestion is ensure the gutters are installed with atleast the min fall needed and keep them clean!
    Gutters arent installed with fall these days.

  5. #5
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    If the gutter clogs (dirt, leaves, hail even) it will most likely overflow inwards before overflowing over the outer edge. Solutions for this are to keep clean and use one of the gutters with the pressed overflow vents about level with the back wall height. That will allow some release before the level in the gutter becomes dangerous.

    Pay a lot of attention to flashings and weathersealing of all doors, windows, etc on walls without eave overhang as they are much more exposed to storm conditions than they would be with 500-600mm of eave protection.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sports fan View Post
    the project homes being built these days dont have eaves (i presume to keep costs down?!) i havent heard of any consistent leaking problems with this set up...

    how big is the area of your roof feeding this gutter?

    my suggestion is ensure the gutters are installed with atleast the min fall needed and keep them clean!
    It's about 4.5 metres of tin feeding the gutter. Thanks for the advice

    Mark

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by malb View Post
    If the gutter clogs (dirt, leaves, hail even) it will most likely overflow inwards before overflowing over the outer edge. Solutions for this are to keep clean and use one of the gutters with the pressed overflow vents about level with the back wall height. That will allow some release before the level in the gutter becomes dangerous.

    Pay a lot of attention to flashings and weathersealing of all doors, windows, etc on walls without eave overhang as they are much more exposed to storm conditions than they would be with 500-600mm of eave protection.
    Thanks for the advice.

    Yes the builder has got the gutter with the vents. The supplied windows have pine reveals, so I primed them before they were installed, but I am still regarding them as a disposable item. I will build awnings over all windows and doors, though.

    I just realised that, because of the design of the roof, the gutter drops about 150mm over 12 m, so that should help run-off. I guess it could put pressure on the low end of the gutter though. I mean if it back flows to house, that would be the spot.

    Thanks again,

    Mark

  8. #8
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    you may like to consider putting in a leaf eater or similar exit on the gutter

    this will make the gutter stay emptier as there is no restiction on the water exiting

    doug

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkyHook View Post
    I have heard that , in a big downpour, the gutter can overflow back into the ceiling.

    Does anyone know if this is true, and how to avoid it.Thanks

    Mark

    Yes!
    Quite true in some [many] cases.

    In Port Hedland, and I guess many other places;
    most houses have No Gutters.
    as;
    It is either DRY,
    or
    DELUGE,
    and ANY Gutter would just overflow.
    Navvi

  10. #10
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    This issue has been in the press a bit recently. this might be of interest.

    http://www.smh.com.au/text/articles/...467388838.html

  11. #11
    A Member of the Holy Trinity silentC's Avatar
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    Doesn't matter how much fall you have if the water can't get away.

    My gutters often overflow to the front in a heavy downpour, even with the regulation number and position of downpipes. In extreme cases, they also overflow to the back despite the overflow perfs in the front, but it just runs down the fascia and to the ground because I have eaves.
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the kind of person I'm preaching to."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brickie View Post
    Gutters arent installed with fall these days.
    next your going to tell me bricks arent layed to a string line these days

  13. #13
    Apprentice (new member) Turpy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silentC View Post
    Doesn't matter how much fall you have if the water can't get away.

    My gutters often overflow to the front in a heavy downpour, even with the regulation number and position of downpipes. In extreme cases, they also overflow to the back despite the overflow perfs in the front, but it just runs down the fascia and to the ground because I have eaves.
    I had the same problem until I installed more downpipes.

    Why not install another downpipe at the other end.

  14. #14
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    It's not enough of a problem for us to worry about, but yes that would probably help.
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the kind of person I'm preaching to."

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