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Waterstop angle dilema - floor heating

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  1. #1
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    Default Waterstop angle dilema - floor heating

    I am in the midst of a bathroom renovation. I am planning to use a frameless showerscreen and fit a waterstop angle around the shower.

    I am installing floor heating in the screed. The supplier has recomended extending the floor heating into the shower area.

    I was planning to sika the ally waterstop angle to the concrete slab, then screed and waterproof over the screed.

    I have a dilema. How do I get the floor heat cable into the shower area past the waterstop? Would it be acceptable to drill a hole through the angle to pass the cable through and seal with sika? Or would it be better to chase the slab a bit under the angle to get the cable through?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bcnr33v View Post

    I was planning to sika the ally waterstop angle to the concrete slab, then screed and waterproof over the screed.
    If you are waterproofing above the screed then your waterstop needs to be above the screed, otherwise it serves no real purpose.

  3. #3
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    Thanks. That makes sense. I was planning to put the angle under the screed but waterproof over the screed and onto the angle. It sounds like i would be better off sticking the angle to the screed though?

  4. #4
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    Well the water stop is designed to separate your shower area from the rest of the room. Water under your tile bed should remain in the shower area with a water stop and the membrane will take the water to the leak control flange. Standard allows you to waterproof under or over the screed but whatever you do the membrane should be continuous inside and outside the shower area and go over (reinforced with bandage) the waterstop. Best practice would be to waterproof over and under the screed. What sort of shower are you installing, frameless, semi frameless?

  5. #5
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    I was planning to waterproof under and over the screed. Planning a frameless shower screen but dont mind if it has a small aluminium hob to hide the waterstop angle

  6. #6
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    Waterproof your substrate under the screed to the puddle flange, do the whole room. Then screed, then waterproof over the screed going over the waterstop.

    Having a waterstop that comes through the tile and into a channel is better than frameless but most people prefer the look of frameless. Another option is a product called Waterstop Streamline. It works very well. I recently did a shower with it. You have a small 60mm step over. Bellow is the product during installation and the finished result. Screed goes inside waterstop and frame is fitted on the inside of the waterstop. It also saves the hassle of trying to continue your tile layout inside the shower.

    img_3007.jpgimg_3109.jpg

  7. #7
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    Thanks so much for this. So I think you are saying:

    1. waterproof the slab of the whole room BEFORE fitting the waterstop
    2. Sika the waterstop to the waterproofed floor
    3. Screed
    4. Waterproof the whole room again, going over the waterstop

    Before doing step 1. I could cut a channel under the angle for floor heat cable to enter the shower area.


    That way the water stop will keep water in the shower above the screed. If there is any issue and the screed waterproofing fails, the slab membrane will catch it but water can escape from the shower area.

    I like the idea of the waterstop extending above the tiles. In other bathrooms, we have frameless screens that have an aluminium hob at the bottom. These could cover the waterstop.

  8. #8
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    No not like that.

    1. Recess your puddle flange into the slab. Prime slab with a general purpose primer and non-porous surfaces with an non-porous primer.
    2. Waterproof the whole slab. Up the walls 150mm outside the shower and well above the shower rose inside the shower. 2 coats with bond breakers etc.
    3. Screed. I'm assuming you have a set-down in the slab? Think about a modified screed that aids in water repellency. Something like Gripset 11Y.
    4. Give the screed a 7 minimum days to cure as you will be sandwiching any moisture. Prime your screed. Stick the water stop to the screed so it sits under your glass frame. Have the waterstop come up as high as the frame will allow.
    5. Waterproof the screed and over the waterstop using bandage for strength over the stop and around the waste etc. Just tie the waterproofing in to your under-screed membrane on the floor and walls by 100mm or so. No need to do the whole room again.

    Any water under the tile in the shower will get to the puddle flange via the top of the screed. Any water that finds its way into the screed bed will get to the puddle flange over your first membrane although bear in mind there is no fall under the screed so all the membrane is really doing is protecting your substrate.

  9. #9
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    Oh...and make sure the membrane is compatible with underfloor heating. You may need to go with a cementitious membrane. Use a cable retainer matt over your first membrane and also over the 100mm lap joins you will make with the second membrane.

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    Thanks so much.

    All makes sense. Just two question:

    1. what do you mean by cable retailer matt? and

    2. I presume I will need another bondbreaker between the screed and walls?

  11. #11
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    1. Underfloor heating I've seen is laid on a retainer matt that keeps it all in place.
    2. Yes. Anywhere you may expect some movement - wall to floor and wall to wall joints - should have a bond breaker.

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