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Opening up a doorway in a load bearing wall

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  1. #1
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    Default Opening up a doorway in a load bearing wall

    Hi guys,

    Im looking to open up a door way in my loungeroom to make it a double opening without any doors. The problem i have is that there is a roof strut coming off the top plate of the wall i want t open up. i want to know how and where can i relocate the roof strut, i dont want to put a lintel in because i want the celing all the same height and not with the drop down look of a bulkhead? Its the right strut im looking to move.
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  2. #2
    1K Club Member Pulse's Avatar
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    Default

    what about putting the lintel in the roof space?

    Pulse

  3. #3
    GeoffW1
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    Quote Originally Posted by matto 1 View Post
    Hi guys,

    Im looking to open up a door way in my loungeroom to make it a double opening without any doors. The problem i have is that there is a roof strut coming off the top plate of the wall i want t open up. i want to know how and where can i relocate the roof strut, i dont want to put a lintel in because i want the celing all the same height and not with the drop down look of a bulkhead? Its the right strut im looking to move.
    Hi,

    If you relocate that strut, it can't be too far from where it is now, or the unsupported span of the underpurlin becomes too great. You can get some idea from here how far you can go

    http://www.timber.org.au/resources/S...D_RG1_N1-3.pdf

    So where is the nearest point you could land it onto a wall top plate which does not have a doorway right underneath? If there is not a likely support point nearby you had best leave it there.

    I am unsure what you mean by not having a lintel. Do you mean you want the ceiling to be flush right through the new doorway opening? What would the door close against at the top? And what of the cornice?

    There is almost always some sort of lintel beam above the door opening even if only minimal, say to the depth of the cornice over plus the vertical width of the doorway architrave. That is not to say you could put a roof support right over that though.

    Cheers

  4. #4
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    Yes i want the ceiling running flush right the way through. Im not have any doors, it is a single door way at the moment and i want to open it up to a 2 meter opening without any doors. It will have a lintel at the moment above the door way but that will go in order to achieve the flush ceiling look. That roof strut could of been 1 meter over and there would of been no hassels, but its always good to learn and figure out how to do it yourself.

    One other thing can you tell me the advantages of using posts and stirrups, to just digging a hole and concreting your post directly into the ground. Im thinking of my carport which has 6 posts. Do i pour pads for stirrups or dig holes?

  5. #5
    Member blak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matto 1 View Post
    One other thing can you tell me the advantages of using posts and stirrups, to just digging a hole and concreting your post directly into the ground. Im thinking of my carport which has 6 posts. Do i pour pads for stirrups or dig holes?
    I believe stirrups is the correct method.

  6. #6
    Oink! Oink! pawnhead's Avatar
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    Default

    You could use a cable truss under your purlin, but it would probably be dearer than Pulse's suggestion of just putting a lintel in the roof.

    If your carport is freestanding, then you should use heavy duty post supports or a pair of fish plates (with a packer and dampcourse between the post and the concrete) on each post.
    They will give it more rigidity than standard brackets, and unlike having the posts buried in concrete where they will rot, they'll be elevated. And even if they do rot, they can be replaced relatively easily.
    Cheers, John

    Short Stack (my son's band)


  7. #7
    Golden Member GraemeCook's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pulse View Post
    what about putting the lintel in the roof space?

    Pulse

    Hi Pulse

    Are you suggesting that Matto puts in the new lintel on top of the joist beside the roof strut? Seems elegantly simple.

    Cheers

    Graeme


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