Hire the best Roofing Expert

Is this a good driver for roofing screws / tek screws?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 52
  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Townsville Qld
    Posts
    42

    Default Is this a good driver for roofing screws / tek screws?

    G'day, I want to buy a good tool to sheet a portal steel shed. I'm told the old impact driver will butcher the job. Is the attached Makita Screw Gun good for the job? (Makita 570w 2500rpm $289 from Total tools) I'm assuming from the shed specs (asking for something 2000rpm+) and the makita (advertising 2500rpm) that it is the rpm that make it more effective whacking in roofing screws without damaging them ?

    Any recommendations ?

    Thanks Blue

    untitled.jpg

  2. #2
    Slow but rough Uncle Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    North Cooma, Canberra
    Posts
    5,011

    Default

    Mate, I built my 5x10 shed with a cordless impact driver without any problems or butchering anything. But as long as that will take the necessary or supplied screws then it should work.

  3. #3
    ajm
    ajm is offline
    Golden Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    BrisVegas
    Posts
    776

    Default Is this a good driver for roofing screws / tek screws?

    What he said. Built many a roofed the g for us and for the animals, all using a big standard cordless drill. No need for special tools.

    Sent fr

  4. #4
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Townsville Qld
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Would one of those screw guns be better than an impact driver ? I can't say I've ever taken the time to note what pro roofers are using but would the makita be better than an impact driver ? snip from my shed manufacturer...screen-shot-2020-07-07-1.27.01-pm.jpg

  5. #5
    Senior Member YoungBolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    272

    Default

    People still buy electric power tools?

    I've never seen a roofer use a screw drill to install roofing screws. It's all done with an impact driver and standard drill. Predrill the hole in the sheet and underlying support (timber/metal) with the drill then use a impact driver to drive the bastard home.

    Screw guns are for professional gyprockers and not much else.

    Is your shed from an overseas manufacturer?

  6. #6
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YoungBolt View Post
    People still buy electric power tools?

    I've never seen a roofer use a screw drill to install roofing screws. It's all done with an impact driver and standard drill. Predrill the hole in the sheet and underlying support (timber/metal) with the drill then use a impact driver to drive the bastard home.

    Screw guns are for professional gyprockers and not much else.

    Is your shed from an overseas manufacturer?
    This could not be further from the truth.

    Most of today's roofers use screw guns and they sound like a hammer drill when the disengage section of the driver hits the roof, depresses, and the clutch lets go to stop the screw going any further.

    That noise you hear sounds like a hammer drill.

    In the 70's there were no screw guns, so drills were used, and that was when you had to first drill the sheet and purlin because screws were not self drilling teks.

    If I were doing a roof today I would not bother with a screw gun as I have never owned one, always used a drill, but the OP would be wise to get a screw gun because I have seen people try to screw a roof with a drill but have no idea of when to let the trigger go so the drill will stop driving the screw.

  7. #7
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,317

    Default

    Buy a good cordless impact driver and drill. You will use it for many other things.
    Makita, Dewalt, Milwaukee or Bosch blue, not necessarily in that order.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Townsville Qld
    Posts
    42

    Default

    This is the second portal steel kit I've put up, both manufacturers wanted 2000rpm+ screw gun and warned not to use impact drivers (widespan & allcover, both using strammit steel kits I believe). They usually indicated a class 4 roofing screw is voided by using impact. I understand what they are getting at, can usually see wear on the screw head after driving it in with impact . Not saying an impact driver is ineffective, have used one plenty.

    Talking about steel construction here. Nobody drills then drives, not into steel and certainly not a pro. Impact drivers may be more effective with timber roof rafters?.

    thanks for your tips, I appreciate your perspectives.

  9. #9
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Impact driver is all you need. Use Self tapping screws which are standard anyway and dont pre-drill. Totally unnecessary. Taking an electric tool on a roof is a pain and the lead is just a trip hazard. No roofers would use that.

  10. #10
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    IMPACT DRIVERS ARE NOT USED TO SCREW DOWN A ROOF.

    Is that plain enough ??????????

  11. #11
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,317

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluehorse View Post
    This is the second portal steel kit I've put up, both manufacturers wanted 2000rpm+ screw gun and warned not to use impact drivers (widespan & allcover, both using strammit steel kits I believe). They usually indicated a class 4 roofing screw is voided by using impact. I understand what they are getting at, can usually see wear on the screw head after driving it in with impact . Not saying an impact driver is ineffective, have used one plenty.

    Talking about steel construction here. Nobody drills then drives, not into steel and certainly not a pro. Impact drivers may be more effective with timber roof rafters?.

    thanks for your tips, I appreciate your perspectives.
    If the shed manufacturer indicates screwdriver, use a screwdriver. Makita is a good brand. The choice between impact driver and screwdriver is based on the fastener used and the material you are screwing. I associate screwdrivers with gyprock fixing, but can see how they will work on a roof.
    Do you have a photo of the screws used? Are they just ordinary tek self drilling screws with a hexagonal head?
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  12. #12
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,317

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    IMPACT DRIVERS ARE NOT USED TO SCREW DOWN A ROOF.

    Is that plain enough ??????????

    Maybe you are right? Ha ha

    https://www.brsusa.com/blog/impact-v...hat-works-best

    Plenty of cordless screw guns to choose from, no need to buy a corded tool.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  13. #13
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    IMPACT DRIVERS ARE NOT USED TO SCREW DOWN A ROOF.

    Is that plain enough ??????????
    Every single roofer ive ever seen in the last 5 years uses an impact driver. Its the ONLY tool to use.l What would you use? Get with the times mate. seems you are too old fashioned.

  14. #14
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    Every single roofer ive ever seen in the last 5 years uses an impact driver. Its the ONLY tool to use.l What would you use? Get with the times mate. seems you are too old fashioned.
    They are using a screw gun which you think is an impact driver because you are not bright enough to know the difference.
    You are in Brisbane so any time you want to meet up I will be happy to show you the difference.
    Better still, go to a tool shop, any tool shop, and ask them what roofers are using, then come back and tell me you were wrong.
    FFS every roofer is using battery powered screw guns

  15. #15
    Senior Member YoungBolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Must say the roofers I've seen on a few jobs did look like they were using impact drivers, but I wasn't looking too closely. They certainly sound like one!

    Things are getting heated! Do we need to bring in mummy and daddy ?

    .... who would be considered mummy and daddy around here anyway?

  16. #16
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Ive been in the building game 30 years. I know exactly what an impact driver is. I screwed my whole roof off with an impact driver, Ive seen my roofers use them ..It is by far the best and fastest way to do a roof.
    Show me a picture of a screw gun and an impact driver

  17. #17
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,317

    Default

    Hi Sol381 ... to be fair to all concerned, I have fixed my share of corrugated iron roof sheets with impact driver, and seen my share of roofers doing same with impact drivers ... however ... I have never done this to metal rafters, only timber rafters ... so it is possible that there is a difference. Stripping the flimsy thread in a thin metal rafter is easy and a screw gun will limit this occurrence, and the screws used may be different, I don't know.
    Also ... over tightening tek screws on a metal roof is easy to do if one is a bit ... how to say, distracted. Squash the seal and then undo it and forget it and you have a leaking screw.

    So perhaps when it is possible to use an impact driver, it may be desirable to use a screw gun.
    As for corded or cordless that is a no brainer. Going on a roof with a cord extension is a pain no one deserves, yet is is possible and the price difference in the tool may be justified if it is a one off job.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  18. #18
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    ive never seen a screw gun on a roof. Screw guns are just used for plasterboad but even then most will use a collated screw gun. NO idea why anyone would use a designated screw gun or why they even sell them anymore. Even plasterers use impact drivers when needed to screw a single screw. Having said that i think cyclic is just referring to is a simple drill or drill driver . It is quieter than impact and ive used it on roofs as well. Its just a lot heavier and ive never seen roofers use them. Impacts are noisy and you can hear a roof being screwed from blocks away but its whats being used now. Both will suffice.

  19. #19
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    ive never seen a screw gun on a roof. Screw guns are just used for plasterboad but even then most will use a collated screw gun. NO idea why anyone would use a designated screw gun or why they even sell them anymore. Even plasterers use impact drivers when needed to screw a single screw. Having said that i think cyclic is just referring to is a simple drill or drill driver . It is quieter than impact and ive used it on roofs as well. Its just a lot heavier and ive never seen roofers use them. Impacts are noisy and you can hear a roof being screwed from blocks away but its whats being used now. Both will suffice.
    The noise you are hearing from blocks away is the clutch
    The drill simply drives until the screw gun hits the roof and the clutch makes a sound not all dissimilar to a hammer drill/impact drill.
    Screw guns as shown by the OP are the tool being used to screw down most roofs.

    As to your 30 years in the building game, you still have a ways to go.
    Last year, 2019, I cancelled my QBCC (formerly BSA) which I held from 1980.
    I started my apprenticeship in 1965 and am still fixing other peoples mistakes today.
    FWIW my QBCC showed Builder Low Rise/Builder Repairs and Maintenance/Plumber Drainer.
    I have worked on and in some cases controlled everything from high rise to houses including a lot of renos along the way.
    The Builder Repairs and Maintenance was for Commercial Industrial.
    As to roofing most of the roofs I did in the 70's and 80's were industrial sheds which also included wall sheeting
    But I have done my fair share of house roofs also
    When you have done roofs using 11,000 screws, not to mention walls as well, then you should know a bit about roofing.
    Good luck in your next 25 years.

  20. #20
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,317

    Default

    Cyclic, all that does not clarify the issue at hand.
    Is the screwgun the one that drives collated screws? Is there such thing as collated roof screws?
    What is the damage to the screw that is trying to be avoided?
    Does the screw driven by the screwgun differ from an ordinary tek screw?
    https://www.melbournetoolsales.com.a...-adjustable-to
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  21. #21
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Cyclic, all that does not clarify the issue at hand.
    A) Is the screwgun the one that drives collated screws? Is there such thing as collated roof screws?
    B) What is the damage to the screw that is trying to be avoided?
    C) Does the screw driven by the screwgun differ from an ordinary tek screw?
    https://www.melbournetoolsales.com.a...-adjustable-to
    A) No, the one you show is the type I am referring to. It is a roofing screw gun. I have never seen collated roof screws.
    B) I have never used an impact driver but I can imaging with impact the screw would have a tendency to bounce off the sheet but also bust the drill tip on metal purlins (industrial )
    I also believe it would tend to punch through the sheet and metal batten rather than drill through
    C) Not sure what the question is. Most roof screws are 50x12 hex with neo for metal fix or 50x12 type 17 for timber fix (different cutting shank) for use on custom orb, or 65 long for memory for trimdeck.

    I believe the gun you show is probably the type being used but is being referred to as an impact driver due to the sound when, as I have said, the clutch disengages when the screw is almost driven home to it's final point of contact with the roof.

    To use an impact driver without clutch would mean letting go the trigger just like a drill to stop the screw driving too far into the roof.

  22. #22
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Actually impact drivers dont have a clutch. The noise is the spring pushing down on the hammer.

  23. #23
    ajm
    ajm is offline
    Golden Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    BrisVegas
    Posts
    776

    Default Is this a good driver for roofing screws / tek screws?

    Pissing contests are funny and disturbing to watch from the sidelines. It's like when two blokes fight over a chick. The first punch is about the chick and then the rest is about the egos of the two protagonists.

    I have had assistance from both blokes involved here (and Marc too) and value their opinions and experience above most. The thing here is that the OP is not (I don't think) a professional roofer so does he really need the tool that a pro roofer uses? While it's nice to have the best tools that are available, it's expensive for single use jobs.

    So, to the OP, as a non professional who likes to do a good job on his projects big and small, it's really up to you. From what has been said above, you could use any of the tools mentioned.

    Sent fro

  24. #24
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Fair points mate . I was just giving my opinion on what ive seen. I didnt come here to get into a fight. More than one way to skin a cat. Use a screw gun, impact, drill driver. or a socket of you want.

  25. #25
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    15,524

    Default

    I have in the past and recently done my small shed roof with an impact driver and there are odd moments of overdriving just a touch. Was unaware of using a specialised screw gun for this application but asking, can you still overdrive with such a tool. Maybe it is the secondary oversized thread on the roofing screw stripping the roofing being the concern!

  26. #26
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Even the pros over drive them with an impact. Just take your finder off teh trigger just before the screw head hits and then lightly tighten. its easy to reverse the screw out if it is too deep. Also most impacts come with at least 3 speeds and some like the milwaukee have a self tapping screw mode to avoid over tightening. Never tried this setting on roofs but might work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLu4w7_Mi7A. Skip to the 4 minute mark.

  27. #27
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    Even the pros over drive them with an impact. Just take your finder off teh trigger just before the screw head hits and then lightly tighten. its easy to reverse the screw out if it is too deep. Also most impacts come with at least 3 speeds and some like the milwaukee have a self tapping screw mode to avoid over tightening. Never tried this setting on roofs but might work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLu4w7_Mi7A. Skip to the 4 minute mark.
    After talking with my friendly tool man at Get Tools Direct Maroochydore it appears you and I are both correct.
    He tells me the most popular roofing tool is a roofing driver with torque settings and clutch, but some people do use an impact driver depending on the job.

    Hopefully the OP will use a battery drill without buying a special driver which he may never use again.

  28. #28
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    or just hire one for the day.

  29. #29
    2K Club Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    brisbane . australia
    Posts
    2,076

    Default

    Jeez . i just realized i skipped over to 2,000 posts. When can i expect my carton of beer.

  30. #30
    ajm
    ajm is offline
    Golden Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    BrisVegas
    Posts
    776

    Default Is this a good driver for roofing screws / tek screws?

    Maybe cyclic can deliver it....


    Sent fro

  31. #31
    Community Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    7,166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post

    Hopefully the OP will use a battery drill without buying a special driver which he may never use again.
    For a one off job that would be the best

  32. #32
    Community Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    7,166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sol381 View Post
    Jeez . i just realized i skipped over to 2,000 posts. When can i expect my carton of beer.
    To late nothing for 2002.

  33. #33
    Slow but rough Uncle Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    North Cooma, Canberra
    Posts
    5,011

    Default

    Congrats sol381! Been good posts too. Unfortunately we can only do a cartoon of beer

    beer-toasting-260nw-705945535.jpg

  34. #34
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    13,317

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    A) No, the one you show is the type I am referring to. It is a roofing screw gun. I have never seen collated roof screws.
    B) I have never used an impact driver but I can imaging with impact the screw would have a tendency to bounce off the sheet but also bust the drill tip on metal purlins (industrial )
    I also believe it would tend to punch through the sheet and metal batten rather than drill through
    .
    Now I can understand the confusion. (Or I think so anyway)
    An impact driver, has a rotating mass that turns and as the resistance grows, it bounces off at every 1/4 turn or so and the impact is angular not axial. The impact happens as the mass rotates and gives the screw that extra punch but it is not along the shaft like hammering a nail, rather it is around the shank to give an extra turn, like using a hammer on the end of a spanner to tighten a nut.
    A hammer drill has axial impact and would do what you describe, bounce off the sheet and all that. No one in his right mind would use a hammer drill on a roof. They are designed to drive masonry drills and the axial (vertical) impact chips the concrete as the drill rotates.

    The screw gun drives the screw with a smooth torsion as a drill would, but is designed to stop as it makes contact with the surface to avoid overtightening, just like it is the case with screwing gyprock. I am not sure how a screw gun would overcome hard wood rafters without the rotating mass to help driving the screw.

    I can understand a manufacturer recommending a screw gun so that the operator does not overtighten the screws, however it is a bit like recommending rubber mallets to drive nails just in case you miss a blow and damage the surface.
    I remember my wife use to tell me to get a rubber mallet when I was building the second floor, before I learned of compressors and nail guns, and used a 24 oz framing hammer instead and was upsetting the whole neighbourhood.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  35. #35
    4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    nsw
    Posts
    4,105

    Default

    It looks like I missed the all the fun, different materials need different tools, for light metal roofing with pine or light metal battens a cordless impact driver is the most efficient, when you get into heavy gauge purlins or HWD then you need something with some more grunt than an impact driver, as they are too slow once they have to drop back to impact to drill through heavy gauge material. I haven't seen a screw gun used on a roof for around 15 years, years ago I used to build portal frame industrial sheds with roof areas up to 3700m2 with corded screw guns, I put a couple of roofs on just recently with a makita 18v 4 mode brushless impact driver, I have never screwed down a roof so fast in my life, what a great little machine. Screws can be over driven with any driving tool.
    inter

  36. #36
    Novice
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Townsville Qld
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Thanks lads. Yes its the solid z purlins making me question the reliable old impact driver. It has always served me well on timber batten. Some of the z purlins are at 1.9mm, so cyclonic standard. I'll give a screwgun a go just because I collect different tools; something I'm sure you appreciate.

  37. #37
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    coolum qld 4573
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Intertd6 states that going into HWD requires more grunt.....i'm a bit confused, you' re saying the impact driver provides that grunt?
    I also have another question
    I am trying to REMOVE roofing screws with a shovel bit .
    That is, a simple horizontal SLOT about 1 cm long is in the screw head , and the screws are in hardwood battens for 40 years .
    I'm concerned about breaking the screws or stripping the slots in the head of the screw.
    Suggestions...would one best use an impact drill in reverse ???
    Thks Rae

  38. #38
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    coolum qld 4573
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Please reply soon everyone

  39. #39
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    You have not given enough info in that you don't say what the roof sheeting is, but no matter what you use, if the screws are going to break they will break.
    If the sheeting is ac the screws will probably come out ok being steel, but if the roofing is alloy then the screws will be same and won't be very strong.
    Having said that, the holes would have been pre drilled so you may be ok because hardwood shrinks away from the screw.
    What you use is up to you because using mechanical drills etc with a blade is always going to be awkard unless there is a fitting you can buy to fit the drill which has a socket surrounding the blade so the blade does not come off the screw head.
    Something like a hex drive for hex head screws but with a blade in the middle, but I have not seen such a fitting
    There is a good chance the screws were fitted using a hand brace.



    .

  40. #40
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    coolum qld 4573
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks appreciate it
    Ac means asbestos composite?
    That's what the present roofing is...supersix

  41. #41
    Apprentice (new member)
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    coolum qld 4573
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Have re-read your reply cyclic. Yes agree, i have never seen such an adapter nor heard of one. Local , longtime hardware had not either and winced when i showed him a sample screw that had come out without breaking. He did recommend a more powerful impact driver than what he had in store, and called Makita to see about more grunt. They recommended an 18v 4 mode model ( skin only at $310) with 175Nm fastening torque.
    Of course my concern is getting the screws out without having to grind them out or use vice grips to slowly do the job.
    Again, appreciate you sharing your knowledge and thoughts.
    Saw an asbestos removal team taking screws out the other day, but didnt get opportunity to ask what they would do.
    I have my licence to do the job for over 10 sq m. , but have not in fact done such a roof demolition.
    I am looking forward to overcoming my concerns.
    Any other tips are greatly appreciated.

  42. #42
    4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Kangaroo Island
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    Slotted screwdriver bits with a spring loaded centering guide used to be common, but seem to have disappeared. They were handy for driving one-way security screws and might be useful for slot head screw extraction.

    https://www.primeline.net/rg-18514-o...-bit-916-steel
    Before you speak, ask yourself: Is it necessary, it is true, does it improve on the silence? - Baba

  43. #43
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by raelph View Post
    Have re-read your reply cyclic. Yes agree, i have never seen such an adapter nor heard of one. Local , longtime hardware had not either and winced when i showed him a sample screw that had come out without breaking. He did recommend a more powerful impact driver than what he had in store, and called Makita to see about more grunt. They recommended an 18v 4 mode model ( skin only at $310) with 175Nm fastening torque.
    Of course my concern is getting the screws out without having to grind them out or use vice grips to slowly do the job.
    Again, appreciate you sharing your knowledge and thoughts.
    Saw an asbestos removal team taking screws out the other day, but didnt get opportunity to ask what they would do.
    I have my licence to do the job for over 10 sq m. , but have not in fact done such a roof demolition.
    I am looking forward to overcoming my concerns.
    Any other tips are greatly appreciated.
    AC = Asbestos Cement fwiw no biggie.
    As I said, biggest concern is the blade slipping off the screw head because then it is usually a situation where you have to use vice grips/locking pliers which really is not all that bad because when they break they usually break on the thread at the batten, in fact in the 70's we would actually knock them side to side to break them rather than unscrew them.
    If you are intending to replace the AC with metal roofing I would not be concerned with the screws breaking.
    Also fwiw are you aware you must batten screw all battens and use tie downs to the framing in accordance with QBCC.
    Also depending what sheeting you use and if you are reusing the existing battens they will be rock hard to get new screws into and on the bottom batten where you screw every second corrugation or every corrugation to bird proof, you need to stagger the screws so as to not split the batten.
    It is not as bad when using trimdeck profile.
    Have fun.

  44. #44
    Community Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    7,166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    Also depending what sheeting you use and if you are reusing the existing battens they will be rock hard to get new screws into and on the bottom batten where you screw every second corrugation or every corrugation to bird proof, you need to stagger the screws so as to not split the batten.
    It is not as bad when using trimdeck profile.
    Have fun.
    With old hardwood it would be a two stage process first to drill then screw. I had to do a bit of work on my place recently and was using wood screws into old hardwood and I drilled a pilot hole that would be the diameter if the thread base and broke screws but adding a bit of soap to the thread made it easier.

  45. #45
    3K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    3,560

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bros View Post
    With old hardwood it would be a two stage process first to drill then screw. I had to do a bit of work on my place recently and was using wood screws into old hardwood and I drilled a pilot hole that would be the diameter if the thread base and broke screws but adding a bit of soap to the thread made it easier.
    Possibly on the bottom batten drilling would be good, but today's timber fix roof screws are usually good to go into old battens provided the fixing tool/driver has enough grunt.
    I have only ever used a Makita 750 w electric drill for roofing.
    Probably not allowed to use 240 power on a roof these days, and I must admit to dragging leads across a roof and hearing zzzzz behind me as the lead was stabbed by a sharp bit of iron.
    With regards to soap, are you not old enough to remember carpenters running 3" nails through their brylcream/california poppy coated hair.LOL

  46. #46
    Community Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    7,166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    With regards to soap, are you not old enough to remember carpenters running 3" nails through their brylcream/california poppy coated hair.LOL
    No don't remember that happening.

  47. #47
    3K Club Member johnc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sale
    Age
    65
    Posts
    3,880

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclic View Post
    Possibly on the bottom batten drilling would be good, but today's timber fix roof screws are usually good to go into old battens provided the fixing tool/driver has enough grunt.
    I have only ever used a Makita 750 w electric drill for roofing.
    Probably not allowed to use 240 power on a roof these days, and I must admit to dragging leads across a roof and hearing zzzzz behind me as the lead was stabbed by a sharp bit of iron.
    With regards to soap, are you not old enough to remember carpenters running 3" nails through their brylcream/california poppy coated hair.LOL

    Remember it very well, rubbing the nail against a piece of candle was a thing as well, not to mention reversing the nail for the first tap to help prevent splitting then turning around the nail to drive it in.

  48. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Melbourne - Yarra Ranges
    Posts
    428

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluehorse View Post
    Some of the z purlins are at 1.9mm, so cyclonic standard. I'll give a screwgun a go just because I collect different tools; something I'm sure you appreciate.
    Are you coastal or within 10km of the coast?
    The reason I ask is a distinct consideration (and I'II make a couple of assumptions here) is using an impact driver will damage and remove the coating on the screw head more than the Screw gun.

    If that assumption is correct, then you will have a larger problem down the track with many screw heads rusting away. Living in a cyclonic area....I'd suggest that's not a good thing So investing in a screw gun or hiring one out for a "one off job" might end up being a good investment.

    To give you some perspective, Recently sold a place in Cairns and on inspection there were ~50 screws on the roof quite rusty and small in number in the context of the entire roof.

    When discussing the issue, it was one of the better 13 years old roofs in the area as quite a few houses had significant rusting issues with >50% of the roofing screws usually affected. Would be interesting to turn back time to find out what they used to drive in the screws. I've never really seen this issue here in Vic (50km to 300km inland - no salt air and little humidity compared to FNQ).
    It could also be the high humidity that plays a part.

  49. #49
    4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Kangaroo Island
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bros View Post
    No don't remember that happening.
    Quote Originally Posted by johnc View Post
    Remember it very well, rubbing the nail against a piece of candle was a thing as well, not to mention reversing the nail for the first tap to help prevent splitting then turning around the nail to drive it in.
    I remember chipies on building sites blunting the point of nails and then using a bucket of something slimy to coat them with to help them in. Bros you must be the younger bro...
    Before you speak, ask yourself: Is it necessary, it is true, does it improve on the silence? - Baba

  50. #50
    4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    nsw
    Posts
    4,105

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by raelph View Post
    Intertd6 states that going into HWD requires more grunt.....i'm a bit confused, you' re saying the impact driver provides that grunt?
    I also have another question
    I am trying to REMOVE roofing screws with a shovel bit .
    That is, a simple horizontal SLOT about 1 cm long is in the screw head , and the screws are in hardwood battens for 40 years .
    I'm concerned about breaking the screws or stripping the slots in the head of the screw.
    Suggestions...would one best use an impact drill in reverse ???
    Thks Rae
    More grunt means a fast speed drill, impact drivers will drop back to impact & take longer to get a screw in.
    inter

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Silicon Bronze screws vs Galv Class 3 screws?
    By Watters in forum Bathrooms
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31st Aug 2016, 08:08 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 8th May 2013, 11:44 PM
  3. zincalume roofing screws question
    By gg23 in forum Roofing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21st Feb 2008, 11:00 PM
  4. leftover roofing screws
    By hilux in forum Roofing
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 27th Nov 2007, 10:48 AM
  5. Tekgun for roofing screws
    By PeterR10 in forum Roofing
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12th Apr 2006, 09:01 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •