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Cutting down the verticals on a double bunk bed to reduce total height

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  1. #1
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    Default Cutting down the verticals on a double bunk bed to reduce total height

    I have a tent and am trying to achieve the outcome in this blog post

    https://goannaray.travellerspoint.co...tFGoxwMxvgQXKA

    p3150672.jpg

    but you will note she used wood. Is there a way to either cut down the original metal verticals or make a new one. Its too bad they werent female at both ends of the vertical

    https://www.oztrail.com.au/products/deluxe-double-bunk

    original unit above

    instructions below, you can see part C are the verticals

    https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/00...69496832477530

    oztrail-double-bunk-instructions-image.jpg

    also see the uprights here at about 1.30min

    https://youtu.be/cq30lwO2lUA?list=null&t=94

    id have something machined if necessary, one bloke mentioned i should lathe up some strong plastic, cant remember the name of it

  2. #2
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    I would cut the original upright in the middle. Remove as much as you want to reduce the height from one of the sections or a bit from both to keep the cut in the center, and then insert a steel pipe that its snug inside that pipe, about 200 in at each end. Job done.
    Note that the key is to know the internal diameter of the upright and to source a pipe that fits. You could use a hardwood dowel for the same purpose
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    I would cut the original upright in the middle. Remove as much as you want to reduce the height from one of the sections or a bit from both to keep the cut in the center, and then insert a steel pipe that its snug inside that pipe, about 200 in at each end. Job done.
    Note that the key is to know the internal diameter of the upright and to source a pipe that fits. You could use a hardwood dowel for the same purpose

    cheers for your reply. Are you sure with your idea I don't need to steel flange the pipe like this?
    Note: it was the need for that flange that made one guy tell me its too hard re steel but to lathe down this strong plastic stuff. As a side question Mark or anyone, how do you take a pipe and flange the ends?



    The solution on the blog obviously didnt do that but she needed to put bolts in to stop the dowel from jamming in there as below (or refer back to the blog link above)

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails flanged-metal-vertical.jpg   modified-dowel-ends.jpg  

  4. #4
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    Cut off the reduced part of the upright then cut off the length you want to lower it by. Slide the reducer into the cut piece of pipe and either get it welded or fit a nut and bolt or even screws to hold the reducer in place, you wouldn't lose too much length on the reducer by sliding it in just enough to secure it to the pipe. This way there are no unsightly joins when it's all assembled
    Never argue with idiots, they will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.


  5. #5
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    for interest apparently the plastic I spoke of is Acetal

    Acetal- Dotmar Engineering Plastics Australia


    Acetal's great machinability together with its dimensional stability, mechanical strength, zero moisture absorption and good load-bearing properties make it ideal for close-tolerance parts.

    Key Benefits:


    • High hardness and stiffness
    • Very high mechanical properties
    • Excellent creep resistance and dimensional stability
    • Excellent dielectrical properties
    • Low co-efficient of friction

  6. #6
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    There are many different ways to do that. What I propose needs little in the way of skills or tools. Just a hacksaw and find the right size pipe or dowel. No need for anything else if the insert sits snug in place. Because the vertical pipe is the same size, the load is supported by the edge of the pipe. Lateral load is supported by the insert. no need for anything else.
    Tube end forming is done with special tools, usually ram-forming into a die.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
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  7. #7
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    Hi Marc

    what about this solution, more or less yours but not using the original verticals at all.



    I have two options of aluminum and Stainless steel (25.4 + 23.7 actually)



    The aluminum came out all scratched up and was a bit harder to push in but what do people recommend out of all these Bunnings finds

    Aluminum
    Stainless steel 23.7 (https://flexistorage.com.au/products...-steel-2400mm/)

    Stainless steel 25.4 (https://flexistorage.com.au/products...-steel-2400mm/)

    I assume Aluminium is stronger? but would the SS suffice? can i put silicone spray in there to help with install and pack away?

    Other issue
    (note the white pole on the LH image below is just to demonstrate the depth down of that part of the frame)




    Do i left the poles go as far down and up into the frame as possible (little bit harder to insert and remember its for camping so we want ease) or just match the factory 60mm or so?

    thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails replacement-pole-image-1.jpg   replacement-pole-image-2.jpg   replacement-pole-image-3.jpg   replacement-pole-image-4.jpg  

  8. #8
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    ...trouble is its the flang that takes the weight and stops the post from being rammed in super hard. I'd be wanting to keep the flange ends if it were me.

    Whitey's idea would work. Marc's would work although Id probably mig weld the join.
    The only other option I could think of if you want to keep the original uprights is what you've done with some new uprights BUT, weld: - a spacer, nut, bend some rod or flat steel around or simply a thick weld to stop the risers from being forced in and jammed with the weight of the person on top or kids jumping on top.

  9. #9
    4K Club Member Marc's Avatar
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    Inserting props that loosely go into the pipe and stop at the bend, is a rather daggy inelegant solution, worthy of Gilligan's Island show.
    Keeping the original upright held together by a tightly rammed insert is the way to go, short of welding the two parts together or fabricate a new frame. For this solution to succeed, it is necessary to cut perfectly square, or cut a few millimeters too long on both cuts and adjust by filing down until the two parts fit square.
    If done properly there is no need for welding.
    As for sourcing material for this, i would first go to a steel supplier and check what fits in your uprights.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect
    Mark Twain

  10. #10
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    ...this company can do custom poles for you. Just give them the overall length, diameter, thickness and "squeezed end diameter/length for a quote.
    https://supapeg.com.au/custom-made-poles-2/


    Have a chat to these guy's https://www.suparvaustralia.com.au/p...nut-thumbscrew

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