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New door in load bearing stud wall

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  1. #1
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    Default New door in load bearing stud wall

    Hi all, after 12 years of having no garage door from entrance hall to garage it's time to put one in.

    We built the house and made quite a few cuts due to cash purchase(straight of boat) the only really foolish one was omitting the garage door, I've looked at the plans and it's a load bearing wall , so obviously I can't just go cutting a door way through and moving the studs.

    How would I go about this, are there any permits that need granted before doing so?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    I'll let the chippies answer the details but more details needed. Plans. construction type Pictures etc
    But if that stud wall is the standard 450 or 600mm spacing no big deal at all if all you want is a bog standard internal door
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

    Legal disclaimer denying responsibility to be inserted here.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, It's 12 yr old brick veneer single story house, not sure about the stud spacing but I presume it's one of those, just got out the plan and noticed wall between hall and garage is load bearing.

    Just thought if I needed to alter I would need council approval

  4. #4
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    Most people do not bother for small internal stuff, council permit fees are a real rip-off on tiny jobs
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

    Legal disclaimer denying responsibility to be inserted here.

  5. #5
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    Thanks Moondog, thing is though can I get tripped up when selling house if an internal door in load bearing wall that isn't on plans with no permit. I know I'm in a different country but this came up when selling my UK house, the surveyor wanted permits for our through lounge we knocked through,

  6. #6
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    Default New door in load bearing stud wall

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraser65 View Post
    Thanks Moondog, thing is though can I get tripped up when selling house if an internal door in load bearing wall that isn't on plans with no permit. I know I'm in a different country but this came up when selling my UK house, the surveyor wanted permits for our through lounge we knocked through,
    I think if the work has been done by a licensed professional (being structural and all) and you have the docs to show it, it shouldnt be an issue if it's on plans or not.

    If you DIY I guess you would have to show the engineering or calcs you did to determine the size of the lintel.

    Don't quote me on that but I'm pretty sure that's how it goes


    ===========================

  7. #7
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    Thing is Micky a standard door opening doesn't need a lintel unless it is the lower floor of a 2 story building and even then it's only a couple of 90*45 on edge, stud detail changes tho but that is a really easy job too. If you get a permit no problem down the track ; it just adds $500- or so to the job costs. Compared to the cost of sawing out the venereal brick I guess that's nothing
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

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  8. #8
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    Thanks Micky, I love a bit of D.I.Y but I think in this case definitely best to get a pro in as will cover my @@@@ later.

    Didn't think It would need a lintel, I thought just two shorter studs connected to he studs either side, with a double plate supported by them supporting the cut load bearing stud.

  9. #9
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    Moondog, must have posted at same time No brick to cut through just plasterboard and studs.

  10. #10
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    You need to know where the opening is going is not a point loading point. Also try and select an area where there is no diagonal bracing. You could get someone in to do it but that doesn't necessarily mean they will seek approvals.

  11. #11
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    If the opening does have a point load there are many ways of dealing with it. Most of those ways are covered in the timber framing manual and it is worth while getting one, most peoples questions can be answered by a read of it. I got mine cheap when our chippie mate updated to a new one.
    Our chippie mate did a couple here as part of another job, it took the Pro a couple of hours to do each opening, it really is a very simple job, add a little extra time and some timber costs for sistering in a new stud each side to make it a really good job but the removed stud is usually used to make the noggin needed
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

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  12. #12
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    Thanks again all, your help has been invaluable and appreciated

  13. #13
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    Default New door in load bearing stud wall

    Quote Originally Posted by Moondog55 View Post
    Thing is Micky a standard door opening doesn't need a lintel unless it is the lower floor of a 2 story building and even then it's only a couple of 90*45 on edge, stud detail changes tho but that is a really easy job too. If you get a permit no problem down the track ; it just adds $500- or so to the job costs. Compared to the cost of sawing out the venereal brick I guess that's nothing
    A standard door opening on a load bearing wall definitely needs a lintel. If it's a tile roof and there's a prop over the opening it will likely need to be bigger than 90x45.

  14. #14
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    Yes OK I'm wrong there in the way I said it but the lintel can go at the noggin point. I did say to handle a point load [ called Top plate stiffening] if needed and 2 off 90*45 is way overkill, although every time I do it I use 140 * 45 because I usually have scraps to 1200mm lying around
    Table 24 says a 90*35/90*45 for a door width opening and there is an ambiguity in the standards for openings not greater than 900mm
    A couple of 90*45s is good for 1500mm; depending on rafter span

    "sistering in a new stud each side to make it a really good job" I should have said directly that this was to allow for the use of a lintel if needed; the use of doubled 90*45s resting on the cut off stud IS a lintel, you may also use a noggin plate/ lintel trimmer but it isn't really needed for a door sized opening Does make a nice job tho
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

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  15. #15
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    Thanks again Moondog .

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