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double lintels over large span

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  1. #1
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    Default double lintels over large span

    Constructing a load-bearing wall (to support trusses with corrugated iron roof) that will house 1 double french door and a single window either side, leaving only enough room for 2/45 studs at either end (plus 20mm spacing). The total length of this wall is 3.8m. A lintel (2/190x45) will span the entire length. Im assuming that the lintel should be placed over BOTH studs at either end, and metal bracing straps over the lintel and attached to the double studs. I hope this is correct.

    Also as the windows and doors are such a tight fit there is no space for studs between the window frames and door jamb. So the door jamb and window frame will butt up against each other. This is how they appear in the architects drawings. Just need confirmation that this is ok to do.

    Thanks
    greg

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    Senior Member DvdHntr's Avatar
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    Need a little more information. Are the trusses standards? What is the span of the trusses? What is the wall height?

    From experience a double 45 stud can carry a fair bit but the grade of timber required will be dependant on the amount of load and that is why I asked the questions above.

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    roof is simple gable end, trusses standard. Trusses will span about 6.4 m, height of this wall is 3.1m. No detail on arch or engineer drawings except the size of the lintel required.

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    Senior Member DvdHntr's Avatar
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    2/90x45-MGP10 or greater will be sufficient. It will be supported over both studs at each end and the beam/top plate will need to be tied down to the studs with metal brace.

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    thanks for the confirmation. i assume that the windows and door configuration described above is ok.

    greg

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    Senior Member DvdHntr's Avatar
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    Because you are spanning over them their configuration makes little difference structurally. Just make sure that the designer of the beam has kept a strict limit on deflections as large door/window openings are affected more. Especially doors on rails.

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    Old Goat
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    Limit on deflections is only part of the solution. The top-of-door detail should allow clearance for whatever deflections are expected.

    Joe
    Of course truth is stranger than fiction.
    Fiction has to make sense. - Mark Twain

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    4K Club Member OBBob's Avatar
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    I migth have read it wrong ... but if it is a 6.4m wide gable end, that sounds like the back of a single fronted house. So if the end is comprise completely of doors and windows where is the lateral bracing? Am I off track?

    Also, I thought that in general a door jambwould require a stu next to it to secure it to. I'm not sure that a window frame would be sufficient unless it is designed for that purpose. Maybe you should ask the guys who designed it because French Doors seem to be hard enough to get right even in the normal method and they are greatly affected by any give in their structure.

    I'm not an expert and may be off track but they are just things that come to mind that you might want to check.

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    Senior Member DvdHntr's Avatar
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    Both valid points in the two posts above. I was just talking generally about large openings and deflections and as the wall is only 3.8 metres long, I'd assume that the wall is not the entire length of the bracing in that area. If it is a wall the juts out then there will need to be cross bracing in the ceiling line back to other walls that are braced.

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    4K Club Member OBBob's Avatar
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    Yeah ... I think I miss-read the wall lengths. Trusses span 6.4 but the wall 3.8, so there must be some areas that aren't windows.

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    I'd say it is probably a section near a deck or patio area due to the French doors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OBBob View Post
    I migth have read it wrong ... but if it is a 6.4m wide gable end, that sounds like the back of a single fronted house. So if the end is comprise completely of doors and windows where is the lateral bracing? Am I off track?

    Also, I thought that in general a door jamb would require a stu next to it to secure it to. I'm not sure that a window frame would be sufficient unless it is designed for that purpose. Maybe you should ask the guys who designed it because French Doors seem to be hard enough to get right even in the normal method and they are greatly affected by any give in their structure.

    I'm not an expert and may be off track but they are just things that come to mind that you might want to check.
    hi bob,
    didnt know this thread had continued! the discussion is about doors and windows on the east SIDE of the house leading onto a courtyard, not the gable end. I too, thought that a door jamb requires a stud next to it, but if I look at the architects and engineers drawings there is nothing between the door and window. Nevertheless, there is no space even if I wanted to put a stud. So looks like I may have problems with the french doors! Hmm, shouldnt the structural engineers have pointed all this out???
    Thanks for all YOUR advice and suggestions, a lot more useful than the engineers and architect.

    greg

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    btw there are some plans at this thread

    http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com...ad.php?t=64047

  14. #14
    Senior Member DvdHntr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gg23 View Post
    So looks like I may have problems with the french doors! Hmm, shouldnt the structural engineers have pointed all this out???
    It is actually the architects job. Engineers are only concerned by structural issues.

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